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carphil
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My first trip to McD's was in 1964 I think and a hamburger was 15 cents and fries 12 cents. No tables, please throw your trash in the parking lot, not out on the highway. Some people said that was littering but most of the employees saw it as job security.

Times change.

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Back in the 70's/80's a friend of mine had a summer job at Taco Bell.  He said when they would cook up the ground beef it would be quite greasy.  Lots of fat and water.  They had bags of filler that were poured into the beef to soak up the liquid before they took it to the serving area.  The employees called it KITTY LITTER!!!!!:D:o:wacko:

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40 minutes ago, El Menudo said:

Back in the 70's/80's a friend of mine had a summer job at Taco Bell.  He said when they would cook up the ground beef it would be quite greasy.  Lots of fat and water.  They had bags of filler that were poured into the beef to soak up the liquid before they took it to the serving area.  The employees called it KITTY LITTER!!!!!:D:o:wacko:

Yes, kitty litter is a great filler for ground beef. Many places use it.

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Maybe better to spend more than a week living here (a year might be a good start) before offering opinions about Mexican food that show you might be better off without a passport. 

México is one of the great street food cultures in the world and street food is invariably "fast" food - though not in the U.S. sense where the term means "corporate chemically-enhanced poison." Learning the ropes starts with appreciating local meal times and customs, which are very different from those N.O.B.

In our area, breakfast time (starting around 8, but peaking at around 10 a.m.) is tacos de canasta and tacos de barbacoa time (for those who need fast food vs. sitting down to huevos alla Mexciana, huevos divorciado, chilaquiles or any one of the other fantastic dishes that make Mexican breakfasts some of the best on the planet. Don Vic in Ajijic has incredible tacos de barbacoa (as would be expected from a business where that has been their sole offering, since 1973!) but there are great ones to be had at many other places (see link to my local food blog below for a few options). 

One can get other types of tacos throughout the day here and there but since comida (the one meal of the day one does not miss in this culture, at 2-3 p.m.) is the daytime focus and people work long, long hours in this culture tacos are in general a nighttime thing. Taquerias here and everywhere else in México (including innumerable stands that pop up outside of people's homes) often don't open until 7 p.m. or later and stay open well past midnight. 

Real tacos (as opposed to the ersatz Tex Mex of Taco Bell) are made with fresh corn tortillas and any number of guisados and meats, from barbacoa to lengua, bistek to al pastor, chorizo con papas to nopalitos. At 6-9 pesos apiece, loaded up with fresh veggies and salsa from the condiment bar, they are fabulous and you can have a full meal (~3 tacos) for less than the cost of one awful Taco Grande. 

As for burgers, they're obviously not traditional food but there are numerous excellent examples at Lakeside. Gossip's makes theirs out of freshly-ground sirloin and serves them with excellent fries for about 90 pesos. Toca de Madera in Chapala does an equally good job, Bruno's has odd business hours at the moment but is a perennial candidate for best burger honors here (along with very good steaks), and Café Adelita in San Antonio offers a very substantial (my wife and I split it and order a salad) burger in perhaps the most pleasant atmosphere Lakeside has to offer. The cost of a grilled-to-order burger with all of the trimmings at any of these places is $5-6 U.S. including sides - less than 5 guys or an equivalent-sized burger from Wendy's in the U.S. 

Despite the disastrous effects of U.S. multinationals like Coca Cola and Frito Lay this country is never going to be a place where the predominant food offerings are so corporate and standardized that you can't tell what state, let alone city, you are in. Those who prefer that kind of bland consistency in their culture and cuisine should just stay home and maybe visit an all-inclusive resort here for a taste of the kind of México they are ready for. 

http://eatinglocalatlakeside.blogspot.mx

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It ain't necessarily so.... TB's are owned by Pepsico and are franchised, which means a Whopping cash investment on the part of the franchisee. This might account for the lack of many US style fast food joints. I would be thrilled if someone could open a taco stand that's open after 6pm-yes I know the risks but why not turn that monster car wash on the carretera just before Waffle House into a drive through, protecting employees (as much as is possible) to allow sales of say, milkshakes, burgers, tacos? There's space inside for walk ins too. Great location, sadly unused except for the odd days (no pattern here)  they open to clean cars.

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8 minutes ago, IMBurnen said:

It ain't necessarily so.... TB's are owned by Pepsico and are franchised, which means a Whopping cash investment on the part of the franchisee. This might account for the lack of many US style fast food joints. I would be thrilled if someone could open a taco stand that's open after 6pm-yes I know the risks but why not turn that monster car wash on the carretera just before Waffle House into a drive through, protecting employees (as much as is possible) to allow sales of say, milkshakes, burgers, tacos? There's space inside for walk ins too. Great location, sadly unused except for the odd days (no pattern here)  they open to clean cars.

I am assuming this is a lack particular to your neighborhood, IM. There are taco stands open in the evening all over lakeside.

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Finding a late night taco stand might be easier in the various neighborhoods, instead of along the highway.  Cenadurias, after 7PM and until about 11PM, are also good places to stop for anything from a snack to a large meal.  Our favorite was Cenaduria Elba, in Chapala centro.  If you are only out in the daytime, you will probably never even notice the location of a cenaduria, as they are only open in the evenings & may not even have a sign that would be visible in the daytime.  Try them for fast, traditional & delicious Mexican food.  Most are family affairs and have been open for generations.  Yum!

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3 hours ago, Kevin K said:

Maybe better to spend more than a week living here (a year might be a good start) before offering opinions about Mexican food that show you might be better off without a passport. 

México is one of the great street food cultures in the world and street food is invariably "fast" food - though not in the U.S. sense where the term means "corporate chemically-enhanced poison." Learning the ropes starts with appreciating local meal times and customs, which are very different from those N.O.B.

In our area, breakfast time (starting around 8, but peaking at around 10 a.m.) is tacos de canasta and tacos de barbacoa time (for those who need fast food vs. sitting down to huevos alla Mexciana, huevos divorciado, chilaquiles or any one of the other fantastic dishes that make Mexican breakfasts some of the best on the planet. Don Vic in Ajijic has incredible tacos de barbacoa (as would be expected from a business where that has been their sole offering, since 1973!) but there are great ones to be had at many other places (see link to my local food blog below for a few options). 

One can get other types of tacos throughout the day here and there but since comida (the one meal of the day one does not miss in this culture, at 2-3 p.m.) is the daytime focus and people work long, long hours in this culture tacos are in general a nighttime thing. Taquerias here and everywhere else in México (including innumerable stands that pop up outside of people's homes) often don't open until 7 p.m. or later and stay open well past midnight. 

Real tacos (as opposed to the ersatz Tex Mex of Taco Bell) are made with fresh corn tortillas and any number of guisados and meats, from barbacoa to lengua, bistek to al pastor, chorizo con papas to nopalitos. At 6-9 pesos apiece, loaded up with fresh veggies and salsa from the condiment bar, they are fabulous and you can have a full meal (~3 tacos) for less than the cost of one awful Taco Grande. 

As for burgers, they're obviously not traditional food but there are numerous excellent examples at Lakeside. Gossip's makes theirs out of freshly-ground sirloin and serves them with excellent fries for about 90 pesos. Toca de Madera in Chapala does an equally good job, Bruno's has odd business hours at the moment but is a perennial candidate for best burger honors here (along with very good steaks), and Café Adelita in San Antonio offers a very substantial (my wife and I split it and order a salad) burger in perhaps the most pleasant atmosphere Lakeside has to offer. The cost of a grilled-to-order burger with all of the trimmings at any of these places is $5-6 U.S. including sides - less than 5 guys or an equivalent-sized burger from Wendy's in the U.S. 

Despite the disastrous effects of U.S. multinationals like Coca Cola and Frito Lay this country is never going to be a place where the predominant food offerings are so corporate and standardized that you can't tell what state, let alone city, you are in. Those who prefer that kind of bland consistency in their culture and cuisine should just stay home and maybe visit an all-inclusive resort here for a taste of the kind of México they are ready for. 

http://eatinglocalatlakeside.blogspot.mx

Excellent description of what's available here. No need to put down those who don't share your tastes. Very childish.

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3 hours ago, Kevin K said:

Maybe better to spend more than a week living here (a year might be a good start) before offering opinions about Mexican food that show you might be better off without a passport. 

México is one of the great street food cultures in the world and street food is invariably "fast" food - though not in the U.S. sense where the term means "corporate chemically-enhanced poison." Learning the ropes starts with appreciating local meal times and customs, which are very different from those N.O.B.

In our area, breakfast time (starting around 8, but peaking at around 10 a.m.) is tacos de canasta and tacos de barbacoa time (for those who need fast food vs. sitting down to huevos alla Mexciana, huevos divorciado, chilaquiles or any one of the other fantastic dishes that make Mexican breakfasts some of the best on the planet. Don Vic in Ajijic has incredible tacos de barbacoa (as would be expected from a business where that has been their sole offering, since 1973!) but there are great ones to be had at many other places (see link to my local food blog below for a few options). 

One can get other types of tacos throughout the day here and there but since comida (the one meal of the day one does not miss in this culture, at 2-3 p.m.) is the daytime focus and people work long, long hours in this culture tacos are in general a nighttime thing. Taquerias here and everywhere else in México (including innumerable stands that pop up outside of people's homes) often don't open until 7 p.m. or later and stay open well past midnight. 

Real tacos (as opposed to the ersatz Tex Mex of Taco Bell) are made with fresh corn tortillas and any number of guisados and meats, from barbacoa to lengua, bistek to al pastor, chorizo con papas to nopalitos. At 6-9 pesos apiece, loaded up with fresh veggies and salsa from the condiment bar, they are fabulous and you can have a full meal (~3 tacos) for less than the cost of one awful Taco Grande. 

As for burgers, they're obviously not traditional food but there are numerous excellent examples at Lakeside. Gossip's makes theirs out of freshly-ground sirloin and serves them with excellent fries for about 90 pesos. Toca de Madera in Chapala does an equally good job, Bruno's has odd business hours at the moment but is a perennial candidate for best burger honors here (along with very good steaks), and Café Adelita in San Antonio offers a very substantial (my wife and I split it and order a salad) burger in perhaps the most pleasant atmosphere Lakeside has to offer. The cost of a grilled-to-order burger with all of the trimmings at any of these places is $5-6 U.S. including sides - less than 5 guys or an equivalent-sized burger from Wendy's in the U.S. 

Despite the disastrous effects of U.S. multinationals like Coca Cola and Frito Lay this country is never going to be a place where the predominant food offerings are so corporate and standardized that you can't tell what state, let alone city, you are in. Those who prefer that kind of bland consistency in their culture and cuisine should just stay home and maybe visit an all-inclusive resort here for a taste of the kind of México they are ready for. 

http://eatinglocalatlakeside.blogspot.mx

I can usually tell where I am at because, uh, I went there.  Don't get your panties all in a twist.  Your comparing street tacos to texmex tacos.  Not the same thing at all.  

Once I was ask while in Mexico what I missed most about the USA and I said, whataburger, texmex and yellow cheese.  Have you ever had Frito Pie or Rotel dip?  Ya can't beat it baby!

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12 minutes ago, El Menudo said:

I can usually tell where I am at because, uh, I went there.  Don't get your panties all in a twist.  Your comparing street tacos to texmex tacos.  Not the same thing at all.  

Once I was ask while in Mexico what I missed most about the USA and I said, whataburger, texmex and yellow cheese.  Have you ever had Frito Pie or Rotel dip?  Ya can't beat it baby!

How about "Chile con Queso" from that horrible Houston chain, Casa Ole? Google has the recipe and Costco has the American cheese. I need to make that tomorrow, thanks.

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6 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Pappy has Carl's Jr in PV, Outback, KFC, Sirloin Stockade, McDees, I think Burger King - not sure.

Yes, they are all here. I have been once to Outback, once was enough. If flying I will often stop at Carl's in the airport. The others I have not tried. For us, Soriana makes the best fried chicken. Best burger other than my own is at Taste of Italy. Looks to be almost half a pound with all the fixins plus coleslaw. We split it and usually leave some. During lunch it comes with a beer or margarita for $79, no drink included at supper.

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4 hours ago, IMBurnen said:

It ain't necessarily so.... TB's are owned by Pepsico and are franchised, which means a Whopping cash investment on the part of the franchisee. This might account for the lack of many US style fast food joints. I would be thrilled if someone could open a taco stand that's open after 6pm-yes I know the risks but why not turn that monster car wash on the carretera just before Waffle House into a drive through, protecting employees (as much as is possible) to allow sales of say, milkshakes, burgers, tacos? There's space inside for walk ins too. Great location, sadly unused except for the odd days (no pattern here)  they open to clean cars.

Jessica's in Ajijic is a classic taqueria only at night and right on the carretera. The other places (and they are countless) are, as Xena said, located in the various villages. Chapala has several along Madero, San Antonio has the wonderful El Comal Express just off the southwest corner of the square and there are stands and taco carts that spring up after dark all over the place. 

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2 hours ago, El Saltos said:

Taco Bell is owned by YUM Brands, not Pepsico.

And Pepsico spun off YUM 20 years ago. And who cares...

"Yum! was created on May 30, 1997, as Tricon Global Restaurants, Inc. from PepsiCo's fast food division as the parent corporation of KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell restaurant companies.[4][5]"

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On 7/23/2017 at 1:31 PM, pappysmarket said:

Yes, they are all here. I have been once to Outback, once was enough. If flying I will often stop at Carl's in the airport. The others I have not tried. For us, Soriana makes the best fried chicken. Best burger other than my own is at Taste of Italy. Looks to be almost half a pound with all the fixins plus coleslaw. We split it and usually leave some. During lunch it comes with a beer or margarita for $79, no drink included at supper.

Where is Taste if Italy?

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12 minutes ago, gringohombre said:

Where is Taste if Italy?

Taste of Italy is in Old Town right across (ocean side) from the park with underground parking. The very north beginning of Olas Altas, next to Daiquiri Dick's and behind the Blue Shrimp. It sounds like he will be closing for August, you know how these folks are, right? Roger and his wife Gloria bought it a couple of years ago from the original owners, Rosie and Richie. Roger had been a waiter there for years. Rosie and Richie are from the Bronx and had (maybe still have) an Italian restaurant there and brought their recipes here. Very good and very reasonably priced sandwiches, pastas and small thin crust pizzas. They may not win any culinary awards but their food is very good and few if any complaints have I ever heard. Everyday, all day, margs $17, Corona and Corona Light $17 and Pacifico $20. Nice people and a great location.

Edit: You do know we're talking PV, right?

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On 7/20/2017 at 10:24 PM, zerbit said:

I think the only Taco Bell in Mexico is in the CD MX. Population 22 million. I think you have a long wait lakeside for the area to warrant a franchise. 

There is no Taco Bell in Mexico City.  

In the early 1990s, one opened here and closed pretty quickly.  In about 2008, a Taco Bell opened in Monterrey but closed fast due to lack of business.

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After two failed attempts to launch Taco Bell in Mexico, at different times and in different cities and all of them closed due to lack of sales, the message seems loud and clear that Mexicans do not like Taco Bell. My Mexican friends who have been in the States all tried it once. That was enough for them.

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And yet that puts the lie to all the previous posts about Mexicans in the U.S. loving Taco Bell.

I know this: Taco Bells in my home town in Canada were very popular, but now that real Mexican food restaurants are opening more often, there is a huge swing towards them. Unfortunately, for those who have been to Mexico and love the food here, they find the prices excruciatingly high at these restaurants. Don't ask me how I ended up at a Burrito Boracho place on my recent trip, but the burrito was 15 bucks. Ouch. And it didn't even compare to what is available around here. Everyone seems to think that Chipotle is the only way to make a burrito. Wrong.

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