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Rescued and now far from home. Can you help her?


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This beautiful, friendly, affectionate dog has had a hell of a day and needs help getting back home,   which is somewhere across the lake.  

Apparently, a woman who lives "across the lake" picked up the dog from a field next to her house and brought her to a Chapala shelter. The woman left the dog there even though they said they were full and couldn't take it.  The dog was then brought by someone from the shelter to Dr. Ladron's clinic to be euthanized , but since she is healthy and obviously someone's pet, the clinic will hold on to her for a while until her home, or home, is found.

This girl is about a year and a half old, healthy and very friendly.  She doesn't have a collar or a chip, but she was spayed 4-6 weeks ago. 

Obviously the rescuer thought she was helping the dog by taking her to a shelter, but the result is that the dog is now miles away from home and no one else knows where that might be.  And the owners of   the dog, who loved her enough to spay her, would have no reason to look all the way over here for their  dog.

The only way I can think of to help is to get the word out.  The best outcome would be if the rescuer  picked up the dog from Dr. Ladron's clinic and took her back to where she was found. Barring that, a   couple of things would help:  posting her picture on other dog-oriented area websites (are there any spanish-language ones used by the mexican community?), and taking her picture to any vets "across the lake" to  see if she's recognized.  I can email her picture to anyone - pm me.

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 The thought of someone's pet being euthanized with no chance to locate the owner is horrific. For many people, our worst nightmare. Thank you to Dr. Ladron's Clinic staff for recognizing that this was someone's pet and not proceeding with putting her down. The Ranch rescued her and has kindly offered to take her in and look after her until the owner has been located or if necessary to be adopted.

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People need to stop stealing dogs. Picking up a healthy dog that is not in distress or danger and taking it away is theft. STOP IT! That woman could have been responsible for the death of this animal. She is responsible for the distress of both the dog and her people. 

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Thank the folks at the Ranch for their compassion..I know how full they are but they always find a way. Unlike the other "ONE" who took her from their facility to be put down..I used to donate to them but never again..They house a large group of essentially non-adoptable dogs and there never seems to be any room at the Inn for new arrivals. They are a joke due to the boss..many of the people who work there are doing a great job despite the Heffe.

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There are different philosophies regarding no-kill animal shelters. Who's to say what's best? The "other shelter" takes in highly adoptable, mostly smaller dogs and had a high rate of adoption. That means many needy dogs find homes and this is good. We at the Ranch are less selective, take more large to medium-sized dogs, have a much larger facility, and, thanks to the community, our adoption rate has been steadily increasing. And this is good.

When I lived NOB, I volunteered for Corgi Rescue. Boulder Humane had a very stringent testing program for the dogs they would accept. A young Corgi didn't pass so they called us and I was sent to evaluate the dog. He was a sweetie who walked well on leash, was nice to other dogs and people so I recommended we accept him. Turns out he failed the test because he wouldn't allow them to touch his feet. The Humane Society didn't have to put him down. We found him a wonderful home so it was a win-win all around.

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Tomas, unless you are willing to take this dog (and the next one after that, and the next one after that...) into your home until an owner is found, you have no right to judge the people who dedicate hours and hours of effort each week to animal rescue. Shelters have to draw a line somewhere. Without ALL the lovely rescue shelters in the area we would be overrun with sick and starving and sometimes dangerous dogs. Unfortunately, there just aren't places for all of them. In the USA, shelters euthanize 1.5 million dogs a year, the vast majority due to human irresponsibility. 

Nobody should "rescue" a dog unless they are willing to keep that dog until the owner or a new home can be found, in case the shelters can't take the dog. The shelters can't do it all and some of the rescues are, as mentioned before, simply free-range dogs. 

 

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1 hour ago, luvsdawgs said:

Sorry, I agree with Tomas, too many are rejected by that shelter because of many reasons, one is not cute enough to be adopted quickly. They also will not accept any dogs on a Monday,  no black dogs, etc. What shelter does such a thing? Too many other things to post here.

The people devoting a large portion of their lives to dog rescue get to decide how best they can do it. Since there is tsunami of dogs needing rescue and limited resources there are only a small percentage of dogs that can be saved. All shelters have criteria for dogs they take in. This is especially true for no kill shelters where the dog will remain forever if not adopted. The Ranch had a dog for 11 years before it was adopted. And, here you do not entirely agree with Tomas. He criticized the shelter for housing  “a large group of essentially non-adoptable dogs.” You say they don’t take dogs who aren’t “cute enough to be adopted quickly.” What is it you two want? I am amazed at the time, effort and their own money all the shelter VOLUNTEERS put into doing the best they can to lessen the suffering of dogs here. Then when some princess from across the lake snatches a dog from its environment, the shelter people are expected to hop on it and relieve her of her self-imposed burden.

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Thank you Xena. With the closing of Anita's Animals we are reduced to three main shelters: Lucky Dog, Friends of Animals and the Ranch, with a variety of others, including several local Vets, taking in animals. The spay/neuter clinics had made a significant difference, but there are still way too many needy dogs and cats in the Lakeside area. Do I always agree with some of the decisions made? Of course not. But we are all in this together.

Several things could make a significant difference.

People need to stop stealing dogs pretending to rescue them. If the dog (or cat) isn't in danger, don't take. Leave it where it is. Period.

Once you "rescue" a dog, it becomes your responsibility. Don't expect to dump it off at an already overcrowded shelter.

People need to make a forever commitment to the dogs or cats they adopt. Don't just "adopt" for the winter or until something cuter comes along.

Spay or neuter your pets. Unless they are part of a planned breeding program, don't breed them. Getting an animal neutered is so inexpensive here compared to NOB there is no excuse.

Off the soapbox.

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I have been involved with dog shelters for many years, both here and in the US, and I am just so FED UP with people who have done little themselves to deal with the unwanted pet situation but are full of criticism for those that do! I invite those of you who apparently know it all to start their own shelters and show everyone how it's done. Until then please keep your negative opinions to yourselves. 

Mtn Mama, your posts are full of wisdom -- and also with much more patience than I have for these people.

Every shelter has the right to make its own decisions about what dogs to take. Here at Lakeside, they aren't government funded agencies. They're private non-profits with VOLUNTEER staff working hard to make life better for Lakeside animals. The different shelters have different philosophies but I can safely say that all of them make their decisions based on what they feel is best for the animal population. 

I have a friend whose friend worked in an animal shelter in Texas. It was a city pound, and the city council voted that the shelter MUST take every animal left there and MUST NOT euthanize except for extreme medical or behavior issues. Within six months the shelter was full of unadoptable animals. Leaving no place for adoptable animals to be left, to be able to find new homes. It had become a warehouse for unadoptable animals. Needless to say, the city council changed the policy.

Everywhere, there are way more unwanted animals than there are homes for them. Tough decisions simply must be made, and I give full credit and kudos to the people who don't shy away from making them.

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I too wish to thank you all for your very hard work running and operating the shelters. I have been here 20 years and have learned to greatly appreciate all of the work you do. Me? What do I do?  Not much. I do always have 3 adopted dogs and 3 adopted cats.

Thank you all again. And understand there will always be those who misunderstand what you are doing and criticize your efforts

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I fully agree with Mt. Mama.  I only hope that someone will step up and open another dog shelter.  Since Anita's closed there is an unfilled void.  When Theresa Jasper and her ilk criticized and tried to go around the govt. set limits, I suggested that they open a shelter.  She has been gone quite a while and I see no shelter that is so desperately needed.  I only hope people "rescuing" pets and then expecting someone else to take care of them will think about the animal and not how good about themselves they feel.  Perhaps the answer is to foster in place if a needful dog is seen.

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51 minutes ago, bmh said:

Anyone has any clue about the woman called Vera who adopted the dog in the first place? 

This was posted on Inside Lakeside.

There is a thread about a lost dog on TOB called 'Rescued and now far from . . .'  I do not post over there but if someone would post there that we know who the dog belongs to and are trying to get a hold of her. Just hold on to the dog and we'll get them back together.
TIA

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2 hours ago, bmh said:

Anyone has any clue about the woman called Vera who adopted the dog in the first place? 

The dog's name is Dolly and she will be picked up tomorrow from the Ranch and returned to her owner. A big shout out to Team Joco for getting this done. This is what we can do as a community.

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On 12/10/2017 at 12:11 PM, Xena said:

The people devoting a large portion of their lives to dog rescue get to decide how best they can do it. Since there is tsunami of dogs needing rescue and limited resources there are only a small percentage of dogs that can be saved. All shelters have criteria for dogs they take in. This is especially true for no kill shelters where the dog will remain forever if not adopted. The Ranch had a dog for 11 years before it was adopted. And, here you do not entirely agree with Tomas. He criticized the shelter for housing  “a large group of essentially non-adoptable dogs.” You say they don’t take dogs who aren’t “cute enough to be adopted quickly.” What is it you two want? I am amazed at the time, effort and their own money all the shelter VOLUNTEERS put into doing the best they can to lessen the suffering of dogs here. Then when some princess from across the lake snatches a dog from its environment, the shelter people are expected to hop on it and relieve her of her self-imposed burden.

I have devoted most of my life to dog rescue since I am down here and know the dogs which have been at the ranch for years. I also know of shelter refusing to accept dogs on Monday, that will not take black dogs, etc. I know what running a shelter entails, I know the hardship and the heartbreak. 

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“I know the hardship and the heartbreak.“ 

Then I am sure you also understand the being judged and how you so often can not get anything right no matter what you do, how you can not please everyone and sometimes no one. You know the need for compassion.

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