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New competition for Pemex in the GDL area


Mainecoons
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Interesting Informador article about a new chain of gas stations in the GDL area.  The article claims there is one somewhere in the Jocotepec area as well, in the 7th paragraph of the article.  Has anyone there seen this one?  Although the prices are still fixed the chain is guaranteeing no short pumping, a common problem.

Also some discussion of the possibility of gas shortages due to the problems in Texas.

http://www.informador.com.mx/economia/2017/737697/6/estrenan-identidad-estaciones-de-gasmex.htm

 

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Gasoline is gasoline, refined from crude oil and sent through pipelines to storage facilities and mixed with that from other refineries. It may then be piped onward to other distant storage or delivery locations, and eventually to individual gasoline stations.  The stations themselves may, or may not, be branded and paying a fee for that brand‘s sign and logos, advertizing, etc.  Independents down the street may actually be selling the same gasoline, from the same distributor and the same truckload, but without a branded contract; therefore, they sell for less per gallon.

It is all smoke and mirrors, but about 15% of Americans actually believe that their cars run better because they use their favorite brand........Ha!    Marketing magic, sometimes augmented by local additives of doubtful benefit; sort of like food coloring in jello, other than the additives that change the octane rating, which is real......most of the time.

Much of Mexico‘s Pemex gasoline is refined in Texas and imported. The same will be true for Gulf and BP, etc.  In fact, Mexico sent some gasoline back to Texas to help with the shortages caused by Harvey, and to help prevent excessive price increases nationwide in the USA.  Governments at work cooperatively?  Could be.

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3 hours ago, RVGRINGO said:

Gasoline is gasoline, refined from crude oil and sent through pipelines to storage facilities and mixed with that from other refineries. It may then be piped onward to other distant storage or delivery locations, and eventually to individual gasoline stations.  The stations themselves may, or may not, be branded and paying a fee for that brand‘s sign and logos, advertizing, etc.  Independents down the street may actually be selling the same gasoline, from the same distributor and the same truckload, but without a branded contract; therefore, they sell for less per gallon.

It is all smoke and mirrors, but about 15% of Americans actually believe that their cars run better because they use their favorite brand........Ha!    Marketing magic, sometimes augmented by local additives of doubtful benefit; sort of like food coloring in jello, other than the additives that change the octane rating, which is real......most of the time.

Much of Mexico‘s Pemex gasoline is refined in Texas and imported. The same will be true for Gulf and BP, etc.  In fact, Mexico sent some gasoline back to Texas to help with the shortages caused by Harvey, and to help prevent excessive price increases nationwide in the USA.  Governments at work cooperatively?  Could be.

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"Gasoline is gasoline, refined from crude oil and sent through pipelines to storage facilities and mixed with that from other refineries."

Are you proposing that gasoline from cracking & refining  heavy high-sulfur crude  is the same as gasoline from  light sweet West Texas crude?

Should we expect that winter-formulated (high volatility)  gasoline   is the same   as summer-formulated (low volatility) gasoline?

Should we expect that gasolines formulated for low altitudes (higher octane ratings for sea level sales) are the same as  high-altitude formulations for sale  in Mexico City  (lower octane ratings)?

======================================================
Univ. of Illinois Results for Different Brands of Gasoline:
We did our first Gas Chromatographic (GC) analyses on gasolines from 4 different local stations (different brands) at University of Illinois back in the early 1970's,  and each station's gasoline had a distinct signature of different hydrocarbons, present at very different amounts, very different from the other 3.

Colorado State University Results:
We repeated these GC analyses of 5 different brands of gasoline at Colorado State University in the early and again in the late 1980's and found that each of the 5 brands of gasoline from our local stations had unique signature compositions, that were each very different from the other 4 brands. ... Further, the Colorado gasolines were  also   different than the chemical signatures of the Illinois gasolines.

Alfred University Results:
We repeated these GC analyses of 4 yet still different brand of gasoline at Alfred University in the late 1980's, and found that each of the 4 brands of gasoline from our local upstate New York stations had unique signature compositions, that were each very different from the other 4 local upstate NY brands.  Further, the upstate NY gasolines were  also   different than the chemical signatures of the Illinois gasolines and the Colorado gasolines.

Analytical Technologies Laboratories Results:
We repeated these GC analysis, adding GC Mass Spectroscopy testing results,  and found that Arizona, Colorado,  New Mexico, Florida ,California, and Mexican sold gasoline brands were different from each other.

Paragon Analytics Results:
We repeated these GC analysis, adding GC Mass Spectroscopy testing results,  at Paragon Analytics, and found that Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexican, Kansas, Massachusetts,  Texas and Italian sold gasoline brands were distinctly different from each other.

As a result of 40 years of gasoline analyses from at least 12 different states and 3 different countries, I've personally seen testing results that showed that gasoline formulations vary between brands, between refineries, and between states. ... The source of   feedstock crude,   the catalyst & catalytic conditions,  the sulfur content,  the differing refining conditions,     winter vs summer gasoline blends,   and   specific additives  all contribute to chemically~scientifically measurable differences between different brands   and different types of gasolines.

 

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2 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

So you're saying they did tell you, however?

.
Rather than adopting personal opinions of local forum pundits,  why not consider  following  official public statements from BP ,  that have specifically announced~highlighted  that they are  not  selling PEMEX gas.

" This would also reportedly mark the first fueling location in Mexico to be operated and branded by a multinational oil company, as well as ~the first not supplied by its state oil company Pemex~ ,  since the country began deregulating its fuel market in 2013.  " 

"... BP, previously known as British Petroleum, yesterday opened its first gas station in Mexico, reportedly the only one in the country that  ~sells fuel that is not supplied by the state oil company Pemex ~ . "   

BP's Pricing is also not dictated by PEMEX    per BP announcements:
"... The new BP stations will charge  “market prices”  for the fuel, company executives said, and given a gradual phase-out of government-set fuel prices ... "   (March 2013)


http://www.cspdailynews.com/fuels-news-prices-analysis/fuels-news/articles/bp-retail-enters-mexico

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-bp-mexico-gasoline/bp-plans-entry-into-mexicos-once-closed-retail-gasoline-market-idUSKBN16G37O

http://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/bp-opens-gas-station-in-satelite-naucalpan/

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On 9/4/2017 at 9:35 AM, Mainecoons said:

Interesting Informador article about a new chain of gas stations in the GDL area.  The article claims there is one somewhere in the Jocotepec area as well, in the 7th paragraph of the article.  Has anyone there seen this one?  Although the prices are still fixed the chain is guaranteeing no short pumping, a common problem.

Also some discussion of the possibility of gas shortages due to the problems in Texas.

http://www.informador.com.mx/economia/2017/737697/6/estrenan-identidad-estaciones-de-gasmex.htm

 

It is the station in El Chante. Different name, same service. It has been a Gasmex station for a while (a few months). It still looks like a Pemex. If you look for it, you will see the Gasmex sign. 

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5 hours ago, tomgates said:

Pemex fuel is without added ethanol. All the US companies that will have their own gas will have ethanol in it.

And if it does, you get lower performance and gas mileage with it.  It should be cheaper as it is a lower quality product when it comes to powering your car.

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... ah, but it is less polluting. Or at least that is the claim.

Also, not all gasoline NOB is with ethanol in the summer. I'm not sure what the criteria is, but in my travels I often see stations advertising "NO Ethanol". Sadly, it is always more expensive, but as MC notes, it gives better performance/mileage. 

P.S. Personally there are two things that I wish we could get rid of NOB.....  Ethanol in our gas and daylight savings time!

 

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