Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

UV light to sanitize pool water


cedros
 Share

Recommended Posts

Is anyone on this board familar with using UV light to sanitize pool water? Either in Mexico or up north.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't be so sure tomgates. UV sanitizing may be the method of the future as it has many advantages over chlorine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesn't create a residual, hence there is no protection for any of the water in the pool except that passing through the UV sanitizer.

It will reduce chemical usage.

Google "UV for pool sanitation" to find many references and sources for the hardware.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is an interesting review of the UV system. Since it is plumbed into the system after the filter, not sure how you would treat water you have to add because of evaporation. Anyway:  http://poolservicema.com/product-reviews/uv-pool-system-reviews/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Mainecoons said:

It doesn't create a residual, hence there is no protection for any of the water in the pool except that passing through the UV sanitizer.

It will reduce chemical usage.

Google "UV for pool sanitation" to find many references and sources for the hardware.

 

I've done lots of Googling but I was hoping to hear from real people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, tomgates said:

Here is an interesting review of the UV system. Since it is plumbed into the system after the filter, not sure how you would treat water you have to add because of evaporation. Anyway:  http://poolservicema.com/product-reviews/uv-pool-system-reviews/

You would have to wait for the water to pass through the filters and UV system.

Thanks for the interesting article.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, El Saltos said:

Besides, to keep it clean via UV you'd have to run the pump a lot!

You would use a low "speed" pump. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A variable speed pump is double the cost of a regular pump and the on going additional cost of electricity to run the pump 10-12 hrs vs mine running 4.5 hrs. Not sure if it is worth it. The salt water pool and the chlorine production it makes is a very comfortable water on both the eyes and skin. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

UV for a pool would seem like a strange idea; like taking a bath in bottled water...... It is no longer “pure“ the moment you touch it. From that point onward, chlorine or bromine is needed; by whatever method you choose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Three pump options..single speed 115v or 220v, variable speed with chip on board ($), and two speed 220v with manual switch.  Single speed uses the most electricity.  Variable speed pumps are the most expensive to purchase. The. control boards do not do well here and are expensive to replace.  The two speed pumps on low speed use the least electricity.  You will need to switch to hi speed if you are pushing water thru roof mounted solar panels. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/6/2017 at 8:16 PM, cedros said:

You would use a low "speed" pump. 

Exactly right.  In response to the OP's requests for personal experiences: We've successfully used UV sterlizers on large aquaria, spas, and small pools since the 1980's.

Note that scientists have reported the residual disinfecting power of sufficiently large UV sterilizers.   As long as your water does not have suspended sediments or lots of suspended organic matter (aka gunk or protein scum),   then UV sterilization converts some of the dissolved Oxygen in the water into Ozone,   which acts as a residual disinfectant out in the pool or spa.   The residual ozone is a strong oxidizer that damages viruses & bacteria.  Once the residual ozone reacts with organic matter in the bulk water, it is converted to  hydroxide radicals,  which also act as residual disinfectants.

For these reasons,  our aquaria, pools & spas with UV disinfection have consistently smelled 'sweet' for the last 30 years - due to the low levels of residual ozone in the water.   With an adequately large sterilizer,  there has been enough residual ozone in the water to even kill algae in the surrounding nearby damp areas - outside of the underwater areas.

To remain effective, UV sterilizers do require 2 bits of maintenance.  1) The amount of UV output decays over time, so, it is important to replace the bulbs at the manufacturer's noted frequency (typically once a year).    2) The wet surfaces of the quartz sleeve(s) of the UV sterilizer can accumulate 'gunk' over time,  and can require wiping~cleaning.


Re El Saltos'  comment about  'not worth the expense':  I'd agree that a good ozonator,  paired with a good circulator pump & Mazzi injector,   is  a far better and far less expensive option for pools & spas.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...