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Speeding and drunk driving controls


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The specially trained officers on the front lines of the DUI road crews, definitely in CDMX, Puerto Vallarta, and I will assume here, are all WOMEN. There were many reasons (supposedly) behind this, they are less likely to personally know the drivers, less open to corruption, and since most of the offenders are male, they get more of a feeling that this is just a Mexican Mama bear protecting her cubs. This is more culturally acceptable. I think that is great, and has opened up a lot of jobs for women in the police system. Once you are in jail, that is probably a whole different matter.

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Betty, the cops treat everyone this way, not just expats.  The real issues here IMHO are firstly that this new standard is ridiculous overkill and secondly the police procedures used to enforce it are thuggish.  To everyone!

Having said that, the bottom line is that this is what we are stuck with and the most likely way not to be come a victim of either this draconian new standard OR the thuggish police is simply to recognize you can't have even one drink and drive.  

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I don't get it. In my home province, pretty much the same as everywhere, the police don't need a reason to pull you over. EVER. I've never been treated discourteously by a cop; in fact, usually the opposite. Yeah, sure, I'm a spoiled white boy, and the cops are different here. I can't comment on how anyone got treated.

I got stopped on a dark back road coming home from an AA meeting one night many years ago. I hadn't been weaving; I'd used my signal lights; my seat belt was on. They were bored. One cop asked me if I'd been drinking; at which point I burst out laughing.

My point is, checkpoints are for everyone's benefit. These were reténs, were they not? Well marked. I'm not going to defend the local cops' or judges decisions on alcohol limits, or lack of radar guns at speed traps, or shakedowns for every little thing. No way. But to suggest there is something wrong with being pulled over when there is no obvious offence, and to further suggest that it never happens "back home", is ridiculous. What are we going to do, wait until someone runs over a pedestrian before taking any action?

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This is ridiculous - where is this idea coming from that the cops are thugs, assaulting and beating innocent people? They have gone to the trouble and expense to especially train people to deal with possibly intoxicated or drugged people. Not to aggravate them, etc. This is to be commended - and it works, when Mexico City implemented this program in 2013, one year later alcohol/drug related accidents, including death, dropped by over 30%. Mexico should be training D.U.I/D.W.I crews NOB.

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Just now, pappysmarket said:

And I read texting while driving is twice as dangerous as many people at .08. Hey, it's their country so they get to make the rules.

Phone & texting get you pulled over immediately.  Our taxi driver from the GDL airport was pulled over & said the fine was extreme. 

 

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My favorite part of the "victim's" publically posted tirade (keep in mind, the "victim," who I do know, failed her breathalyzer test, so it would appear she has no right to complain) was when she complained that it was difficult to sleep on a hard floor under bright lights while the "staff" talked "loudly all through the night" and someone in the cell was snoring. Yes, welcome to Mexico. You go to jail and you probably aren't going to be even fed. It's even more horrible, perhaps, than how prisoners in private prisons in the United States are forced to work as slaves. Just don't hop onto social media the moment you get out of jail and complain about social media about how you were treated. You just reveal your white privilege. This person wasn't even in jail for 12 hours and says she persuaded the "staff" to let her go at 6 a.m. for medical reasons. She would never get away with that in the US, and yet she complains of being mistreated. Sounds by her own telling of the event that she was treated just like everyone else gets treated.

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1 minute ago, betty7 said:

texting & cell phones should be illegal. huge fines & later suspending the license. chillin- the treatment before & during jail is brutality. if you like it be my guest. you are a apologist for mexico. maybe a few hours in jail is enough for a bit of toxity & no infractions. i believe the expat victim.

I believe the expat victim, too. She drank, she failed the breathalyzer, she went to jail. All by her own admittance. Sounds more like you're being an apologist for drunk drivers.

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13 minutes ago, windstar said:

Phone & texting get you pulled over immediately.  Our taxi driver from the GDL airport was pulled over & said the fine was extreme.

I hope they roughed him up a little bit too - just to show who is in charge. Or like the bad cops, a long time ago in the U.K., would rough you up pretty good, and when you said "What was that for, I did nuffing wrong!" Their reply was "Just imagine what you are going to get if you actually DID something wrong Sunny Jim!".

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3 minutes ago, betty7 said:

fickle now i get why so many self hating americanos ae attacted to 3rd world hell holes or facist dictatorships. democracy is a racial thing in our eyes. no its not.  i knew we would get to this, dont answer because i wont engage. the victim could have stress fractures or gotton injured. she was not drunk on one drink. looks like this lady will not ever drink & drive again.

11

Yes, she was drunk, she failed the breathalyzer. It's great she'll never drink and drive and break the law again. You don't get to set the law, the government does. You seem to be someone who cannot accept "facts." So goodbye, you are of no use to this conversation.

Also, you assume I am American. LOLZ.

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"Oh, and did I say that this huge sting exercise was literally across the street from where I lived? But they wouldn't let me leave my car and just walk across the street.  And, at first they told me that I was going to be in jail for 36 hours and I was frantic for my dog."

She expects the cops to let her run home after being detained. Totally privileged person.

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I don't think it is a bad thing to have DUI checkpoints. I'm not a big drinker, but I do feel it is imperative to take it all seriously. Walk to a nearby restaurant if you can, or take a cab would be solutions I would use. I am seriously concerned about being on the carretera and encountering an impaired driver. The roads are like a three ring circus without adding alcohol. It seems very much on overkill that  ya can't have just 1, but since that's the way it is now, I clearly won't be having that occasional "one". 

In the last month I had my car impounded twice. One was sketchy and controversial, the other clearly my fault due to parking in a restricted zone in pouring rain in the dark. Point is, when you are dealing with authorities, they own you. This is what I experienced. It is no joke. I played the game well enough thanks to my functional Spanish. I pity those who don't have the language. When you have the language you get more respect, IMO. So my comment for the lady who talked her way out of jail with her language skills is "good job, mujer!" I would have done the same. I have worked in prisons in my career as a counselor. One thing I must say is that while no hotel, in the USA you do have sanitation, toilet paper, and food and water. Absense of this is a health disaster waiting to happen and IMO is barbaric and inhumane. Regardless of the crime. And here, you really have no rights. You are at their mercy. So because I like it here, I play a tighter game and lay much lower overall.

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5 hours ago, windstar said:

Phone & texting get you pulled over immediately.  Our taxi driver from the GDL airport was pulled over & said the fine was extreme.

Last time I read the law for Jalisco, the fine was 1 to 5 days minimum pay. That tops out at $340 pesos maybe. That's miniscule. And around here it won't get you pulled over immediately: 90% of the time they don't notice and don't care.

AND there's always a 35 to 50% discount when paying early. So the guy's maximum fine woulda been $170p. Ouch!

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This is getting silly. What's the prob here? The law is the law. If they actually used a breathalyzer, then that suggests there is some limit that was crossed, right?

Meantime, I'd like to know how this jailed woman got to call her friend, right after specifically stating they wouldn't let her make a call.

EDIT: 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100 milliliters is .08, the exact same limit as in the province of Ontario. Again I say, what makes Mexico unusual?

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18 minutes ago, ComputerGuy said:

This is getting silly. What's the prob here? The law is the law. If they actually used a breathalyzer, then that suggests there is some limit that was crossed, right?

Meantime, I'd like to know how this jailed woman got to call her friend, right after specifically stating they wouldn't let her make a call.

The problem seems to be that some people have decided the police were just jailing people they felt like jailing based on nothing at all. They believe this because "somebody said...." Nevermind that other people said they were stopped and had had a drink so got the breathilizer and then were let go because they had only one drink. Given a choice of which story to believe some people went with the one that confirmed what they already believe about Mexico and Mexicans. Confirmation bias is real. So, we have the "nobody can ever have even one drink and go anywhere ever again" martyrdom of the downtrodden foreigners. Again according to the OP on this horror show the victim did get to make a phone but that may have been lost in the original tirade and subsequent reinterpretations.

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Anyone with no actual experience in this can say anything they want. Doesn't mean I believe or disbelieve it. Now, the term "barbaric"... where exactly did this come from? We've taken what might have been rude treatment and made it A FEDERAL FRIKKIN' OFFENSE. I wasn't there; I didn't see it... and neither did anybody here. I don't usually call for moderation on this board, but I believe it is time.

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I agree, CG. This has gotten hysterical and out of hand. No one knows or cares if what they are saying is true or not. They just repeat the last thing they heard or the thing that rubs their bias the right way. It is now officially ridiculous. 

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One drink could mean anything from a light beer to a strong arse margarita.  She spent a couple of hours in a very aweful and grungy jail cell with poor hygiene, that sucks, but really it could of been much worse if she was in the states.  I didn't read where they took her mug shot, and she had to go to court and hire a lawyer.  She also didn't mention how her insurance shot up sky high.  In the US, a DUI will cost you thousands of dollars when it is all said and done.  Sure Mexican jails are horrible places, but I'd rather spend one or two nights there than face the nightmare of entering into the system of the USA.  But if it is for something serious please extradite me to the USA as soon as possible!

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  • Jaime Niembro gathered this info in response to the flurry of conversation occasioned by Jill Fryer’s experience with this program she wrote about on Facebook. 
     
    TAG
    Please share with your friends this information that I pull together.
    Saludos.
     
    Jaime Niembro.
     
    Understand The “Saving Lives Program” being implemented by the motor vehicle’s in the state of Jalisco.
     
    This is what going on.
     
    Reviews will be permanent on weekends.
    The revision modules in the Zona Metropolitana de Guadalajara will continue on a regular basis.
    In coordination with the Federal Police, the Single State Force and the Municipal Police, the Salvando Vidas program, operated by personnel of the General Police Station Police Station, will install, from now on, and permanently, modules of revision in the main accesses Carreteras of the Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara.
     
    These revision modules that will be installed randomly in the different state road junctions (road to Chapala, Tequila, Jocotepec, Saltillo, etc.) will have cranes and wagons for the transfer of drivers that exceed the permitted levels of alcohol to the Installations of the Urban Center for Road Retention by Alcoholimetry (CURVE), as well as the delivery of the vehicles to the corresponding depots.
     
    The purpose of the operation, which will be permanent and will be installed on weekends, is to inhibit the combination of alcohol and steering wheel between those driving a motor vehicle, as well as speeding through the installation of mobile radars in order to influence the reduction Of the risk factors that cause road accidents.
     
    The General Police Department of the Road Police confirmed that in the Guadalajara Metropolitan Area will continue its operations in a normal way as it does to date.
     
    Inspection procedure:
    In the safety filter of the "Saving Lives" operation, the Police of the Road Police will randomly select the vehicle, to whose driver the alcohol test will be applied.
     
    The driver is informed about the program and is given a breath test with exhaled air equipment, in two stages: the first one is the qualitative one (detects if alcohol is present without measuring the level); The result is displayed on the device screen.
     
    In case of detecting the presence of intoxicants, the motorist will be asked: license, circulation card insurance policy; You will get out of your car and the expert will perform the quantitative test to measure your alcohol level.
     
    For each test, a new, individually packaged, sealed and sterilized nozzle shall be used and shall be displayed and placed on the measuring equipment in the presence of the driver.
     
    The driver will exhale in the plastic nozzle, sufficiently and steadily, to allow the equipment to obtain a sufficient sample, and thus obtain the result of the test.
     
    Depending on the outcome of the quantitative stage, that is, the level of alcohol, proceed according to what is established in Article 186 of the Law of Mobility, to punish with an economic fine of about 10 thousand and up to 13 thousand pesos or arrest Administrative, from 12 to 36 hours.
     
    The Qualifying Judge will determine the corresponding sanction and will have access to the information to determine the recidivism.
     
    If the result of the test results in the application of the fine, the driver will be drawn up a Certificate of Notification of Infringements, it will be delivered with his documents and auto; May withdraw.
     
    If the result of the test results in the application of the administrative arrest, the motorist will be notified of the sanction, sign or stamp his / her fingerprints; From that moment began to count the computation of the sanction imposed.
      
    The Road Police will prepare the Certificate of Notification of Infringements, securing the vehicle and sending it with crane, with charge to the driver, to the authorized warehouse.
     
    The offending driver will be transferred to the Alcoholimetry Retention Urban Center, in the Road Police or Municipal Transit Unit as appropriate.
     
    In the place of the retention, the Road Police responsible for the transfer, will give the driver the Certificate of Notification of Infringement and its documentation; And a copy to the staff of CURVA, the document issued by the Qualifying Judge, which stipulates the penalty to be covered by the violating driver, receiving an acknowledgment of receipt.
     
    Sanctionable alcohol levels
     
    Fine of 150 to 200 minimum wages, that is, from nine thousand 714 pesos to 12 thousand 952 pesos. This economic penalty applies when the driver is detected 0.25 to 0.40 milligrams of alcohol per liter of exhaled air.
     
    Uncontrollable administrative arrest from 12 to 24 hours to the driver being detected from 0.41 to 0.65 milligrams of alcohol per liter of exhaled air.
     
    Uncontrollable administrative arrest of 24 to 36 hours for the motorist to be detected more than 0.65 milligrams of alcohol per liter of exhaled air.
     
    cid:image001.jpg@01D311CE.B82A9550
     

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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