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Andres Nuñez not long ago did excellent work on a difficult painting job for us. With recent rainy weather and two children going back to school, this single dad is giving a special offer this month on painting jobs--20 pesos an hour. Bonus: he speaks good English. His phone: 331-742-83-92.

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I would never pay a guy that does excellent work 20 pesos per hour.  What does he normally charge?  I have all the tools and equipment including high quality brushes and every size of ladder up to 8 meters.  Trouble is, I can't get to this until some time in October but once it gets rolling, it is a big job painting this house.

I am really picky about prep, masking, drop clothes and thorough brushing.  He needs to be OK with some supervision.  I'm an expert and very meticulous painter and have not been very happy with anyone I've hired for this work thus far.

 

 

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Please.............   before you judge, could you please read Deborah's post just above, "Need a Painter?" and then my response to it.

When Andres Nuñez came to my door approx. 4 months ago, it was the day after the night his wife could not breathe. An experienced house painter of many years he quoted me 60 pesos/hr. which is more realistic. It is obvious with the "special offer of 20 pesos/hr",  he is now desperate! Very desperate.

To have him come to you for a day to test his skills would be a very gracious and honourable gesture. I am almost positive he would know all about "prep, masking, drop sheets and brushing",  along with fancy tools, equipment, 8 metre ladder and quality brushes. Please pay his bus fare as it is obvious why he was hitching a ride. Then, by all means, do come back to us with a report.

Andres is a kind, gentle man who has just lost his wife and mother of two young children. He is very proud, not asking for a hand-out - only to be working again - perhaps within a network of people who have it in them to reach out and be supportive. He will even wash your car to gain a little bit of self-pride.

Have a heart.

(In case you were asking), as far as myself, I've been under raw construction for that length of time and haven't as yet arrived at the painting stage. However, have kept his contact info with good intention - and indeed is very good to hear "tombo" speak so well of him. Andres will need to build self-esteem and confidence as his skills have obviously been tested in his own testament. Undoubtedly, he will try that much harder to please someone as professional as yourself.

 

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I'm not judging.  I wish I could put the guy to work right now but I can't.  If I could I would pay him at least 60 pesos per hour and if he's really good, more than that.  Hopefully one of you can and if so pay him at least that.  I would never take advantage of his desperation and I hope others don't either, that was my point.

I've got to finish rounding up the stuff for a major project, painting the exterior of a big and very vertical house and also there has to be some more plaster repair before we're ready to paint.  In the interim, there's some long planned travel first.

OK?

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Andres worked for me last year. I won't comment on his work at this time as the job he did for me may not be reflective of his current work.

I would advise all to be wary and skeptical of his sad stories. 

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14 hours ago, tombo said:

Andres Nuñez not long ago did excellent work on a difficult painting job for us. With recent rainy weather and two children going back to school, this single dad is giving a special offer this month on painting jobs--20 pesos an hour. Bonus: he speaks good English. His phone: 331-742-83-92.

Thanks Tombo. I hope he finds work soon. I have also posted in several facebook groups, with a couple of cautiously optimistic results.

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8 hours ago, John Shrall said:

Andres worked for me last year. I won't comment on his work at this time as the job he did for me may not be reflective of his current work.

I would advise all to be wary and skeptical of his sad stories. 

"Sad stories" aside, the reality is that he is raising these children alone and is actively seeking work John. I am sorry that you were less than satisfied with his work for you last year. For others who might be seeking a painter, he has several excellent local references to provide to you, all of whom you can telephone to double-check. I hope this man finds some work soon.

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11 hours ago, John Shrall said:

Andres worked for me last year. I won't comment on his work at this time as the job he did for me may not be reflective of his current work.

I would advise all to be wary and skeptical of his sad stories. 

Thank you for posting this, John.  I knew I had heard this sad story from a man a few years ago who came to my door telling me he had just arrived from Florida, wife was deceased or in hospital, can't remember which, but he was begging me for work to support his children and had papers signed by people that he said he had worked for in lakeside. Nicest guy in the world. Very humble. Seemed terribly desperate. I think he said he was living in his car then. Almost broke my heart to listen to his story.

I  guess it is remotely possible that this is not that man, but the heartbreaking story is so unusual and unique that it does make me wonder. 

Strange.

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We are unfortunately going to be dealing with this, perhaps more often than we used to, because of the many people who have returned from up north. It is very difficult to make a judgment, when the person seems sincere and troubled.

My favourite was a woman trolling the streets of Chapala some years back, looking for money to get a coffin for her husband. That was a new one on me. My least favourite was a waiter at Brissi's, before they moved to their current location, who had a story very similar to that of Sr. Nuñez. We gave him food, and offered him work. He was lousy at everything, even though he claimed to have spent 10 years in California doing every aspect of construction. We paid him for a day's work, and expected him back the next morning to continue. He disappeared for a week. When he came back, it was pretty obvious that he had simply drunk his way through the money.

Unfortunately, incidents like these have left me completely skeptical, and when the doorbell rings, I ignore it most of the time. I didn't used to be this way.

Edited by ComputerGuy
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38 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

We are unfortunately going to be dealing with this, perhaps more often than we used to, because of the many people who have returned from up north. It is very difficult to make a judgment, when the person seems sincere and troubled.

My favourite was a woman trolling the streets of Chapala some years back, looking for money to get a coffin for her husband. That was a new one on me. My least favourite was a waiter at Brissi's, before they moved to their current location, who had a story very similar to that of Sr. Nuñez. We gave him food, and offered him work. He was lousy at everything, even though he claimed to have spent 10 years in California doing every aspect of construction. We paid him for a day's work, and expected him back the next morning to continue. He disappeared for a week. When he came back, it was pretty obvious that he had simply drunk his way through the money.

Unfortunately, incidents like these have left me completely skeptical, and when the doorbell rings, I ignore it most of the time. I didn't used to be this way.

You know Mike... I am skeptical too. But at the end of the day this man is looking for work, and regardless of his story ,  he is simply trying to support his children. I'll accept the risk of getting scammed if it means there's a possibility to help someone genuinely in need.

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One of the most respected posters on this board (legal wise) some time ago posted a message that I still remember the gist of. He said if you encounter a young to middle age Mexican male who speaks very good English, the chances are quite high that he learned that English in the States and he would probably not be back in Mexico voluntarily. Since very few people are deported after being there long enough to learn English for simply not having papers, you might, if you so choose, assume they were involved in something serious enough to warrant expulsion. He pointed out that is not always the case but that those in that position will generally concoct a story to explain innocently why they are back.  Caveat Emptor.

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I agree with ComputerGuy. We have dealt with this type of thing too many times before (and yes it will become more and more common in the near future). Those of us who have been here awhile have grown skeptical for good reasons. Sadly, there are many compassionate people here who so want to help they are easy marks. This is not to say this young man is a con. I sincerely hope his story is true and that people's kindness and caring will not be taken advantage of. 

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1 hour ago, DeborahM said:

You know Mike... I am skeptical too. But at the end of the day this man is looking for work, and regardless of his story ,  he is simply trying to support his children. I'll accept the risk of getting scammed if it means there's a possibility to help someone genuinely in need.

Sorry, did not mean to imply that this man was of the wrong ilk... just a note that, as you know, there are reasons for people to be suspicious. Our guy was obviously in need of work, and the food we gave him included a pile of canned and packaged goods, not just a hot meal.. along with baby food for his youngest. But, he had been in the States so long, he had seemingly lost his worth ethic (let alone his "skills").

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No, I am saying that they get paid a lot more up there, and get accustomed to what some would call "the good life"... and when they come back here, pay is lousy, work is scarce, goods are harder to come by... and they want more, but they don't seem willing to "go for it" and make it work. This is not a blanket condemnation; this is in reference to those who live this way.

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Oh, for heaven's sake, either hire the guy or let this go. You don't know this man or the partriculars of his difficult life, you are just using him as a pawn to bolster your opinions.

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2 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

No, I am saying that they get paid a lot more up there, and get accustomed to what some would call "the good life"... and when they come back here, pay is lousy, work is scarce, goods are harder to come by... and they want more, but they don't seem willing to "go for it" and make it work. This is not a blanket condemnation; this is in reference to those who live this way.

Mike...truly...this is NOT "this guy." He is NOT expecting "the good life" here. He simply wants to support his kids...HERE...in his native country...for so much LESS than the earnings he could make in the US.  Give the guy a break.

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I.AM.HAPPY!! I posted this to several ex-pat facebook groups in Mexico as well, and this fellow has found THREE painting jobs since yesterday...one for three months...inside and outside...and two short term...but hopefully this will give him more references, and they might lead to more work...right? You know, I have seen SO MANY folks comment with words similar to "...beware of scammers..." yep...I wasn't born yesterday, and I DO realize that there is an element of healthy and necessary skepticism in this old world...BUT...I will err on the side of accepting a risk and helping a fellow human being feed his kids. Yep. Always.

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16 hours ago, John Shrall said:

Andres worked for me last year. I won't comment on his work at this time as the job he did for me may not be reflective of his current work.

I would advise all to be wary and skeptical of his sad stories. 

Yeah okay...BUT...he's just trying to support his kids John..."sad stories aside..." I am HAPPY that work is coming his way. I hope that the new folks who are taking a risk with him ight be happier with his work than you were. And if they're NOT...that'll get around too, right?

 

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I have no idea whether this person is a scammer or not and don't care. In general however, Mexican scammers thank their lucky stars that there seems to be a never-ending supply of NOBers who "just want to help a poor soul............ you fill in the blank". Learning the "hard way" for some is the only way. Those saying "be careful" are really just the uncaring, right?

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1 hour ago, DeborahM said:

Mike...truly...this is NOT "this guy." He is NOT expecting "the good life" here. He simply wants to support his kids...HERE...in his native country...for so much LESS than the earnings he could make in the US.  Give the guy a break.

But you know I wasn't referring to him. Skeptics stepped in, and I was simply reflecting that it can be tough to know for sure.

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Deborah, I admire your willingness to take a chance on this guy. Also for recommending him to others, vouching for him if you will. I have a friend who took the word of a good friend who truly believed the guy she was recommending was (in her own words) "the real deal."  They both got taken for a not insignificant sum of money. These are intelligent, savvy women, not easily duped. The guy was that good. Again, I am not saying your guy is not a perfectly fine man. I don't know him. I and others are just offering a word of general caution, especially for newcomers who may read this. I will now bow out of this thread. Thank you for your compassion and lack of cynicism.  

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Mexicans in general take much more time before they label anyone as bueno or malo. They watch, they wait and then they wait some more. They seem much more world-wise. When they decide, they think they have made a mature informed decision. Contrast that with many of the NOBers.

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9 hours ago, pappysmarket said:

One of the most respected posters on this board (legal wise) some time ago posted a message that I still remember the gist of. He said if you encounter a young to middle age Mexican male who speaks very good English, the chances are quite high that he learned that English in the States and he would probably not be back in Mexico voluntarily. Since very few people are deported after being there long enough to learn English for simply not having papers, you might, if you so choose, assume they were involved in something serious enough to warrant expulsion. He pointed out that is not always the case but that those in that position will generally concoct a story to explain innocently why they are back.  Caveat Emptor.

With what is currently happening in the US re ICE, immigration "sweeps", etc. while this may have been true in the past, it is sadly not true now. There are many Mexicans, who have lived up north for many years and speak English, who have either been deported, or have left before they will or might be. There are some in my community- upstanding folks with a good work ethic,  just never legally immigrated and were caught and deported.

As for how to know if someone is scamming or not, sometimes it's hard, but there are safeguards. Just because someone tells you their mom died last month and their wife is sick in the hospital, for instance, I would never just believe their story- I would check it out to determine if it was really true. One of my rules of thumb is, no one works for me if I don't know where they live. Not just them telling me where they live, but I actually KNOW where they live.

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