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Greetings!

I've already received a lot of clarification through this webboard - so thanks!

Here is our situation. I am moving with my aunt to the Chapala area so that she can move into a nursing home in San Antonio. I have a place to stay through February and have been checking rental options and am confident that I can find something by March. She gets $1845 a month in Social Security. I get roughly $1250 but have savings that I can draw from if need be. I am worried that immigration might not grant us temporary or permanent residence because we don't have enough money. 

If we have managed until now to live in the US with this income, I know we can manage in Chapala! 

What concerns me is that I don't want to turn into one of those gringas who stays on a tourist visa indefinitely as I do plan to live in Mexico. More concerning still is I can't expect to drag my poor aunt from the nursing home up to Ciudad Juarez/El Paso to get her tourist visa stamped every six months. How can anyone expect an elderly person to do that?

I have asked previously about power of attorney and understand that with US power of attorney I shouldn't have any trouble getting similar documents in Mexico. My next question is: If my aunt can't get temporary or permanent residence, can I bring her visa with me as her power of attorney when I go to renew mine if I can't get some kind of resident visa? What if she can't get residence and I can and explain that I am responsible for her and will compensate financially for anything that her social security check can't cover. Is that an option?

Now that the new level of care my aunt needs is beyond our financial means,  I am so happy to have found her a lovely place to live out her last years. I too am looking forward to a more relaxed and pleasant lifestyle in the future and, from what I have seen, heard and read, Chapala really does offer that.

Any advice will be greatly appreciated!

Many thanks in advance!

 

 

 

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With your aunt's income I see no reason she should not qualify for a pre-approved TR visa. You may as well on the lower income but also take 12 months of bank statements showing savings. It depends on the person at the consulate. Many consulates do need appointments, one per person.

For an elderly person with the inability to travel an humanitarian visa is an option. I process several a year. INM cost is zero but some extra steps and Spencer can help you. I cover humanitarian visas here: http://www.soniadiaz.mx/immigration---visas.html

The only time one really has to go to Inmigracion is finger prints and some INM offices will come to the applicant for them. In some cases I have clients waiting in  a car and INM comes outside as our INM offices has two sets of steps. Again, Spencer can represent your aunt when time comes to submit the documents to INM and to pick up her visa. If she is ever unable to sign then a thumb prints is accepted.

 

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Margo, I sent you a PM the other day. Have you read it?

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Thanks, Natasha.

I tried to find it just now to see if l read it. I usually  respond when I get responses or questions, so if I didn’t, I probably didn’t see yours.

All of these sites work a little bit differently. Where should l look?

Thanks!

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I'm not Natasha, but....  at the top of each page there is an 'envelop' and a 'bell'..... assuming that you are 'logged in'.  If one of those on your page has a red "1" on it, that means that you have one message that can be read.

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Have you spoken with the owners of the nursing home , what do they recommend. Are they fussed about having her correctly documented.

I know of a couple nursing home  situations were the people are in their late 80 and early 90's and they have not bothered to renew their status. I am not sure what they do for any medical treatments, I guess just pay as you go

 

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20 hours ago, lakeside7 said:

Have you spoken with the owners of the nursing home , what do they recommend. Are they fussed about having her correctly documented.

I know of a couple nursing home  situations were the people are in their late 80 and early 90's and they have not bothered to renew their status. I am not sure what they do for any medical treatments, I guess just pay as you go

 

The nursing home can lose their license and should (assuming they are legal and have one) if residents have no visa. The humanitarian visa I delivered yesterday at a senior's center  was for a woman who turned 100 today. 

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I did not have time to get my aunt's documents in order prior to her departure, so I cannot get the temporal for her. I applied myself because I am finishing up all the business here in the US before I leave. I will meet her at my brother's in Mexico City and then we drive to Chapala. She is set to move into the assisted living place on Dec. 1. I do not want to have to take her out of the country again in less than 6 months after having moved her around so much.

How would I go about helping her to get a humanitarian visa in Chapala?

Thanks so much for this incredibly useful information, Sonia!

 

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8 hours ago, Margo Morado said:

I did not have time to get my aunt's documents in order prior to her departure, so I cannot get the temporal for her. I applied myself because I am finishing up all the business here in the US before I leave. I will meet her at my brother's in Mexico City and then we drive to Chapala. She is set to move into the assisted living place on Dec. 1. I do not want to have to take her out of the country again in less than 6 months after having moved her around so much.

How would I go about helping her to get a humanitarian visa in Chapala?

Thanks so much for this incredibly useful information, Sonia!

 

Spencer McMullen is the only person I know who processes humanitarian visas at lakeside. Personally I am working on 4 right now as almost no other person knows how to do so in SMA.

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