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High Incidence of Kidney Failure Cases near Chapala


El Bizco

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So are you willing to sit in the dark when the wind isn't blowing or the sun isn't shining?

Otherwise and unless you live in the few places where hydro can provide base load, it is going to be either nuclear or fossil fuel to keep the lights on.

And all fossil fuel puts out CO2.  Nat gas is displacing coal because the power plants cost a small fraction of the cost of a coal plant with its massive scrubbers.  When gas prices were much higher, most of the utilities were using them for peak load but now they are being used for base load too.

And there's a significant environmental cost associated with the production of it as well.  This is true of ALL forms of energy, base load or renewable.

As for the bird kill, after reviewing the literature on this I have to conclude that no one has a clue.  There's been no organized body counting at all the wind farm sites.  It sure needs to be done.

 

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7 minutes ago, Xena said:

Millions? Audubon disagrees with Ned's figures. And, also has current information on what is being done about it. 

http://www.audubon.org/news/will-wind-turbines-ever-be-safe-birds

Really. In that piece of fluff Audubon has an "estimated" high of over 300,000 kills in North America alone which probably only refers to the United states and doesn't include Canada which has dramatically increased kills in the last several years because more wind farms have been built. And lets not forget Europe especially Germany. And don't forget Australia. I have personally seen the devastation near Brooks, Alberta where one of these charmers was built on a major migratory bird flyway on a ridge in open prairie. I wonder how the roughly 200 remaining Whooping Cranes enjoy these on their flyway. Are there any left? No matter what is done with these, mortality can only be reduced not eliminated.  So people in various jurisdictions around the world have started voting to not having then built and even removed. Awindfarm builder is sueing the Ontario Gov't for breach of contract.

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6 minutes ago, Mainecoons said:

.

As for the bird kill, after reviewing the literature on this I have to conclude that no one has a clue.  There's been no organized body counting at all the wind farm sites.  It sure needs to be done.

 

Just google "wind farm bird kill pictures". I just did it again and one of the pics was in Spain with the citation that an estimated 6-18million birds and bats are killed there annually.

the dead birds I saw near brooks looked like a carpet and even in the fall the stink was overwhelming.

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2 hours ago, Xena said:

Millions? Audubon disagrees with Ned's figures. And, also has current information on what is being done about it. 

http://www.audubon.org/news/will-wind-turbines-ever-be-safe-birds

In your haste once more to discredit,you failed to read it  and they haven't disagreed with my figures and haven't written about anything that "works" in keeping birds safe current or otherwise.

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1 hour ago, ned small said:

In your haste once more to discredit,you failed to read it  and they haven't disagreed with my figures and haven't written about anything that "works" in keeping birds safe current or otherwise.

My, my, my. I see you have lost none of your sensitivity to be disagreed with. I really do not care enough about the issue or you to get into some tired, old whizzing contest. Been there. Done that. Waste of precious time.

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On ‎3‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 10:29 AM, Yo1 said:

The Lerma River flows INTO Lake Chapala and the Santiago flows OUT of the lake as it goes north of Guadalajara on it's way to the ocean.

I have read, like Mainecoons, that water no long flows into the Santiago from the lake so it no longer performs the function of an outflow to Lake Chapala.  Reasons seem to be the lower levels of the lake in recent decades and the massive pumping station of water from the Lake to local farms just outside of Ocotlan, the site of the Santiago.

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8 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

So are you willing to sit in the dark when the wind isn't blowing or the sun isn't shining?

Otherwise and unless you live in the few places where hydro can provide base load, it is going to be either nuclear or fossil fuel to keep the lights on.

 

Now, Mainecoons, you and I wouldn`t want to hijack this topic, right? but I must respond:

" it is going to be either nuclear or fossil fuel to keep the lights on"

For the immediate now, but not for much longer.  As of a year ago, solar generation was cheaper than fossil fuels in 30 countries and the price point is going down rapidly.  Coal electrical generation in the US is becoming history.

" sit in the dark when the wind isn't blowing or the sun isn't shining"

Except for excess solar energy storage on the grid and batteries, techologies that are growing fast.

Fossil fuel time is running out.

 

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15 minutes ago, bdmowers said:

 

Fossil fuel time is running out.

 

Agree. But, certainly not in our lifetime.

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4 minutes ago, mtech1950 said:

bdmowers, need to do a little more research regarding solar

Yup, he does.

Actually I'm following a development that could complete change the equation for solar and remove that problem of when the sun doesn't shine.  Progress is being made on direct solar cracking of water into hydrogen and oxygen (what we've traditionally seen done with electrolysis) resulting in a transportable fuel that can be used to generate power when and where needed and produce no NOx or CO2 or any of that other bad stuff.

Coal electrical generation has declined in the U.S. simply because, for the moment, NG is so cheap and the power plants that use it are so cheap that coal can't compete.  Question is, how long will the NG last?  Another question is the wisdom of using a highly transportable energy source that is perfect for heating buildings to make power.

IMO if solar and wind have a future it is not as a direct baseline source to electrical grids.  Certainly in places that have a ton of sunshine and don't require a lot of heating or cooling, solar MIGHT make it possible to go off grid comfortably providing at some point we get much better batteries than are available now.  For example, probably no more than a dozen more panels at our place plus good batteries would make that possible for us and we do have the roof space for them.

It has been in the back of my mind to make this conversion if the storage technology shows up.

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Nucleur is of course the only real solution. Eventually we will figure out what to do with the waste. Solar and wind production of electricity are becoming a blight on the earth. Almost unlimited potential for nucleur. Fossil fuels are on the way out.

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14 hours ago, Hud said:

Agree. But, certainly not in our lifetime.

As you and I are checking out here (max: 20 years?) , the world will be a very different place, energy-wise. 

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I agree with Cedros - nuclear. Mexico has two nuclear power generators. The newest technologies have proven their safety, and once the public gets used to this idea, we will see its miniaturization. First, reactors to feed small towns, off the main grid. Second step, things like cruise ships and freighters - which create tremendous amounts of air pollution at this time. Next, train locomotives, then tractor trailers. These nuclear engines are nothing more than self contained steam generators. Also Mexico has yet to explore small scale hydro power generation. There are many locations where this would be viable in this country. As far as batteries, to store solar generated power, there have been a number of huge breakthroughs, driven by the electric vehicle industry. I think Tesla has a technology they are about to put in production.

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Solar energy is currently more viable economically than nuclear energy:

https://cleantechnica.com/.../cost-of-solar-power-vs-cost-of-wind-power-coal-nuclear-...

energypost.eu/renewable-energy-versus-nuclear-dispelling-myths/

https://www.theguardian.com › Environment › Renewable energy

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Another take on the kidney failure topic: I just read an online article that has a different explanation for recent high incidence of kidney failure, specifically among farm workers in El Salvador. It's at BBC-Earth http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170418-climate-change-is-turning-dehydration-into-a-deadly-disease. The findings show a correlation between kidney failure and people working outdoors in extreme high temperatures. One researcher comments, “The areas [including Mexico and Central America] that have the highest solar radiation and heatwaves are overlapping the places right where the [chronic kidney failure] epidemics are.” Anecdotal evidence from El Salvador supports this claim.

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