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swimming in Lake Chapala


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On 3/22/2018 at 1:22 PM, Tiny said:

I was kicked out.

I doubt you were.

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On 3/22/2018 at 4:12 PM, mudgirl said:

Urine is actually sterile, can't make you sick, unlike Ecoli.

Not many people swim in the lake. Few water ski on in as one young man was kidnapped while water skiing. 

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On 3/21/2018 at 2:12 PM, dcstroker said:

As one that has kayaked and now rows on the lake I can state for a fact the lake is usually surprisingly warm. I could be wrong but I surmise that the depth of the lake has a lot to do with that. It's not a particularly deep lake.

There are detailed records of the lake temperature that show that the temperature is about 20 degrees year round in most places.

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21 minutes ago, dichosalocura said:

Maybe Chapala is not totally full, but compared to 2012 it looks like a completely different lake. Those indeed were sad times.

I guess it was 2012, I do not remember. because I have been coming down to Lake Chapala since 1997. What I remember is that the lake was so low that there were roads where you could drive on what is now covered with water. Heck, the lake was so low, that you could drive due south of where the lakeshore is now some one hundred  to 200 feet to reach the shoreline. The lake was actually somewhat smaller during those very dry years.

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To dichosalocura,

If you scan any studies by Dr. Tyrone Hayes @Cal-Berkley his career is studying the affects of toxins on frogs. It may not kill them the the genetic affects are shocking. The main affects in his studies are complete feminization of males even to the point of reproduction. Of course the offspring are of poor quality and don't thrive. He also has some YouTube videos.

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So the outflow of Lake Chapala is the Santiago River that then flows through Guadalajara? Does anyone know what the land is used for as it makes it's way to the Pacific? It appears to flow into the ocean above PV. Anyone know how the currents work as the river moves into the ocean?  Does the water flow one direction or another?

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4 minutes ago, medcare651 said:

So the outflow of Lake Chapala is the Santiago River that then flows through Guadalajara? Does anyone know what the land is used for as it makes it's way to the Pacific? It appears to flow into the ocean above PV. Anyone know how the currents work as the river moves into the ocean?  Does the water flow one direction or another?

It flows downhill in whatever direction that is.

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11 hours ago, medcare651 said:

Computer Guy, are there any reports that are footnoted. I would like to expand my research based on what Mr. Strong states. Thanks

You have asked people questions here and on the Lerma River Article thread that are many years old.

 

I bought the Kindle version of Bill Dahl's book.  I did not finish it as I felt it was very bad. He had been in Ajijic for around 3 weeks (not in a row) for his research. Some may find his views useful, I did not.

Hope this helps.

https://www.billdahl.net/articles/lake-chapala-state-of-the-lake-2019/

 

https://www.amazon.com/Lake-Chapala-Beneath-Considerations-Retiring-ebook/dp/B07MZXPFQC/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=bill+dahl&qid=1615658593&s=digital-text&sr=1-3

 

Edited by Whipstock
Poor Spelling
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54 minutes ago, medcare651 said:

Computer Guy, are there any reports that are footnoted. I would like to expand my research based on what Mr. Strong states. Thanks

It's DOCTOR TODD STONG and computer guy is no longer a member here. If you're that interested,expand your interest by using Google.

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2 hours ago, happyjillin said:

It's DOCTOR TODD STONG and computer guy is no longer a member here. If you're that interested,expand your interest by using Google.

Hey thanks. What do you mean? You mean do my own search? That I've done but I would like your references.

 

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Here, this article by one of our most well known environmental activists may help.

http://saudicaves.com/mx/salto/index.html

The marshes next to the airport are going to cleaned and sanitized because the airport wants to expand.

On the lake, near Ocatlan, lake water is pumped up to a large reservoir, the water is then purified to "safe for human consumption", and it is pumped to Guadalajara through a terrible old, leaky system. They don't even knows where it goes, but nobody drinks it. They applied for a second pipeline to be built, but that was ultimately turned down. One of the problems was that they wanted to take more Lake water than the government allows. The Federal government owns all waterways in Mexico. This is why you see in Puerto Vallarta and Guadalajara many slum like housing in the Arroyos, dried stream beds. The municipal government have minimum clout over this. Then the rains come, flash floods, everything destroyed, death s.

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7 hours ago, medcare651 said:

So the outflow of Lake Chapala is the Santiago River that then flows through Guadalajara? Does anyone know what the land is used for as it makes it's way to the Pacific? It appears to flow into the ocean above PV. Anyone know how the currents work as the river moves into the ocean?  Does the water flow one direction or another?

Yes, If you drive the coast road you pass over a large bridge in Nayarit that crosses the Santiagao. Many people on the gravel bars there- wsshing clothes, horses cars, etc. 

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Pete it was more like 2000 , 2001,  I like the lake then , we could drive or walk to San Juan  on the lake bed, there were trees cattle and the people living there had not taken over all the land.. It had a lot of pluses..

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Yes, I read about it and have seen old videos on youtube showing how low it got in 2000.  I'm glad I missed those years.  We moved down in 2011, the following summer in 2012 is when the water started receding drastically again.  Not as extreme as what happened back in 2000, though.  But still sad looking never the less.  I understand it is a cyclical type of phenomenon for Lake Chapala, the water level has always gone up and down since time memorable.  Millions of years ago it was the size of a sea called Mar Chapálica where dinosaurs and mammoths hung out to drink the fresh water.

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51 minutes ago, dichosalocura said:

.  I understand it is a cyclical type of phenomenon for Lake Chapala, the water level has always gone up and down since time memorable.  

Yes, just in my lifetime here from in the mid 70´s, when you had to drive through 20 to 30 cm. of water covering Ramon Corona in Chapala and !6 de sep/Independencua in Ajijic to the water being so far out that you needed binoculars to see it from the malecones.

Nobody wants a basement near the laguna when the water is high.....😀

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13 hours ago, happyjillin said:

It flows downhill in whatever direction that is.

Except that one place where we walked on top of the water, it was running uphill.

Hope to see you at the corned beef and cabbage affair next week as I have a lot of late "blarney" releases.  It starts at 2PM and they are ready, said you were booked for sure.

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I have enjoyed reading this thread. My advice is to live here or not. Move here because of the beauty of the area and the people. Don’t move here because you fear the feminization of bullfrogs. Argue over who knows more about the lake and who is or is not an expert. It really does not matter. The lake is here and it is beautiful. You can live the wonderful life offered here or play junior scientist and attempt to generate as much fear as you can. We shall all be dead soon enough. Lake Chapala will continue to exist as it has for thousands of years. 

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20 hours ago, medcare651 said:

So the outflow of Lake Chapala is the Santiago River that then flows through Guadalajara? Does anyone know what the land is used for as it makes it's way to the Pacific? It appears to flow into the ocean above PV. Anyone know how the currents work as the river moves into the ocean?  Does the water flow one direction or another?

The Santiago flows around the east side of Guadalajara not through it.

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21 hours ago, medcare651 said:

So the outflow of Lake Chapala is the Santiago River that then flows through Guadalajara? Does anyone know what the land is used for as it makes it's way to the Pacific? It appears to flow into the ocean above PV. Anyone know how the currents work as the river moves into the ocean?  Does the water flow one direction or another?

The problem with Lake Chapala is the same as with Lake Sahara--yeah, Lake Sahara. They both have no outflow so there's too much siltification. This means that their volume to surface area is out of the proportion so that there is too much evaporation and not enough of a reservoir because its too shallow.  Eventually it will go underground.  I wish that when the lake was extremely low that they would have excavated a deep channel to hold water.  there was a rumor at that time that a Japanese company wanted to dredge the lake and was willing to build a train spur to take away the soil to Japan for topsoil, but local groups fought them claiming that this was a Mexican patronim and not for sale.  Always been rumors of treasure buried in the lake....I heard that the lake exits in the west end underground under the hills west of Joco.  there are salt lakes there. Our lake used to cover the entire state of Jalisco.

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In the many reports that I have read I have never read that the lake exits at the west end. Eutrophication and filling up of a lake with silt is a natural process. Lake Chapala is in a more advanved stage than many lakes NOB. The lake used to be much longer at both the east and west ends and deeper. Eventually the lake bottom will be farmland as it is now to the east and west of the lake.                              

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