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Lobster prices


ComputerGuy
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I have heard that for the last couple of years, the rise in ocean temperatures has caused an abundance of lobster, bringing the prices down dramatically. Yet here in Mexico, that is not reflected in our local restaurants. So I took a look today at wholesale prices. How much profit should a restaurant make off lobster?
Granted, these are Maine prices, but they do reflect the overall reality of lobster fishing these days.

https://www.newenglandprovisions.com/mainelobster.html

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I was always a fan of cold water lobster until I had Cuban Lobster. OMG! Sweetest and nuttiest tasting lobster EVER. So why isn't Mexico getting their lobster from Cuba? Closer and already used to warm water. Why aren't they transplanting Cuban lobsters around the coast of Mexico where I think they might be happily prolific? Win/win for everyone. I just drooled on my keyboard. Sigh.

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No, it is not a lobster, Homerus Americanus. It is a langosta, as its proper name informs, “langosta cubana“, and is a warm water species without large claws.

Homerus Americanus, the “Maine Lobster“ or the North Atlantic Lobster, is a deep, cold water species; an entirely different animal.

I don‘t know what a particular restaurant may actually serve, but some may cook tails from South Africa, Australia or Mexican langosta in the Cuban manner, ie: “Langosta a la Cubana“, the name of the dish, not necessarily the source of the animal.

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I can tell you with certainty that the lobster tails that I had, in Canada, were imported from Cuba. I saw the box, that my stepson arrived with and had ordered them through his restaurant. We cooked them ourselves (along with filet mignon) on the BBQ so there was no fancy dancy restaurant name associated with them. Nor do I know what the "official" name was.... other than really, really yummy. They may not be lobster... but they sure looked like it and the taste was lobster but enhanced to a heavenly level.

 

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Thanks for that. The telling paragraph in that report:

Herring is the bait used to catch lobster, and "herring prices have quadrupled over the past 15 years. Steve Train of Long Island, Maine, whose lobster boat I went out on Wednesday morning, estimated that a hypothetical lobsterman who brings in 40,000 pounds of lobster a year (more than the state average but less than Train usually gets) spends $40,000 to $50,000 a year on bait. After that, fuel, labor and other costs, "a guy landing 40,000 pounds a year is maybe making $45,000 a year."

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1 hour ago, Ferret said:

I can tell you with certainty that the lobster tails that I had, in Canada, were imported from Cuba. I saw the box, that my stepson arrived with and had ordered them through his restaurant. We cooked them ourselves (along with filet mignon) on the BBQ so there was no fancy dancy restaurant name associated with them. Nor do I know what the "official" name was.... other than really, really yummy. They may not be lobster... but they sure looked like it and the taste was lobster but enhanced to a heavenly level.

 

Wow!  Why would anyone in Canada want to import Cuban langosta?  East Coast lobster, either from Nova Scotia or Prince Edward Island in Canada, or Maine lobster are the best!  Nothing else can compare!

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The Chinese exports also keep prices high. Years ago, mad cow caused S Korea to stop importing US beef, a major source of short ribs for kal bi. US short rib  prices plummeted. Once the embargo was lifted, prices shot right back up. 

Flooding in Europe years ago caused the US potato prices to sky rocket, we exported to Russia and the rest of Europe to capitalize on demand. Food buyers were essentially put on ration lists and were restricted in what they could buy. McDonalds being one of the few exceptions. 

Global markets effect us all. 

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2 hours ago, suegarn said:

Wow!  Why would anyone in Canada want to import Cuban langosta?  East Coast lobster, either from Nova Scotia or Prince Edward Island in Canada, or Maine lobster are the best!  Nothing else can compare!

This is why this forum can be both informative and annoying. My taste buds are very different from yours as proven in the past. I've had lobster, fresh off the docks, in P.E.I., Nova Scotia and Boston. These Cuban lobster tails blew my socks off. Have you ever tried them? If not, why does your opinion hold water?

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8 minutes ago, camillenparadise said:

Now all I want is Cuban lobster!!! It's cold and drizzling in Nayarit, north of PV, and I have a cold AND four fractured ribs and I am not a happy camper! Good on those who have the good stuff.....

Virtual box of chocolate being sent.  Get well soon!

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Soriana has huge lobster tails right now in their fish freezer. I really don't care what Rvgringo says. The Caribbean and Pacific spiny lobster is a lobster so what if it has no claws.You can snorkel for them in the rocks in the Florida Keys or Cuba. The famous Aussie Moreton Bay Bug is also a lobster and has no claws. The picture is our Pacific spiny lobster which is generally what you see for sale around here.

spiny_t658.jpg

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