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Where to sign up for Seguro Popular


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2 hours ago, Snowball said:

Funny how topics get "Hi-Jacked" so easily. This thread started out with the Seguro Popular discussion and somehow got onto real estate stuff. I recently got kicked out of IMSS after 8 years because I didn't have my documents "Stamped" by the Mexican Consulate (in Canada) to re-apply for this year. So, I am looking toward Seguro Popular as a replacement since I am not eligible for any Canadian assistance.  What is a going rate for this alternate health care? I saw a bunch of typical questions they ask you, but how does that relate (in Pesos) for a fee? If they think that I am rich (on my pension), what kind of rate would that look like for me and my wife?

Consult an attorney perhaps?

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39 minutes ago, Snowball said:

Pappy: Thanx for your help.

De nada.  Might as well get the straight scoop on something this important.  A restaurant suggestion or where to buy such and such is a great question for a chat board.  Something as important as health coverage demands a more professional answer.  Best of luck finding what works best for you.

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There are too many variables.  Single or family? Rent or own? Dirt or tile or cement? Bathrooms? US red or blue? Speak 1, 2, 3, or more languages? Is a Pinto animal or vegetable?

Just go, apply, hold your breath, wait...........

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6 minutes ago, RVGRINGO said:

There are too many variables.  Single or family? Rent or own? Dirt or tile or cement? Bathrooms? US red or blue? Speak 1, 2, 3, or more languages? Is a Pinto animal or vegetable?

Just go, apply, hold your breath, wait...........

Exactly..........

Or go see an attorney, for short money, and learn what the law says you should be charged and with that knowledge go forth by yourself or with one of the attorney's employees and see what shakes out. Knowledge is sometimes power, not always in Mexico, or you can decide to believe whatever answer is posted closest to noon on an odd numbered day, if it's not raining at the time.  Best of luck.

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After just spent another ten days care in a public hospital, accepting Seguro Popular, I may be able to offer some insight. First of all cost of membership = 0 pesos if you are over 60. This is currently is a three year term. Who knows what comes next? Seguro Popular is "free" in the sense of universal healthcare in Canada and the U.K. - it is actually funded by taxes. In Mexico the 16% I.V.A.. Seguro Popular is still rapidly expanding facilities, equipment and staff, this trend is expected to continue because  it is always popular with voters. The hospital I was in, for the third time now, with 250 beds is always full at this time. They have another 350 beds coming online in September, the brand new building is already built. The old hospital is run down, physically looking, it will be renovated. Some patients, used to state of the art hospitals in the North might feel intimidated - but it is very clean, and the staff and doctors are first rate, and seem to enjoy working there. The fourth floor, which I call the "comedy" floor has some of the funniest characters I have ever met (imagine three "Mexican" Robin Williams, all on the same shift - i haven't laughed so hard for years.) There is still the need of private fundraising, and this is an excellent opportunity for expats. For example, the Guadalajara Bomberos are fund raising for a Seguro Popular specialised ward for children burn victims. If you see photos of their Guadalajara fundraising efforts, you will see a lot of (mostly elderly) pale faces, and a lot of people having fun.

The idea of hiring a lawyer to join Seguro Popular is ridiculous. Imagine bringing a lawyer along to signup to B.C. Medical or OHIP in Canada! Actually getting out (discharged) from a Seguro Popular facility is much more difficult. Firstly the issue of discharge papers, which list every procedure/pharmaceutical (I always supply my own), takes two to 4 hours, depending on case load. Which then has to go to the Social Worker, who determines any charges, not covered by Seguro Popular. Then to Seguro Popular office, in the hospital, then to cashier, the back to Social Worker for final signature. Yesterday, Ms. Chillin performed all these steps with very little Spanish (our usual translator was already booked), I am quite proud of her. The whole process can take up to 6 hours.

As far as costs, private email me as to the type of costs you might anticipate and I can probably give you with some "what ifs". These are public ward beds, and I have (again) met some wonderful Mexican people and learned much more Spanish and a greater appreciation of some finer points of Mexican culture. Sorry, I just can't imagine sitting in a private room, for $500 U.S. per day, watching a very few English TV channels -to me - sad and boring, to others a necessity, well worth the money.

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On ‎6‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 2:15 PM, CHILLIN said:

More importantly - do you speak Spanish? If not, they have politely requested you bring along a translator. If you do not bring a translator - they may not be polite anymore. In fact, is an easy process once you go through it, or used to the Mexican way of doing things, but you would be best to hire a facilitator to make sure they open a file and give you your booklet. Then you have to go in an early morning lineup to get an appointment to see who will become your Doctor. The appointment will usually be the same day. The doctor will measure you, weigh you, ask questions for your file. The other thing to remember, is that although Seguro Popular now covers 266 conditions, and generally has a well stocked pharmacy, if any procedures are not covered they refer to private hospitals and clinics who have agreed to provide services at Mexican prices, not gringo prices. A substantial difference.

I would say you have to sign up at the Seguro Popular Community clinic in Chapala, on Flavio. You don't have go to in early for this.

The process is quite different in Jocotepc. It makes you wonder.

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Thanks to all for your feedback. I think I have enough info to make an informed decision whether it is the right thing to do and sign up. I was recently directed (by a fellow member of this site) to the "Official" SP website. The entire website is in Spanish (and I am continuously improving my skills with that), so I reverted to Google Translate to help me. It seems like a real good system, so I will try to get the correct documentation together and see if they accept me. Again, thanks to all for your help with my question.

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On ‎5‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 12:51 PM, annadon7 said:

Does anyone know where to sign up for SP in the Jocotepec municipality?

 

When I signed up in Jocotepec you were supposed to be able to do it a the hospital but they weren't doing it there right then so they sent us to the SP office on Donato Guerra. You did not have to be assigned to a doctor. 

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On ‎6‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 7:54 AM, Sonia said:

Even if CURP is not on your visa it may exist. Chapala INM was one of the few offices that did not for a long time add it to you visa You can search as per my web site: http://www.soniadiaz.mx/etc..html

As to RFC I obtain them for clients frequently as it is all done on-line. There is no need to go to SAT. I mention it here: http://www.soniadiaz.mx/real-estate.html

A temporary or permanent resident is to get tax exemption on the sale of a principal residence every 3 years and not just a PR. If told otherwise find another notario.

I am processing 5 Seguro Popular memberships today just in case expats are excluded from SP starting next week. 

 

 

 

 

Odd thing. When I came here 9 years ago I got an official green laminated CURP card. This week I am going to Guadalajara to renew my Jalisco drivers license and they want to see my CURP. They won't accept the CURP card because of forgery problems so you have to go online and print out the CURP. It is the same number and name but what they want now is a full sized piece of paper rather than the little card.

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16 minutes ago, cedros said:

Odd thing. When I came here 9 years ago I got an official green laminated CURP card. This week I am going to Guadalajara to renew my Jalisco drivers license and they want to see my CURP. They won't accept the CURP card because of forgery problems so you have to go online and print out the CURP. It is the same number and name but what they want now is a full sized piece of paper rather than the little card.

Amazing,  you have to wonder if this is some local/ individual bureaucrat who decides these "wants"

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7 minutes ago, lakeside7 said:

Amazing,  you have to wonder if this is some local/ individual bureaucrat who decides these "wants"

Yes.

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One problem I find with Seguro Popular is that if you're hospitalized, you must have a caregiver with you 24/7, even if you're ambulatory.  For Mexican patients, that's usually not a problem, because they have large families who can take turns being with them.  If you're alone down here, you have to hire caregivers, most of whom don't speak or understand English.  Plus, if you're in there for a long time, the cost adds up quickly.  The main reason that I had to sign up with Seguro Popular is because I have a very small pension, and I can't afford to hire caregivers.

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1 hour ago, suegarn said:

One problem I find with Seguro Popular is that if you're hospitalized, you must have a caregiver with you 24/7, even if you're ambulatory.  For Mexican patients, that's usually not a problem, because they have large families who can take turns being with them.  If you're alone down here, you have to hire caregivers, most of whom don't speak or understand English.  Plus, if you're in there for a long time, the cost adds up quickly.  The main reason that I had to sign up with Seguro Popular is because I have a very small pension, and I can't afford to hire caregivers.

Isn't it the same with IMSS.

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2 hours ago, suegarn said:

One problem I find with Seguro Popular is that if you're hospitalized, you must have a caregiver with you 24/7, even if you're ambulatory.  For Mexican patients, that's usually not a problem, because they have large families who can take turns being with them.  If you're alone down here, you have to hire caregivers, most of whom don't speak or understand English.  Plus, if you're in there for a long time, the cost adds up quickly.  The main reason that I had to sign up with Seguro Popular is because I have a very small pension, and I can't afford to hire caregivers.

How did chillin  resolve this problem?

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47 minutes ago, barcelonaman said:

How did chillin  resolve this problem?

When I started off, I always brought a Guadalajara savvy driver and an excellent medical translator (pm for referral). Then I began to understand that is more about the procedures than language, no matter your fluency level. The higher level staff almost always speak fair to excellent English. The lower level staff, fortunately a very few of them, only speak basic Spanish and take their jobs far too seriously. They are the most difficult to deal with, but this is the case nearly everywhere in Mexico. The medical translator explained to the social worker that I was fully capable of looking after myself but that he could be there in 70 minutes, 24/7. As far as family and Spanish being a necessity in Mexico, it is most certainly the norm, it is by no means enforceable in terms of human rights, gauranteed under the Seguro Popular contracts. How can they insist that only Spanish be spoken when there are 46 languages in Mexico, many people, for example from Oaxaca, do not speak Spanish. Insisting that family take care of you, another problem, not all people have a large family to call upon, certainly many gringos, who maybe because of the loss of partner, or just people who prefer to live alone, cannot be denied treatment. The last patient beside me was Mexican, in his 30's, very sick (generally) and his brain was fried. I am certain he was abandoned, and a religious organisation volunteered to help him as much as possible. For some reason, he seemed to have peaved his volunteer helper, and on the day I left, she never showed up to help feed him, etc. He looked scared. If he was in Canada, he would probably be in an assisted living facility - if there was an advocate and space available. In other words, whether expat or Mexican, the hospital is worried about abandoned patients, but they seem very unclear in how to prevent it. Do you? What I do know, they are not going to kick you out on the street because you only speak Slovenian, and your family is long and far away.

At the same time though, taking the time to learn intermediate Spanish, and claim that you belong to a local community group, church or Druid prayer circle, willing to help you while in hospital, will make things much easier for everybody.

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13 hours ago, lakeside7 said:

Are you required to supply  your own sheets,pillows etc?

Absolutely not! I have never seen people change a bed so fast, usually once a day, maybe more for "accidents". They have toilet paper most of the time, the worst part, which anyone who has spent anytime in Mexico knows, is the old time habit of disposing all toilet paper goods in the alongside trash can. My first time in, the admitting nurse insisted on no pillows/blankets - all clothes plastic bagged. Now they seem to have a quarantine section, I thought it was palliative care, but they said no. Two people died there when I was there. On the same day, a very old man on the general ward I was on also died. He had 24/7 caregivers, My guess is the family paid for as a sort of condition of being on that ward, hoping for a miracle - which never came for him. Also on the same day, a young man, slim in his late twenties, with a beautiful girlfriend and a very nice mother, was in for an operation to remove thrombosis veins in his arm. He went into cardiac arrest just after returning from surgery. I couldn,t leave the room because I had a bent IV needle in me, and the last thing they needed at that time was blood spurting everywhere. So the medical team, led by a cardiac emergency specialist, about three doctors, I don,t know many interns and nurses went into a desperate "code blue" reponse, complete with crash cart, defib, adrenaline, tried valiantly to restart his heart. After about one hour, they called it. I was very upset about this death, but my Dr. told me that he had been seriously ill for a number of years, the last were "bonus" years for him.

No one has addressed the number 1, SP nightmare, probably more imagined at this time. A foreign couple receives Temporal visas fairly easy. Gets on to SP fairly easily (preconditions exempted). One of the couple gets into chronic care in hospital, the other flies back to their home country, never to be seen or heard from again. Mexico cannot afford that type of abuse. So there might be changes in the future-only covering valid permanent residents/immigrants for example. Who knows? Early days.

 

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