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Warning - avoid 'bone treats'


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Don't know if these are available down here, but ANY cooked bone should never ever be given to a dog. Raw bones only. A dog's stomach can digest raw bones but cooking or smoking changes the composition and the dog can no longer digest the bone. It can then splinter and puncture the insides of the dog or cat.

If I were king of the world, the CEOs of these companies would be boiled in oil - any company selling dog or cat related products should be aware of the safety hazards.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/fda-bone-treats-causing-dog-deaths-and-illnesses/

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Mt. Mama - thanks for the reminder and the link about the bone treats.

Dog owners should also be aware about the  extreme dangers of rawhide bones / chews . 

I stopped using them in 1969  after some research then  showed that the companies used arsenic  to soft the hides to make them easier for the dogs to chew, and put the hide in various shapes . Although arsenic might be considered ' organic', it is not a good thing.. it can and does accumulate in the  body and there were many reported deaths from this - autopsies done on the dead animals showed  this was the cause of death. 

China was at the top of the  list for this processing system, although I think it is still a common practice by other companies, even now.

 I was watching a TV commercial with a well know  ' animal expert'   promoting his dog treats.. in the commercial he ' just discovered ! '  saying that  his dog almost choked  to death           on the a raw hide chew.     I said to myself:   " what a revelation ",  but using other words, which I cannot write here .... you are an expert,  you dumb  #@$ ,  and  etc.. ...

not only is there  a chocking potential, there is a potential for a bowel obstruction,    which might require surgery IF   recognized early enough, or cause  a terrible death                              Please educate yourself about what you give your dogs as treats.. it may save their life.

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I bought my dog one of those rawhide chews just before a long car trip back to Canada, thinking it would entertain her on the journey. She wasn't the least bit interested in it. When I got to Canada, I soaked it in water for awhile, thinking it might bring out the flavor and make it more palatable if it was softer. She totally started chewing on it. Then within a couple of days she started gagging and coughing and throwing up bile- when I examined it, I found a lot of rough hard edges and figured that bits of it had scratched her throat. I threw the thing in the garbage.

When I got back to Mexico, I bought her a new one. She took one sniff of it and immediately started throwing up bile again.

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NOB I quit feeding my dogs raw bones when one of my dogs had to be put under to have two molars removed that were broken by chewing bones. He said never give your dogs bones- period.

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4 hours ago, cedros said:

NOB I quit feeding my dogs raw bones when one of my dogs had to be put under to have two molars removed that were broken by chewing bones. He said never give your dogs bones- period.

The idea that dogs shouldn't be given real, raw bones is bizarre. That is what they would be chewing on naturally.

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12 hours ago, mudgirl said:

The idea that dogs shouldn't be given real, raw bones is bizarre. That is what they would be chewing on naturally.

That is what I said to my vet. I said what about wolves they chew bones. His reply-yes but they only live about 7 years on average so their teeth don't need to last near as long as our per dogs need healthy teeth.

""Oftentimes, dogs enjoy chewing so much that they will overdo it and can cause dental trauma to the mouth." Bones, hooves and antlers are rigid and may lead to chipped or broken teeth, according to Dr. Evans. Bones can splinter and pierce the dog's mouth or become a choking hazard."

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Actually, a quick google search tells me that while the average life span of a wolf is about 7 years, but that is just because they have a difficult life in the wild, and can live up to 13 years in captivity, a few having lived up to 20 years. So not that different from a dog. I'll continue to give my dog raw, large bones, which she loves. I don't expect her to have perfect teeth at the age of 10 anymore than most 70 year old people have perfect teeth.

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