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I want to move to Lake Chapala


LisaTravel
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1 minute ago, gringal said:

Aw, c'mon.  Of course it's a series of Mexican villages, but on some levels it has quite a few elements of a retirement community for English speakers.  Consider all the services catering to them. She's going to get the picture well enough when she visits. 

IMO, we should be as helpful as we can to a daughter trying to find a good option for her dad? Any of us who had to help elderly parents find a good living solution know what a challenge it can be, even when there is no cognitive impairment.  Been there.

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The largest issue facing the OP is that she is planning to move here "in a few years".  She might want to reconsider that time gap because therein lies the potential problems.

 Sonia mentioned the conditions at the Senior Care facilities in SMA. I don't know if that is the same as the "Assisted Living" places here or not.  I doubt that they lock the residents up at the latter.  However, my own experience in the States showed me what the problems can be, even when there is an adult child who can take over the finances and make other arrangements for the elder.  The real nightmare for the older person comes if he/she is alone and there is no one.

As Sonia, Ferret and others pointed out, no matter what she does, it's going to be difficult for all concerned.

 For some good answers, I  can recommend a local "facilitator", Luzma Grande (English speaking) re the immigration, health care, and many other issues: ajijicconcierge@gmail.com

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Lisa, this is the Wild West.  There are no standards, no government agencies monitoring the retirement facilities and human nature being what it is, as would be true anywhere, there are unscrupulous people taking advantage of those who cannot keep their full wits about them at all times.  The stories are rife, everyone here knows them.  This is a "community" where thousands of rich people (certainly in the eyes of the people who have lived here for hundreds of years) have settled into an area where some do not even have enough food to eat (and I`m including Ajijic in this). Without you here to stay on top of your father and everyone he deals with, chances of him being robbed blind within a month are, let`s say,  high enough to give one pause.  A smile here can simply be the practiced raising of the corners of one`s mouth and have nothing to do with a beneficent nature. 

It takes more than several months (even years) to get to know the culture here, how things are, what can happen.  It can be paradise for those who are still fully functional and can navigate dangerous cobblestone streets and uneven sidewalks, can get out any time they want unaided, appraise those who approach them, navigate the complicated health scene; walk about, bus about and drive about to get what they need, visit friends and see the sights.  But for those not fully functional it can be hell and very frightening.  For all first timers, it takes a good long while to fully appreciate this is a very different country and culture and that people operate very differently. To learn to operate in this sphere takes a long time. For those without full cognitive abilities?  It is possible this would simply be a living hell without you constantly with him.

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12 minutes ago, bdmowers said:

Lisa, this is the Wild West.  There are no standards, no government agencies monitoring the retirement facilities and human nature being what it is, as would be true anywhere, there are unscrupulous people taking advantage of those who cannot keep their full wits about them at all times.  The stories are rife, everyone here knows them.  This is a "community" where thousands of rich people (certainly in the eyes of the people who have lived here for hundreds of years) have settled into an area where some do not even have enough food to eat (and I`m including Ajijic in this). Without you here to stay on top of your father and everyone he deals with, chances of him being robbed blind within a month are, let`s say,  high enough to give one pause.  A smile here can simply be the practiced raising of the corners of one`s mouth and have nothing to do with a beneficent nature. 

It takes more than several months (even years) to get to know the culture here, how things are, what can happen.  It can be paradise for those who are still fully functional and can navigate dangerous cobblestone streets and uneven sidewalks, can get out any time they want unaided, appraise those who approach them, navigate the complicated health scene; walk about, bus about and drive about to get what they need, visit friends and see the sights.  But for those not fully functional it can be hell and very frightening.  For all first timers, it takes a good long while to fully appreciate this is a very different country and culture and that people operate very differently. To learn to operate in this sphere takes a long time. For those without full cognitive abilities?  It is possible this would simply be a living hell without you constantly with him.

Putting your father here in Mexico is no different than putting him in, say, Singapore, or Australia, or Chile, or anywhere else you are unfamiliar with.  It`s gambling with his life.

If you were going for shock points, you did a good job. HAHAHAHA

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7 minutes ago, Tiny said:

If you were going for shock points, you did a good job. HAHAHAHA

I wasn`t, I did not mean to shock, just trying to give the lay of the land, realistically, for someone in Lisa`s father`s situation.  This is not Canada or the US!

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24 minutes ago, bdmowers said:

I wasn`t, I did not mean to shock, just trying to give the lay of the land, realistically, for someone in Lisa`s father`s situation.  This is not Canada or the US!

I know you were not. I was joking about how many NOB'ers think it would be so easy to move to Mexico or other counties. What really concerns me about her father is that I know, first hand, how fast it can change from fully independent to fully dependent. I was my mother's care giver for 5 years until she passed away.

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13 minutes ago, Tiny said:

I know you were not. I was joking about how many NOB'ers think it would be so easy to move to Mexico or other counties. What really concerns me about her father is that I know, first hand, how fast it can change from fully independent to fully dependent. I was my mother's care giver for 5 years until she passed away.

Was that NOB or here?

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Lisa, your father would lose his Canadian health care. He would have to demonstrate retirement payments of $2281 USD a month, or a savings account that averaged $94,000 USD over a year. He would be eligible for Mexico’s health coverage for poor residents, Seguro Popular. He would not be eligible for Mexico’s general health care program, IMSS. I do not think he would be eligible for private insurance. If hospitalized, he would need someone to stay with him, to handle his bed pan, bring him food and water, bring him bed linens and change them.  Many Canadians return to Canada when they start to have serious health problems. They go back to reestablish residency for health coverage. 

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23 minutes ago, ajijiccharlie said:

He would be eligible for Mexico’s health coverage for poor residents, Seguro Popular. He would not be eligible for Mexico’s general health care program, IMSS. I do not think he would be eligible for private insurance.

By this, do you mean Seguro Popular would likely provide coverage for his pre-existing conditions while IMSS and private insurance would probably exclude coverage for those conditions? Or do you think IMSS and the private companies would simply deny him entirely? I'm trying to sort through the myriad insurance options in Mexico. Lots of ins and outs, so to speak.

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Just now, Sorn said:

By this, do you mean Seguro Popular would likely provide coverage for his pre-existing conditions while IMSS and private insurance would probably exclude coverage for those conditions? Or do you think IMSS and the private companies would simply deny him entirely? I'm trying to sort through the myriad insurance options in Mexico. Lots of ins and outs, so to speak.

I think he would be too old to join IMSS. I think he would have an exclusion due to the stroke. I do not think he would qualify for private insurance. I know that private insurance becomes soberingly expensive after 70. 

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9 minutes ago, ajijiccharlie said:

I think he would be too old to join IMSS. I think he would have an exclusion due to the stroke. I do not think he would qualify for private insurance. I know that private insurance becomes soberingly expensive after 70. 

IMSS would probably exclude him.  Seguro Popular is available to older people and those with pre-existing conditions.  Private insurance:  Very costly, and has exclusions.

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1 hour ago, ajijiccharlie said:

Lisa, your father would lose his Canadian health care. He would have to demonstrate retirement payments of $2281 USD a month, or a savings account that averaged $94,000 USD over a year. He would be eligible for Mexico’s health coverage for poor residents, Seguro Popular. He would not be eligible for Mexico’s general health care program, IMSS. I do not think he would be eligible for private insurance. If hospitalized, he would need someone to stay with him, to handle his bed pan, bring him food and water, bring him bed linens and change them.  Many Canadians return to Canada when they start to have serious health problems. They go back to reestablish residency for health coverage. 

Financial solvency for a Residente Temporal is much less than for a Residente Permanente you quoted. Both legal residents can join the Seguro Popular which no longer is "only" for the poor. It´s facilties usualy match the IMSS and in some áreas are better.

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29 minutes ago, AlanMexicali said:

Financial solvency for a Residente Temporal is much less than for a Residente Permanente you quoted. Both legal residents can join the Seguro Popular which no longer is "only" for the poor. It´s facilties usualy match the IMSS and in some áreas are better.

So you have been treated by both (Seguro Popular & IMSS) services?

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1 hour ago, Sorn said:

By this, do you mean Seguro Popular would likely provide coverage for his pre-existing conditions while IMSS and private insurance would probably exclude coverage for those conditions? Or do you think IMSS and the private companies would simply deny him entirely? I'm trying to sort through the myriad insurance options in Mexico. Lots of ins and outs, so to speak.

Almost assuredly they would both deny coverage completely.

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53 minutes ago, AlanMexicali said:

Financial solvency for a Residente Temporal is much less than for a Residente Permanente you quoted. Both legal residents can join the Seguro Popular which no longer is "only" for the poor. It´s facilties usualy match the IMSS and in some áreas are better.

Are you suggesting the OP move her father here permanently, but on a temporary visa? How is this man going to handle the annual renewals?  

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1 hour ago, Sorn said:

By this, do you mean Seguro Popular would likely provide coverage for his pre-existing conditions while IMSS and private insurance would probably exclude coverage for those conditions? Or do you think IMSS and the private companies would simply deny him entirely? I'm trying to sort through the myriad insurance options in Mexico. Lots of ins and outs, so to speak.

He would have SP coverage as long as he is a temporary or permanent resident. IMSS would disqualify him for having pre-existing conditions besides that it has to be renewed annually for ~ 8000 p with first year coverage being almost nil. 

Temporary residence renewal is once at end of 1 year and again at end of 4 years. 

Based on lack of her responses I think Lisa has opted out. 

 

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8 minutes ago, pappysmarket said:

Almost assuredly they would both deny coverage completely.

I am not sure that is true with IMSS.  They know of my pre-existing health condition. I have seen one of their heart doctors and get some of my heart medication from them.  They do not have some of the expense medications.

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Seguro Popular denies no one regarding pre-existing conditions. They do not even ask the questions. I have signed up thousands. IMSS does ask and deny.

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