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Try and cut back more slowly Pete than jumping down a full 50% at once. And run that by your Doctor friend. When your body gets used to something, it rebels unless you trick it. Baby steps. Best of luck!

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Thanks for the tip. Ferret. I could try by cutting one of the pills in half and going from two times 50 or 100 to 1 and 1/2 times 50 and only taking 75 mg. I read this just in time.

Thanks again.

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24 minutes ago, johanson said:

Thanks for the tip. Ferret. I could try by cutting one of the pills in half and going from two times 50 or 100 to 1 and 1/2 times 50 and only taking 75 mg. I read this just in time.

Thanks again.

Regarding "discontinuation effects" of Tramadol, go slowly tapering down. The withdrawal symptoms for that drug are very rough and varied. I struggled with that for a long time until I finally got off. I didn't realize that I was taking the 200's until well on the way into dependency.

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On ‎2‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 6:13 PM, hensley said:

Pete where do you get the 200mg?

 

I went to a pharmacy today and asked them where I could get the 200 mg tablets. I was told that what I had heard or remembered was wrong and that the largest size available was not 200, but 150 mg. When I said a pharmacist checked on line and said that it was 200 mg.

I was told No that this is not correct and brought out a box of 150s.

Sorry for the wrong information earlier.

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On 2/15/2018 at 3:53 PM, michael2595 said:

I was sent home from surgery with 1 weeks supply of very heavy duty pain killer. Dilaudid. I took one pill and not another. Your sister in law is correct for so many people. I lived with the pain. In a way I called my pain Joe my friend, and I healed quite well. When on pain killer after other surgeries I did too much, thinking I was fine and I wasn't , just numb. I paid the price. And when one is on pain killer for a week or so and doctor says no more you go cold turkey. Thats why so many people try and buy it illegally. I read an article that spoke of 75% of the medication taken in the world is by Americans.  If that is correct, something is definitely wrong.

 

I'd not doubt that 75%, judging by the unbelievable number of medications it seems almost all Americans I know are on. If I mention that i'm stressed out about something, I can bank on some American friend saying "Oh, you want a Valium, oh you want a Xanax?" They all seem to have a whole barrage of pharmaceuticals on hand all the time. One thing to deal with one problem, another thing to counter the so-called side effects of the first drug, and on and on. I say so-called side effects because that's just a term big pharma uses to make it sound like something benign that may or may not happen to you. But, in fact, those ARE the effects of those drugs. In other words, they can't come up with a drug that works for some condition without it also giving you a dry mouth, insomnia, depression, etc.

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25 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

If I mention that i'm stressed out about something, I can bank on some American friend saying "Oh, you want a Valium, oh you want a Xanax?"reality-is-for-2.jpg

1

 

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On ‎2‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 1:37 PM, modeeper said:

Maybe it's a cost/benefit analysis.  Medical is big business.  Even though our elderly (de la tercera edad) are loved they have little worth on the "market."  Should a 10-year-old be put off for serious medical care in lieu of a person way past the national average life span? 

Plus you're in a country that might have a different sympathy threshold for the suffering, since they're related to the Aztecs, or any of the others who were here after the Conquest.   Talk about suffering!

Do you have any references for that assertion?  Considering the great respect that Mexicans give to their elders, it doesn't sound a likely note.

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3 hours ago, johanson said:

I went to a pharmacy today and asked them where I could get the 200 mg tablets. I was told that what I had heard or remembered was wrong and that the largest size available was not 200, but 150 mg. When I said a pharmacist checked on line and said that it was 200 mg.

I was told No that this is not correct and brought out a box of 150s.

Sorry for the wrong information earlier.

Actually cheaper to buy more of the 50s.

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43 minutes ago, El Toro Furioso said:

Do you have any references for that assertion?

36 years in country.  A completed Master's dissertation in Mexican Family Values, WWU 1981.  BA in cognitive anthropology, U of Washington, go Huskies

Grew up in East LA, 80% Mexican population.  Mom was a polyglot and university prof., Spanish, French.  First came here in 1950.   30 years in TEFL, 20 of those in Latin America,  Most of those at Mexico's second-ranked university, El ITESO, and six years in the Marine Biology Dept at UABCS, TOEFL, English to Spanish textbook translator.   

Six months in a Mexican jail, San Juan del Rio, Michoacan. 

Three terms (Three months of duty for three decades) for the US Census Bureau as a bilingual census enumerator in LA, Modesto, San Francisco.  Court interpreter, 1 1/2 years in Central California.  Intrepertor for a large construction company in Seattle WA.   And I still can't roll an R.  Oh, and I skipped the first grade ... does that count?

Does that make me more credentialed than you, Toro?  

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1 hour ago, mudgirl said:

I'd not doubt that 75%, judging by the unbelievable number of medications it seems almost all Americans I know are on. If I mention that i'm stressed out about something, I can bank on some American friend saying "Oh, you want a Valium, oh you want a Xanax?" They all seem to have a whole barrage of pharmaceuticals on hand all the time. One thing to deal with one problem, another thing to counter the so-called side effects of the first drug, and on and on. I say so-called side effects because that's just a term big pharma uses to make it sound like something benign that may or may not happen to you. But, in fact, those ARE the effects of those drugs. In other words, they can't come up with a drug that works for some condition without it also giving you a dry mouth, insomnia, depression, etc.

Valium and Xanax belong to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines.https://www.drugs.com/drug-class/benzodiazepines.html Same with clonazepam .Klonopin. Benzos are some of the most evil drugs known to man and are responsible for so much pain. Doctors hand out Xanax and klonopin like candy and in doing so are destroying lives. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzodiazepine_withdrawal_syndrome Its real. Also rebound anxiety. Never ever go off benzos cold turkey if you are a long time user and that may be as short as a month. It can literally kill you if you have been on it for years. I lost a good friend when she was taken off klonopin cold turkey. Threw herself in front of a train, the withdrawal  was so bad. But they called it suicide. There is no money for doctors and big pharma if they cure something  or if you die. They want to "manage" your issue. I have spoken to local doctors who say that they prescribe so much klonopin because they have to. Their patients come from NOB already addicted. easier to gett off of heroin.   https://www.alternet.org/story/151166/america's_most_dangerous_pill   

 

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Forgot - another side effect of opiods is constipation, this includes codeine. This is how Elvis Presley died - bad eating habits and chronic painkiller abuse. He died on his toilet - 42 years old.

Wiki:

Quote

The autopsy showed that his colon was full of more than 30 pounds of feces. Chronic constipation enlarges your colon, and Elvis' colon was twice as long and twice as wide as a normal colon. ... Elvis played racquetball on the day he died. He did not die of constipation; he died after suffering a heart attack.The autopsy showed that his colon was full of more than 30 pounds of feces. Chronic constipation enlarges your colon, and Elvis' colon was twice as long and twice as wide as a normal colon. ... Elvis played racquetball on the day he died. He did not die of constipation; he died after suffering a heart attack.

 

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On 2/14/2018 at 3:32 PM, gringal said:

Not so.  My regular doctor has prescribed such medications for pain on more than one occasion. More than one orthopedic surgeon I've seen has suggested heavy duty pain meds for life as the only alternative to serious surgery. Because I don't want the end result of addiction to anything, they've been rarely and very temporarily used. I don't know what they do in the U.S.A.

 

http://time.com/5012393/non-opioid-pain-relievers-just-as-effective-as-opioids/

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17 minutes ago, addtocart said:

What happened to the original topic?  Seguro Popular?  Remember?

Very good point, if folks wish to discuss the pros and cons of highly addictive pills please start a new thread

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You two are off base - the OP was about Seguro Popular not issuing painkillers and refusing surgery because of age.

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31 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

You two are off base - the OP was about Seguro Popular not issuing painkillers and refusing surgery because of age.

So many ppl want to run this place.

 

13.jpg

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13 hours ago, modeeper said:

36 years in country.  A completed Master's dissertation in Mexican Family Values, WWU 1981.  BA in cognitive anthropology, U of Washington, go Huskies

Grew up in East LA, 80% Mexican population.  Mom was a polyglot and university prof., Spanish, French.  First came here in 1950.   30 years in TEFL, 20 of those in Latin America,  Most of those at Mexico's second-ranked university, El ITESO, and six years in the Marine Biology Dept at UABCS, TOEFL, English to Spanish textbook translator.   

Six months in a Mexican jail, San Juan del Rio, Michoacan. 

Three terms (Three months of duty for three decades) for the US Census Bureau as a bilingual census enumerator in LA, Modesto, San Francisco.  Court interpreter, 1 1/2 years in Central California.  Intrepertor for a large construction company in Seattle WA.   And I still can't roll an R.  Oh, and I skipped the first grade ... does that count?

Does that make me more credentialed than you, Toro?  

Listen to a tape of a male Austrian from around Saltzburg speaking  German and you'll be rolling your R's in no time like a champ.

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2 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

You two are off base - the OP was about Seguro Popular not issuing painkillers and refusing surgery because of age.

The main point was the OP stated the mother was refused surgery because of her age which the OP knew nothing about or how the SP system works in this regard.

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1 hour ago, ned small said:

Listen to a tape of a male Austrian from around Saltzburg speaking  German and you'll be rolling your R's in no time like a champ.

:D

For years the Mexicans have tried to show me how it's done.  I always tell them, if I couldn't do it for my mother I won't be able to do it for you.

Tied tongue.  They say if you split a crows tongue he'll be able to talk.  Maybe that's what I need.  Can somebody recommend a good tongue doctor?

 

On topic:  Let's say two emergency patients just arrived to the ER, both with the same condition; a broken arm.

One is a 10 yo girl, the other an 85 yo woman.

A nurse comes out and tells the patients, "The medical staff will have a shift change in an hour.  The on-duty doctor can only attend to one of you at the mo.  The other will have to wait about an hour."

So what happens?  Do you think the nurse is going to choose the lucky one?  Will they flip a coin, draw straws?  

IMO, the elderly has to right of deference.  Is she going to stand up and walk past the little girl enroute to the OR?  No, she won't let that happen.  She'll defer to the child.  And the child's parents will give her a thousand thank yous and a lot of bowing.  

Sympathy goes to the child. Respect goes to the elderly.

The comment there somewhere above about the family's total dedication and respect to the old ones is BS.  You think Mexican families never fight and feud?  You think nobody here has ever been written out of a will?

My long-time pals Miguel's family is the perfect example.  Mother dies 12 years ago, father died 10 years ago.  Miguel has six brothers and sisters.  The old man left a small fortune.  They've been duking it out in court for 10 years.  Almost all the children stopped talking to one another during the blood letting.  So far not one of them has seen a peso of the old man's money.  

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On 2/15/2018 at 11:46 AM, AlanMexicali said:

I asked one of my sister in laws, a Psychiatrist, why the socialized medcine here doesn´t give people strong pain killers. Her answer was that when finished a surgery the policy is to let the patient feel the pain not numb the pain. It was because if you are moving around and acting like nothing is wrong you might pull the stiches or worse if something happens under the stress and then the time taken to restich you or readmit you back into the hospital would interfer with the scheduling and cost time and money and possibly leave you with scar tissue or worse - depends on the procedure. If you lay in bed and hurt you will stay there and heal.  :blink:

Your sister-in-law is wrong. Treating pain helps a patient to heal faster. Tell her to read about it.

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120381128

 

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5 hours ago, Joco said:

Your sister-in-law is wrong. Treating pain helps a patient to heal faster. Tell her to read about it.

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120381128

 

She is not wrong by simply stating the protocol the Mexican Socialized Medical System follows. I will send her the link. Last year she took a 10 month required university medical course. She lives in San Luis Potosí and the university was in Leon, Gto. so she had to commute weekly and rent an apartment.

Maybe they got tired of Rancheros doing rodeo a few days after their surgery and decided  this is a way to prevent readmitting them to repair the damage. :blink:

 

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11 hours ago, AlanMexicali said:

She is not wrong by simply stating the protocol the Mexican Socialized Medical System follows. I will send her the link. Last year she took a 10 month required university medical course. She lives in San Luis Potosí and the university was in Leon, Gto. so she had to commute weekly and rent an apartment.

Maybe they got tired of Rancheros doing rodeo a few days after their surgery and decided  this is a way to prevent readmitting them to repair the damage. :blink:

 

Why is a psychiatrist taking a pain med course? Maybe,  like doctors in the US thought for years, a person can become an addict if he gets pain meds. A person can only become addicted if he takes more than needed to treat the pain. If it only relieves pain and doesn't cause euphoria, he will not become addicted. People heal faster when the body is not in pain.

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2 minutes ago, Joco said:

Why is a psychiatrist taking a pain med course? Maybe,  like doctors in the US thought for years, a person can become an addict if he gets pain meds. A person can only become addicted if he takes more than needed to treat the pain. If it only relieves pain and doesn't cause euphoria, he will not become addicted. People heal faster when the body is not in pain.

"A person can only become addicted if he takes more than needed to treat the pain"

Beg to differ:  Pain meds are addictive.  I've just spent a miserable four days in withdrawal from a common pain med prescribed for post-surgical use.  Used it exactly as prescribed.  Before that, miserable symptoms from the pain med itself. I can relate to what Elvis went through as well.  None of that can be good for a body.  Just my personal opinion from the POV of the user.

 

 

I

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"A person can only become addicted if he takes more than needed to treat the pain"

Unfortunately, this is wrong on many levels. And it is a common misconception, based on lack of information and a "common sense" approach that has crippled suburban America. Coomon sense tells us this should be true. Experience shows it not to be. Haven't heard of a single person who wants to become addicted, yet housewifes and teenagers across the country are so hooked they are moving off prescribed painkillers to the cheaper heroin.

But just ask yourself: how much is more than necessary to treat the pain? if it's not working well enough, you take more. And the cycle begins.

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