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Coloradoan

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Just arrived Lakeside a couple of months go and am waiting to move into our house. Just read the thread about the problems getting routers from Telmex so my question is will the Eero router I brought down with me work or will I need a Telmex router? It's been forever since I set up the WiFi in our NOB house and I'm anything but a techie. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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Unfortunately, you will need the Telmex modem/router. The modem is the necessary part, but the Telmex WI-FI routers are not the best. I hooked the Telmex unit to the telephone line (there is a small filter which must be installed too - supplied by Telmex), run an ethernet cable to a powerful, more up to date (security wise) WI-FI router, then turned the Telemex WI-FI off. If you get stuck, you can call Telmex customer support in Mexico City and ask for an English speaking technician.

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Yes, you can do all that, but it is not necessary to get started and I, in fact, don't bother. (For one thing, all WiFi security standards are available on all TelMex modems.) But perhaps more importantly, when you start a new Internet contract with TelMex, they give you a modem when you sign up. And the individual WiFi password is stamped on the modem.

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The owner of the house is going to transfer their service to us, but I'm not sure she's going to leave the router or if they even have a router. I suppose they could use an ethernet cable and not use WiFi (they are an older couple with a Shaw receiver and dish on the roof). Hmmm, could be interesting.

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If they have a Telmex modem, it is probably WIFi capable.  However, you may find that the masonry walls of Mexican homes do reduce the signal & you may need to use a cable anyway, depending on the relative locations of the modem and TV, etc.  Then, there is the question of speed; will it be sufficient to watch a streaming movie?  Maybe not. 

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2 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

Unfortunately, you will need the Telmex modem/router. The modem is the necessary part, but the Telmex WI-FI routers are not the best. I hooked the Telmex unit to the telephone line (there is a small filter which must be installed too - supplied by Telmex), run an ethernet cable to a powerful, more up to date (security wise) WI-FI router, then turned the Telemex WI-FI off. If you get stuck, you can call Telmex customer support in Mexico City and ask for an English speaking technician.

Telmex works FINE!!!

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5 hours ago, Coloradoan said:

The owner of the house is going to transfer their service to us, but I'm not sure she's going to leave the router or if they even have a router. I suppose they could use an ethernet cable and not use WiFi (they are an older couple with a Shaw receiver and dish on the roof). Hmmm, could be interesting.

You are not supposed to take your modem with you when you move, if you are leaving the phone number and service behind. When they sign up for a new contract (assuming they are not moving out of Mexico) they will get a new modem. However, TelMex is typically careless about tracking that kind of thing.

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11 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

You are not supposed to take your modem with you when you move, if you are leaving the phone number and service behind. When they sign up for a new contract (assuming they are not moving out of Mexico) they will get a new modem. However, TelMex is typically careless about tracking that kind of thing.

Good to know -- thanks for the info!

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16 hours ago, bontepar said:

Telmex works FINE!!!

Does it have dual USB ports? Does it have 1750 Mbps speed, over triple  2.4, 450 and 5ghz bands? Does it have the latest standards and security that can resist even a basic pentest? Does it offer guest networks? Does it have gigabit ports? Is it even strong enough to power WI-FI over your whole house? Let me know where you live so I can come over and steal free Telmex WI-FI and maybe poke around your computer a bit. My WI-FI router has all these features, I believe it cost $86 U.S., plus shipping etc.

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You could, but you have to know how to "flash" program your router. Only certain routers can do this, I don't think Telmex would appreciate you messing with theirs. Hardware VPN WI-FI routers have been out for a long time. Here is one of the biggest https://www.flashrouters.com You still need software and monthly support, unless you are happy with one of the free VPN providers. Then you still have to pay subscriptions for U.S. Netflix, Hulu, etc. If you watch a lot of TV and movies - I guess it is worth it.

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Since it's my business to know these things, let's look at some facts.

First, theoretical throughput speeds of 1750 Mbps are limited to the actual receivable speed of the device. Currently, there are no (for example, laptops) available with anything faster than "n", whose max receivable strength is 300 Mbps. Tablets and phones in the recent market are equipped with "ac", which is capable of receiving at, theoretically, 1331 Mbps.

Second, dual-band is not supported by TelMex: they don't have the infrastructure. Yes, you can use their dual-band (or someone else's) modem if you can still find one (I have one), but THE SPEED IS CAPPED AT 50% of what you would get with their standard modem. Thus, further degrading your 1750 Mbps... which is actually impossible right now because the standard for the fastest WiFi throughput is "ac" and it tops out at 1331 Mbps. Again, that is a theoretical speed, and the actual  speed is always going to be a lot less. If you can get 450 Mbps out of your WiFi router, you are doing good. (I won't explain dual band here, because this post is going to be long enough as it is...)

All current TelMex modems have USB ports, and they all have VOIP ports... but TelMex has decided not to bother implementing them. So if you need to hook up a Network Storage box, or a printer on your network, yes, having a USB port would be nice.

Next, there is no "450 band". Only 2.4 and 5. Are you sure that wasn't a throughput reference?

The current TelMex modem routers all have four Gigabit ethernet ports, not that the speed would even approach that. They do not have guest sharing, but I question the necessity for the vast majority of typical users.

Currently, there is no single WiFi router that can cover a whole house. In the past two or three years, the Huawei modems used by TelMex have increased both their range and their throughput speed by about 20%, based on actual tests I've done. And there are a number of solutions for extending the WiFi available to us.

And the rental of the modem is included with your monthly fee. If your third-party router breaks, you must replace it yourself, and of course it will not be supported by TelMex's technicians in any case.

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Computer Guy is focussing on internet access, while many people today, like those using Eero technologies, are looking to interconnect a household wide access through a wide variety of WI-FI devices, including blu-ray, media servers, games, and other equipment all requiring high speed connections much higher than simple internet access or streaming.

Then there is the very real security risks, especially with Telmex commanding the vast majority of modem WI-FI routers in Mexico.

https://www.cnet.com/news/top-wi-fi-routers-easy-to-hack-says-study/

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The original question is about Internet access with "which" modem. Your post, Chillin, includes all kinds of points that deal with that topic, and I discussed those points. If you want to focus on whole-house WiFi, you did not discuss that at all. If you want to focus on security, we can switch to that. But the question has been answered and the basic facts of a TelMex modem established, regardless of what other brands might be offering.

It bears repeating: one must use the TelMex modem to get the Internet here. Period. And while the addition of third-party routers for various other services can be a fine thing, 95% of my clients don't care. Finally, if we ARE going to discuss security, let's be reasonable and show both sides of the story. There is enough scare-mongering out there already about WiFi security and passwords. For example, your citation is full of puffery and fear, as evidenced by this one single quote from the actual article: ' "Since there are certain requirements to be met for these hacking methods to be successful, if you set up your router properly, and practice prudence while being online, chances are you're safe." Ngo said.'

Also, I'm not sure using technical terms on this thread (like pentest, which is short for penetration test in the security world) is relevant to most people on this board.

And honestly, I don't even know what Euro technologies means, unless you are referring to a specific company.

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Yes, upon rereading, I see... so I guessed correctly anyway, Euro Technologies. "Mesh" networking (a system of multiple installed WiFi points, considered a "mesh") is the coming thing, and when the price gets reasonable for down here, I will be doing it more often.

Still, he will need a TelMex router first.

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Coloradoan may have to contact Eero to see if they can recognise an out of country IP Address for their cloud and support services. A VPN enabled router might be necessary. Hooked up as per my post. Telmex modem turned on, Telmex WI-FI turned off.

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