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Nationalized/legalized vehicles


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Yes, Nationalizing is going on at the border. As a part of that process the vehicle must first be Exported from the US by Customs Border Protection, a function that is generally done these days by the broker and can take a couple of days.  I think the cost to Nationalize is mostly the 16% IVA against the KBB value of the vehicle. Then there will be the cost to get State title and plates which is generally not a part of the Nationalization.  Sorry, but I don't know what years of NAFTA vehicles can be nationalized 'today' but it used to be 'more than 5 years old and less than 10. NAFTA did have a clause that said in 2017 vehicles 2 years or older could be imported and by 2019 there would be no age limit.... but that may have changed.

 

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5 hours ago, RickS said:

Yes, Nationalizing is going on at the border. As a part of that process the vehicle must first be Exported from the US by Customs Border Protection, a function that is generally done these days by the broker and can take a couple of days.  I think the cost to Nationalize is mostly the 16% IVA against the KBB value of the vehicle. Then there will be the cost to get State title and plates which is generally not a part of the Nationalization.  Sorry, but I don't know what years of NAFTA vehicles can be nationalized 'today' but it used to be 'more than 5 years old and less than 10. NAFTA did have a clause that said in 2017 vehicles 2 years or older could be imported and by 2019 there would be no age limit.... but that may have changed.

 

"General Import Tax

An apreciate  tariff of 10% of general import tax must be paid. This will be applied to the customs value of the vehicle

Value added tax.

They are obliged to pay the value added tax established in the Value Added Tax Law, physical and moral persons who, in national territory, import goods or services.

The tax will be calculated by applying to the values that the Law mentioned, the rate of 16%. In no case shall the value added tax be deemed to be part of such values."

http://www.sat.gob.mx/aduanas/vehiculos/importaciones_autosusados/Paginas/contribuciones.aspx

 

16% IVA tax on the 10% tarrif tax of the value in the KBB.

A KBB value of $10,000 USD will be 10% = $1,000 USD then IVA of 16% = $160.00 USD = $1,160 USD tax + a $50.00 USD Aduana fee = $1,210 USD fee plus import broker fees and expenses, possibly a US state smog certificate ,CBP export costs, 3 days with CBP in the USA etc..

 

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We have a Canadian Pontiac 2006 G6 , have been quoted from border brokers  $ 4890.00 to nationalize, have also been quoted by others at  $ 136.000 Pesos , so where does 16 percent IVA plus expenses   come in when kelly blue says value  $1600.00 . I would gladly hear from some one how to get this done at a reasonable cost. I have been struggling with this for some time trying to get some straight answers.

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11 hours ago, peterth said:

We have a Canadian Pontiac 2006 G6 , have been quoted from border brokers  $ 4890.00 to nationalize, have also been quoted by others at  $ 136.000 Pesos , so where does 16 percent IVA plus expenses   come in when kelly blue says value  $1600.00 . I would gladly hear from some one how to get this done at a reasonable cost. I have been struggling with this for some time trying to get some straight answers.

Unless you are just 'married' to the G6, one might consider dumping it and purchasing the nice looking Nissan Altima in the Classified section of this forum for..... 90,000 pesos. Luxury, leather and only 120,000 kilometers.

And, no, it's not mine!

 

 

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Importation of an older car is seldom worth the time, money and effort. You will never get the value back, probably never be able to get full insurance coverage, and maybe even become the target of thieves looking for rare, old parts.  Best to sell it in its home country, and replace it with a proper Mexican vehicle.  Life will be much simpler and the traffic police will not target you for imagined infractions and mordida.

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All is well,but why is the cost so high on something you say is of no value. No I am not married to the car but I know the history and the service and low mileage and yes it has leather seats and all the rest of the goodies and I like it I don't need a new car with whole lot of new gadgets I would never use. Basic transportation is all that is needed. A few years ago we exported a motor home from the U. S. to Canada , no cost to export but in Canada at the border we paid the tax, done no brokers involved. As some one mentioned to use our local people in Ajijic, well we tried that and that is where they said Aduana wanted 136.000 peses plus 850.00 U.S. to import the vehicle to the U.S. then export to Mexico [ duh ] another money grab by who knows who on a vehicle  that supposedly has little value. So where does the 16 per cent IVA come to this value. So would it work if I was to come to the Mexican border and declare I am importing my car,

I realize and appreciate this is Mexico but some things really do not make sense

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On ‎30‎/‎06‎/‎2017 at 10:34 PM, peterth said:

We have a Canadian Pontiac 2006 G6 , have been quoted from border brokers  $ 4890.00 to nationalize, have also been quoted by others at  $ 136.000 Pesos , so where does 16 percent IVA plus expenses   come in when kelly blue says value  $1600.00 . I would gladly hear from some one how to get this done at a reasonable cost. I have been struggling with this for some time trying to get some straight answers.

Only vehicles with the proper VIN that are 8 or 9 years old can be imported into the interior of Mexico at the above rates I posted. Your vehicle is 11 years old and doesn´t qualify so there is a way around it obviously but it costs much more than if it did quailify by being a 2008 or 2009 and 2009 or 2010 vehicle soon in Nov, 2017.

"Used vehicles whose model year is eight and nine years prior to the year in which the importation takes place."

http://www.sat.gob.mx/aduanas/vehiculos/importaciones_autosusados/Paginas/vehiculos_usados.aspx

There is no way to import it economically.

 

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5 hours ago, peterth said:

All is well,but why is the cost so high on something you say is of no value. No I am not married to the car but I know the history and the service and low mileage and yes it has leather seats and all the rest of the goodies and I like it I don't need a new car with whole lot of new gadgets I would never use. Basic transportation is all that is needed. A few years ago we exported a motor home from the U. S. to Canada , no cost to export but in Canada at the border we paid the tax, done no brokers involved. As some one mentioned to use our local people in Ajijic, well we tried that and that is where they said Aduana wanted 136.000 peses plus 850.00 U.S. to import the vehicle to the U.S. then export to Mexico [ duh ] another money grab by who knows who on a vehicle  that supposedly has little value. So where does the 16 per cent IVA come to this value. So would it work if I was to come to the Mexican border and declare I am importing my car,

I realize and appreciate this is Mexico but some things really do not make sense

Do you have any idea how many hundreds, if not thousands, of us have said the exact same thing as this over the past several years. You are not breaking new ground here. You ask for logic when there seems to be none. There is no one that will advise you to nationalize your present vehicle. The only sound advice you have already been given and continue to question. Do as you wish, but the advice to you will not change.

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Wise decision.  Mexico is a major automobile manufacturing country and you will find a large selection of vehicles to choose from.  Besides, you will be much happier driving a car with local plates and a ready supply of parts & service, if you need them.

Mexico has the intention to get rid of most older vehicles, in favor of the newer fuel-efficient vehicle. They are succeeding with these rules, as well as fairly recent anti-pollution testing in most states.

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It's just a car. Just drive it until someone really wants to take it away (ie not a crooked cop looking for cash). Take the keys, your paperwork and plates. Go buy another one - it is that simple. Make sure you have liability insurance, valid driver's license, and try to keep up the smog sticker. Keep a good taxi on speed dial. Stay away from Federale areas like the airport. Just keep the car for local jaunts and shopping, the buses are a much better way to travel anyways.

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If you are going to take Chillin's advice, make sure you read your insurance policy and see if it has the clause  "only valid for vehicles legally in Mexico"..... 

If it has that clause and you are involved in an accident (doesn't even have to be your fault), plan on spending quite a bit of time in a Mexican jail. :010:

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Another hot topic :-) Much of the above is incorrect. For nationalizing at the border contact the experts and pls give feed back when you have answers. I am being told by people who have nationalized recently, cost is between $1900 and $2800. I know of a 1998 F-150 being nationalized a few months ago and a 2009 in past month. 

The brokers are Enrique & Jose Bautistia.  Enrique has a Laredo office and speaks perfect English.  He will lead you across the border to the Nuevo office which is 2 blocks from Aduana. Drivers take your car to Aduana while you wait in an air conditioned office.

Enrique Bautista email:  superimportaciones@yahoo.com

Also, enrique_bautista@yahoo.com

The website is:  www.superimportaciones.com.  Enrique's phone is 956-722-6476.  Cell - 956-645-8073.

Jose Bautista email:  jgbm60@hotmail.com 

He is located in Nuevo Laredo 2 blocks from Aduana. 

Enrique is at 2500 Pinder Ave., Laredo, TX 78040.

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16 hours ago, RickS said:

If you are going to take Chillin's advice, make sure you read your insurance policy and see if it has the clause  "only valid for vehicles legally in Mexico"..... 

If it has that clause and you are involved in an accident (doesn't even have to be your fault), plan on spending quite a bit of time in a Mexican jail. :010:

I don't how many times I have to repeat this, Lewis and Lewis in California, and many others sell liability insurance for foreign plated vehicles in Mexico. Their only requirement is that the vehicle must be registered in Canada or the U.S.A. - current plates do not matter.

Why is it that everytime you disagree with someone you have to paint dire scenarios? What a way to live a life. Why would anyone be tricked into buying into that clause? Again, the best is private indemnity or "driver's license" insurance - I can drive any vehicle in Mexico, still have medical, passenger medical, liability (3,000,000 pesos), lawyerup, and roadside - but no collision or theft (those are vehicle insurance policies). Used to be with GNP, now with Qualitas.

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Please explain how one obtains legal, current registration in the USA or Canada without being issued current licence plate renewal.  I am unaware of such an option, having registered vehicles in NY, MA, PA, NC, SC, FL, TX, and SD; as well as in IZM, Turkey and JAL, Mexico; and have always been issued license plates or renewal stickers, which are required to be displayed for the vehicle to be legally driven upon the public roadways; the very requirement for legal circulation in Mexican states.

I seriously doubt that Lewis & Lewis (simply an agent), or any insurance underwriter, intends that an expired registration is acceptable; nor would I suggest that anyone make that assumption.

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25 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

Please explain how one obtains legal, current registration in the USA or Canada without being issued current licence plate renewal.

I don't know about the U.S. This is the situation in British Columbia. You have your registration, then you have your plates, which must show an up to date insurance sticker (while driving in Canada). Many people have vehicles in storage, investments, seasonal use, that are not street driven - are you implying they all have to have current plates? That is silly, does not make sense. Read Lewis and Lewis, who is indeed an agent for Qualitas in Mexico.

Oh, and by the way, you are wrong about Jalisco - the original factura is your registration, whether the car is driven or not.

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Chillin, to me the subject is giving reasonable recommendations to someone who is wanting to know if they can nationalize a certain vehicle to drive in Mexico, not how I spend my life (which BTW it's going just perfectly, thank you for being concerned!).  You have suggested that the inquirer just "drive it until someone takes it away from you" and "get only Liability insurance" and not being "tricked into believing a clause that is in some Policies".

That is maybe how you have approached life in Mexico and maybe it is working for you, but IMO a newbie inquirer needs to hear that this recommendation may have significant holes in it and potentially "dire circumstances" in the event of an accident. But at the end of the day (yes, I know, a tired expression) the inquirer will make up his/her own mind about what kind of advice to accept and what to reject.

Peace, brother.

 

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Chillin has answered his own concern, “.....plates, which must show an up to date insurance sticker while being driven in Canada.“  That matches the language in the Jalisco transito rules, which require that any vehicle being driven in Mexico with foreign plates must be legally authorized to be driven in its home jurisdiction.

Spencer has posted the Jalisco traffic laws, if you wish to pour through them. I did that years ago and have no doubt of what is stated or intended.  Reading Spanish is good practice, and there are hundreds of pages at your disposal.  Enjoy.

Newbies:  Beware of suggestions that make no logical sense, and definitely beware of suggestions that you try to bend, twist, avoid or otherwise evade the laws of Mexico and its various states.  Scofflaws do this at their eventual peril. The risks are not worth it.  It is easy enough to land in a Mexican jail, even when you have obeyed all the laws.  It takes them time to investigate.

 

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