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The Five Year Plan


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7 minutes ago, gringal said:

Comment on "Gringo Bubble":  this is generally reverse snobbery on the part of people who don't live in Ajijic.  As you will see for yourself when you visit, the Ajijic population is in fact, primarily Mexican and there are many very modest dwellings.  The true "bubbles" are mostly found in the various gated communities all over the Lake Chapala area.  Nothing wrong with those,  and they have a lot to offer the residents in amenities. Personally, I prefer living right in town, walking distance to everything.  Each to his or her own.

Wishing you the best of luck in finding your happy home.

Good information on health insurance.

On the Gringo Bubble, that's an interesting take. Would the people who do not live in Ajijic be living behind the gates in their McMansions? lol

Are their properties that are for rent with some elbow room. Not many neighbors? For some reason, Terrie wants chickens.

:)

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Such negative comments of Mexican people. All a gated community does is give you a false sense of security. A community does not have to gated to be regulated.

As someone who lives in a  gated community, I must say that that if I told my Mexican neighbors that you think they are a cancer on society they would laugh at you.  There is a lot to be said about no

IMSS does not "rule out" pre-existing conditions.  Rather it applies a waiting period during which they are not coverd.  IMHO if you're going to live here dump Medicare part B, part A is no-cost.

26 minutes ago, Cactus Jack said:

Good information on health insurance.

On the Gringo Bubble, that's an interesting take. Would the people who do not live in Ajijic be living behind the gates in their McMansions? lol

Are their properties that are for rent with some elbow room. Not many neighbors? For some reason, Terrie wants chickens.

:)

Not the McMansion  people, as far as I know. (rofl)

She wants chickens?  I'd say the outlying country areas.  There is that kind of property, especially out in the Jocotepec area.  Also, it's a good area to find reasonable rentals.  Just don't move next door to me with your dang roosters.:lol:

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1 minute ago, gringal said:

She wants chickens?  I'd say the outlying country areas.  There is that kind of property, especially out in the Jocotepec area.  Also, it's a good area to find reasonable rentals.  Just don't move next door to me with your dang roosters.:lol:

I'm a dedicated morning person, while Terrie loves to sleep. I love sunrise and sunset and don't care much about the night. You probably have experience with roosters. I did in Worcester, MA, too!

You know, I'll be really interested in seeing those gated communities. I wonder if they are like the ones in Florida, which should be outlawed immediately. They are a cancer on society. They do not assimilate. (In FLorida). I wouldn't want to be one of those people, and wouldn't like it if I wanted to be one. It's not a community, but what one looks like to those who have settled. The thing they do best is bitch about the locals. I've had plenty of them, I tell ya.

:)

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47 minutes ago, Cactus Jack said:

No kidding?! That's excellente, amigo!

You probably have a different perspective which we'd find useful. What do you see with people like us moving to Mexico? Where do you see us struggling? Language? Customs? Assimilating?

Thanks. Sounds like you've found a way.

First, language. Does either of you speak Spanish? If not, it may limit where you feel comfortable.

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44 minutes ago, Cactus Jack said:

This is probably a sensitive subject to some people and might raise some strong opinions, but I ran across a line this week which I'd like to confirm.

A person living on a modest retirement income will be upper-middle class in Mexico.

Depends on what you mean by modest.  Generally no, you would not be like upper middle class in Mexico.

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1 minute ago, Tiny said:

First, language. Does either of you speak Spanish? If not, it may limit where you feel comfortable.

A goal. We both have people at work who love to help us practice. A big advantage we have is living right in the barrio of Las Vegas. Most of the stores in our area are latino. 

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Everyone struggles with languages, but it is fun.  You should not struggle with anything else, or it can ruin your enjoyment of life. Mexico is different. Accept it, adopt it, study it and apreciate it. Otherwise, you will be an unhappy camper. There are quite a few of those, unfortunately.

Yes, you can live on less what the Mexican government requires you to prove for a residence visa.  It won‘t be high on the hog, but it will be a lot of fun.  We did it.  “We“ includes just me and wife #3 of 26 years. She was never able to work much and has no pension. Mine is miniscule, as are both our SS checks, which total less than the average individual‘s check these days.  Really old folks worked for good wages, back in the day, but those wages are now at poverty level. Sadly, those old wages dictate our tiny pensions and SS payments.  Yes, we kept Medicare A&B, and are glad we did, as advanced age and infirmity drove us north to use them, and the VA.   If you recall the Boy Scouts marching song:  Be Prepared !

In Mexico, we bought, never rented, and had a weekly maid and gardener.  Took a few nice road trips, vacationed a few times at the Pacific beaches, etc.  Life was good; better than it is now, here in Tucson a few days from 80.

Do it while you can.  Go with the flow and you won‘t regret it.

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27 minutes ago, AngusMactavish said:

If you live and eat like a Mexican.

 

1 minute ago, El Saltos said:

Depends on what you mean by modest.  Generally no, you would not be like upper middle class in Mexico.

I believe you are both correct. How to define your space is part of the challenge, right? How much of Mexico do we want to absorb? Any? As little as possible, or as much as we can become Mexican? How resistant am we? These are existential questions.

What do I want, what can I pay for, and how much am I willing to forego? Finding the balance, and knowing that in time we adapt very well. (And keep reminding ourselves.)

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1 minute ago, Cactus Jack said:

A goal. We both have people at work who love to help us practice. A big advantage we have is living right in the barrio of Las Vegas. Most of the stores in our area are latino. 

So what are you doing here. Go practice. hahaha It will help so you are not limited. I only know cerveza, grande, más, baño and taco. But I have several tricks.

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Cactus Jack,

since you are on a five year plan i would suggest that you open a "my Social Security" account at https://www.ssa.gov/site/signin/en/  This can only be initiated from within the U.S. and can make some things simpler. Also, open a Duolingo account and start studying Spanish, it's free and I find it fun, too. https://www.duolingo.com/ 

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1 hour ago, El Saltos said:

Depends on what you mean by modest.  Generally no, you would not be like upper middle class in Mexico.

El Saltos raises a good point. There is an enormous financial gap between working class Mexicans and an upper middle class Mexican.

I have upper middle class Mexican friends and they fly to the US in family planes. They send their children to schools in Switzerland.

I have a middle class friend in Ajijic. She has her own business, a cook and a housekeeper, and a car for everyone in the family. She and her husband and children fly commercial airlines when they travel to the US, Asia, and Europe.

I have some upper class Mexican acquaintances and they live lives I can only dream about. I have upper class Mexican acquaintances because I share a hobby with them.

I live in Ajijic and lots of the neighbors have chickens. I do not live in a gated community. 

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3 hours ago, Cactus Jack said:

I'm a dedicated morning person, while Terrie loves to sleep. I love sunrise and sunset and don't care much about the night. You probably have experience with roosters. I did in Worcester, MA, too!

You know, I'll be really interested in seeing those gated communities. I wonder if they are like the ones in Florida, which should be outlawed immediately. They are a cancer on society. They do not assimilate. (In FLorida). I wouldn't want to be one of those people, and wouldn't like it if I wanted to be one. It's not a community, but what one looks like to those who have settled. The thing they do best is bitch about the locals. I've had plenty of them, I tell ya.

:)

As someone who lives in a  gated community, I must say that that if I told my Mexican neighbors that you think they are a cancer on society they would laugh at you.  There is a lot to be said about not having break-ins, not having to have bars on the windows, not having to have broken glass on the walls, not having to have electrical fence on top of walls. etc.  There is something to be said for not living in an  unregulated neighborhood where an ironworker can set up shop next door to you, along with all the terrible noise his business requires. There is something to be said for the property next door not being able to become a dog sanctuary with 60 dogs barking at all hours of the day and night.  There is something to be said when the lot across from you which you look at daily, can not have starving horses in it, with their ribs hanging out and no access to water.  There is something to be said for  the lot next door to you not being allowed to run wild with weeds growing 8 feet high, populated by vermin.  There is something to be said for not being in a village where cohetes go off at all hours of the day and night during fiestas.  Our Mexican neighbors could tell you all this.  Don't fool yourself into thinking that there are no Mexicans also enjoying the safety and comfort of a gated community, Cactus Jack.  It's all a matter of personal choice ( and budget ) and many Mexicans prefer to live in gated communities too.

When the people in the gated communities in Florida  bitch about "the locals", who are they referring to?   Are they not all Floridians if they live there?

 

 

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5 hours ago, Cactus Jack said:

This is probably a sensitive subject to some people and might raise some strong opinions, but I ran across a line this week which I'd like to confirm.

A person living on a modest retirement income will be upper-middle class in Mexico.

Solid upper middle class in Mexico is not what you might think. A house alone would cost you about $7,000,000 to $15,000,000 pesos or a mínimum of $400,000 USDs plus newer vehicles, vacations, socializing,  nicer restaurants etc. about another $35,000 to $45,000 USDs per year.

A modest retirement income from the US or Canada would put you into middle class or upper working class depending if you have thousands in savings to buy a house etc. Around $2,500 to $3,500 USDs per month retirement income only and renting  would be comfortable at the moment but not be upper middle class anymore here. IMO

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50 minutes ago, gimpychimp said:

 

When the people in the gated communities in Florida  bitch about "the locals", who are they referring to?   Are they not all Floridians if they live there?

 

 

They might be bitching about "the local [raised and educated in Florida] Rednecks and Evangelists." :)

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2 hours ago, gimpychimp said:

As someone who lives in a  gated community, I must say that that if I told my Mexican neighbors that you think they are a cancer on society they would laugh at you.  There is a lot to be said about not having break-ins, not having to have bars on the windows, not having to have broken glass on the walls, not having to have electrical fence on top of walls. etc.  There is something to be said for not living in an  unregulated neighborhood where an ironworker can set up shop next door to you, along with all the terrible noise his business requires. There is something to be said for the property next door not being able to become a dog sanctuary with 60 dogs barking at all hours of the day and night.  There is something to be said when the lot across from you which you look at daily, can not have starving horses in it, with their ribs hanging out and no access to water.  There is something to be said for  the lot next door to you not being allowed to run wild with weeds growing 8 feet high, populated by vermin.  There is something to be said for not being in a village where cohetes go off at all hours of the day and night during fiestas.  Our Mexican neighbors could tell you all this.  Don't fool yourself into thinking that there are no Mexicans also enjoying the safety and comfort of a gated community, Cactus Jack.  It's all a matter of personal choice ( and budget ) and many Mexicans prefer to live in gated communities too.

When the people in the gated communities in Florida  bitch about "the locals", who are they referring to?   Are they not all Floridians if they live there?

 

 

I have nothing against gated communities nor with anyone who chooses to live within.  But, with the description you give of life ‘outside’ that gated community, I can understand why you have chosen to live in one.... It’s a horrible world out there. 

 

 

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14 hours ago, gimpychimp said:

As someone who lives in a  gated community, I must say that that if I told my Mexican neighbors that you think they are a cancer on society they would laugh at you.  There is a lot to be said about not having break-ins, not having to have bars on the windows, not having to have broken glass on the walls, not having to have electrical fence on top of walls. etc.  There is something to be said for not living in an  unregulated neighborhood where an ironworker can set up shop next door to you, along with all the terrible noise his business requires. There is something to be said for the property next door not being able to become a dog sanctuary with 60 dogs barking at all hours of the day and night.  There is something to be said when the lot across from you which you look at daily, can not have starving horses in it, with their ribs hanging out and no access to water.  There is something to be said for  the lot next door to you not being allowed to run wild with weeds growing 8 feet high, populated by vermin.  There is something to be said for not being in a village where cohetes go off at all hours of the day and night during fiestas.  Our Mexican neighbors could tell you all this.  Don't fool yourself into thinking that there are no Mexicans also enjoying the safety and comfort of a gated community, Cactus Jack.  It's all a matter of personal choice ( and budget ) and many Mexicans prefer to live in gated communities too.

When the people in the gated communities in Florida  bitch about "the locals", who are they referring to?   Are they not all Floridians if they live there?

 

 

Such negative comments of Mexican people. All a gated community does is give you a false sense of security. A community does not have to gated to be regulated.

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1 hour ago, Tiny said:

Such negative comments of Mexican people. All a gated community does is give you a false sense of security.

This is an absolutely untrue statement.  Gimpychimp's comment are the truth.  He is not commenting on Mexican people but on the lack of zoning restrictions.  His comments describe the reality that folks in the villages live.  I gather that Tiny either doesn't live her or hasn't been here long enough to understand the reality of village life.

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16 hours ago, gimpychimp said:

There is a lot to be said about not having break-ins, not having to have bars on the windows, not having to have broken glass on the walls, not having to have electrical fence on top of walls. etc. 

 

 

Sorry, I just found these comments negative. Just like thinking that someone is ugly. While it may true, there is no reason to say it. I didn't say untrue.

It seemed to me that they were implying that the community had to be gated to be regulated. 

I didn't see the mention of village life. There is other life besides village life. We have been in the City over 20 years. Just a "newbie" here.

I guess I need to start looking for some horses in 8 foot grass.

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