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Questions about working or volunteering Ajijic


bobsf
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I am a 52 and currently living in San Francisco. I have been to Ajijic 5 times over the last 2 years and really like it.  I could see myself retiring full time to Mexico.  I may soon start going to Ajijic one week of each month.   I call what I do clinical bodywork.  I have a grad degree in rehabilitation science and am a licensed massage therapist.  I also teach a neuromuscular technique that was developed in the San Francisco Bay area.  My clients come in with all types of pain issues such as back, shoulder, neck, knee, elbow, hand, foot and ankle etc.  The techniques I do are very effective for post-surgical rehabilitation.  Since I use techniques to work with injuries that very few Mexicans have been trained in would I be able to do this work in Ajijic at some point?  I would also be interested in training the Mexican physical therapists and others that would like to learn the techniques I use.  I would also consider volunteering at a physical therapy clinic.  Does anyone have any advice for me about doing my rehabilitation techniques and/or for volunteering down in Ajijic? 
 
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Volunteering such a thing would in no way affect workers here. Lakeside is crawling with retired expats, now working as volunteers of every nature in every possible aspect of life. Dr. Todd Stong, for example, has worked as a volunteer here for many years, trying to clean up the lake and the water system, and no one has complained that he is putting any professionals out of work.

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Dr. Stong isn't getting paid so nobody cares and he's not putting someone out of work.  I haven't heard anything recently, but in the past there was talk about volunteers needing work permits but nothing ever came of that issue.  As a medical/deep tissue/rehab massage therapist for 17 years in the States I can tell you than in order to get a cedula (license to practice in Mexico) you must work one year where ever the govt. sends you in a govt. facility for small pay.  There are some folks here who never did their govt. service work and don't have a cedula.  IF ever there was a problem and such a person were turned in to the govt. for not having a cedula, they would be deported immediately.  Gotta play by the rules.  But you sound like a good fit to work with chiros, PTs and docs and do a lot of good here. 

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3 hours ago, Yo1 said:

Dr. Stong isn't getting paid so nobody cares and he's not putting someone out of work.

The statement made was thus: " Volunteering would probably take clients away from skilled and licensed Mexican professionals." So I'm not sure what your point is.

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A license and INM permission to work will be mandatory. 

I was once warned off a volunteer position by INM for teaching English to children. I was replaced by missionaries with work permits, and who had complained to INM.  Ugh!!!!!

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On 2/27/2018 at 11:00 AM, bobsf said:
Since I use techniques to work with injuries that very few Mexicans have been trained in would I be able to do this work in Ajijic at some point?  I would also be interested in training the Mexican physical therapists and others that would like to learn the techniques I use.  I would also consider volunteering at a physical therapy clinic.  Does anyone have any advice for me about doing my rehabilitation techniques and/or for volunteering down in Ajijic? 
 

I would suggest talking to the leading chiropractor in the area.  He is Victor Youcha with a practice in Ajijic.  You`ll have to look him up on Google.  He can tell you everything you need to know about how to proceed.

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The law says:  If you do anything lucrative in Mexico, as an expat, you had better have the proper visa, RFC, CURP, cedula, etc.  Otherwise, you got trouble.

Then, there is the perception of competition from locals, which can also lead to real trouble......sometimes just once, and never again heard from.

Oh well. Some folks think they are superior and entitled to do whatever they want, wherever they wish.  Some even get away with it.......for awhile.

You cannot just go to another country and start working. It is prohibited.

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13 hours ago, Yo1 said:

Thankfully, Victor is not one of those.

Right, he is very helpful and since there will be no competition between Victor`s practice, chiropractic, and bobsf`s, post-surgical rehabilitation, there shouldn`t be a problem.  In addition, the reason why I suggested Victor to bobsf is that their practices will be mutually beneficial.  Victor has been practicing in Mexico in the health field in a licensed manner for many years so his advice and help will be invaluable.

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