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High Incidence of Kidney Failure Cases near Chapala


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Kidney problems are passed from generationto generation.  With inter-marriage and small villages these types of problems are not unknown and need to be explored as a reason, not an excuse.  Education is a factor in eradicating generational disease.  Third world countries and the health organizations which service them are learning to differentiate between causes of disease which originate in the environment and those which are a result of inbreeding, for lack of a more delicate way to say it.

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There are at least two separate issues here. One is the effect of agricultural runoff around Poncitlan and the other is the effect of industrial waste being dumped in the Rio Santiago as it nears Guadalajara. Here's a stunning video from Greenpeace which shows just how nasty this river gets in the vicinity of El Salto.

 

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The last time I was at el Salto (last fall) there were many of those balls of foam floating through the air. They say one of the worst polluters of the Santiagao is the river that runs into it that passes by the airport and picks up all their sewage. Plus dead dogs etc. They say the Santiago has been cleaned up quite a bit since Greenpeace was there. 

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59 minutes ago, cedros said:

The last time I was at el Salto (last fall) there were many of those balls of foam floating through the air. They say one of the worst polluters of the Santiagao is the river that runs into it that passes by the airport and picks up all their sewage. Plus dead dogs etc. They say the Santiago has been cleaned up quite a bit since Greenpeace was there. 

Exactly,it has been improved over the last several years. Green Peace is noted for their spin doctoring. Oh, and this has nothing, geographically speaking, to do with the OP does it.

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13 hours ago, ned small said:

Exactly,it has been improved over the last several years. Green Peace is noted for their spin doctoring. Oh, and this has nothing, geographically speaking, to do with the OP does it.

Really, you think Greenpeace put all that foam in the water that you see in the photo or photoshopped it? Get real.

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10 hours ago, mudgirl said:

Really, you think Greenpeace put all that foam in the water that you see in the photo or photoshopped it? Get real.

No - actually the Federal and State governments have spent multi-millions of pesos to clean this mess up. John Pint, a Guadalajara Reporter writer and environmental activist, took a field trip to the old waterfall (the Niagra of Mexico, former tourist town, and wool factory) and reports it is almost back to the old days. There is one more stage to go, but they are 2/3's of the way there. Good News for the Eastern Pacific Coast. Although many of the coastal towns in Nayarit still have huge sewage disposal problems of their own. Sayulita for example. People getting sick and weird rashes.

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On 4/3/2017 at 8:42 AM, CHILLIN said:

No - actually the Federal and State governments have spent multi-millions of pesos to clean this mess up. John Pint, a Guadalajara Reporter writer and environmental activist, took a field trip to the old waterfall (the Niagra of Mexico, former tourist town, and wool factory) and reports it is almost back to the old days. There is one more stage to go, but they are 2/3's of the way there. Good News for the Eastern Pacific Coast. Although many of the coastal towns in Nayarit still have huge sewage disposal problems of their own. Sayulita for example. People getting sick and weird rashes.

 

Your optimism really isn't justified IMHO.  As I've noted previously, the problem here is corruption not technology.  There is treatment technology for all of the wastes in these rivers and these companies use them where they are required to by honest governments.

One has to wonder how much of those pesos are treating wastes and how much of them are being stolen by the usual suspects.  And of course that has nothing to do at all with the industrial waste problem which puts the really nasty stuff into the air and water.

I found it more than a little ironic that the governor of Jalisco, a state with truly foul air and water, actually had the nerve to criticize U.S. policies on the environment recently.  It would be laughable if it wasn't so sad.

The soap suds are very much in evidence still at that waterfall, or is it sewagefall on the north side of GDL.

 

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It’s widely known that Lake Chapala is toxic. The Lerma River, which feeds the lake, has been polluted by untreated wastewater for twenty years. This isn’t news and it isn’t an anomaly: an estimated 70% of Mexico’s rivers are open-air sewers, in large part because the government has failed to enforce laws defining what can and cannot be dumped into the water. According to a recent article in the online publication Mexico News Daily, the country “produces 6,700 million cubic meters of wastewater, a figure that will increase to 9,200 million cubic meters by 2030. Only 38 percent of wastewater is currently treated in accordance with regulations.” Elias Cattan, an environmental activist and the founder of a Mexico City–based architectural firm, tells me, “What you have is government in collusion with industry.”

By industry, he means the nearly 9,000 companies with facilities along the Lerma River, including Coca-Cola, Nissan, and Bimbo, Mexico’s largest bread company. “Businesses invest millions in pretending to have treatment systems,” Cattan tells me. “They prefer to fake it than to actually pay for good treatment systems. They prefer an easy fix. So what’s happening in this country is we’re killing people with our rivers. There’s no accountability.”

 

(From Fickepie's reference)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you Sr. Burton for your help in getting to the root of this. So this poor creature, a Manatee, showing no visible signs of attempted "slaughtering", lived to 60 days after it's release? The scientists must have been watching this eco-experiment very closely. It failed, and the "savage" fishers of Lake Chapala took the blame. Thank God, (it is Easter Sunday, so I am allowed to say that once a year) I am now retired and can turn my back on this world and the never ending malfeasances passed in the name of science and progress.

Now to the more difficult questions. Why do alien spaceships need navigation lights and what are they doing in the depths of Lake Chapala? Paul Hellyer, former Defence Minister for Canada, claimed to know, but I am sceptical about that too.

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On April 4, 2017 at 10:12 AM, ficklepie said:

Out today in Harper's, "Under the Surface: Investigating chronic kidney disease in Jalisco, Mexico"

http://harpers.org/blog/2017/04/under-the-surface/

 

Thank you for sharing that April/2017 article with us.

I wonder how many are experiencing kidney malfunction, in our expat population,

their pets included.  I say their pets, for I have noted what seems like a unusually 

high amount of people stating their pets have kidney issues/died from kidney issues.

This being stated is usually followed with "I have had pets all my life (NOB) which never had 

these issues.  Anyone care to touch base/raise hand if your family member or your pet has

developed such challenges, post relocation SOB?

As much as we do not want hear this type of review of Lake Chapala, 

we must consider that environment most likely has something to do with this.

As per the above article: http://harpers.org/blog/2017/04/under-the-surface/

While it is true that poverty exposes these poor families to an increase in Kidney Failure:
 
The following facts stand out: 
 
1) The state of Jalisco has the second-highest incidence of kidney disease in the world.
 
2) A polluted water supply doesn’t help. The state of Jalisco has the second-highest incidence of kidney disease in the world.
It’s widely known that Lake Chapala is toxic. The Lerma River, which feeds the lake, has been polluted by untreated wastewater for twenty years. This isn’t news and it isn’t an anomaly: an estimated 70% of Mexico’s rivers are open-air sewers, in large part because the government has failed to enforce laws defining what can and cannot be dumped into the water.
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15 minutes ago, Crazydog said:

How much do you trust "organic" vegetables and meat in Mexico? Are there any farms around here that sell these products. 

I trust them just as much as I trust our local government to do what is right for the people they serve.

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What I found really laughable if not downright incredible recently was the governor of Jalisco lecturing the U.S. about the environment.  Even more laughable was the GDL Reporter printing his nonsense in their unending zeal to bash the current U.S. government.  

Someone from a state with the kind of filthy air and water this has, not to mention the potholed trash strewn roads, has a lot of nerve lecturing anyone about the environment or anything else for that matter.  Even assuming they stopped stealing half of the tax dollars tomorrow, it would take this country decades to catch up to the U.S. when it comes to the environment.

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17 minutes ago, john everett said:

So they found out the reason for the disease in agricultural workers was toxins such as herbicides and pesticides, but since people sweat more in the heat and their already damaged kidneys now have to work harder it must be climate change ?

So instead of fighting to ban the use of toxins in food which is the source of the problem, it's easier to blame the hotter than normal weather.

Who writes these articles ?

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4 hours ago, Crazydog said:

How much do you trust "organic" vegetables and meat in Mexico? Are there any farms around here that sell these products. 

I don't trust that the local farms, meet the highest level of organic status.

Spraying of plants with chemicals is just one part of a multifold process.  The soil, seed and environment have much to do with if a farm is able to be considered organic.  When the environment is lacking, then the final produce shall be as well. This goes way beyond choosing not to use toxic chemical sprays.

US Organic farmers have rules to follow, and third-party certifiers inspect their operations to make sure they're following the rules. Those certifiers also test a certain percentage of the product each year for illicit use of pesticides. Although certifiers are paid by the companies that they certify, their work is audited by the USDA.

Those are US standards.  What are the Mexico standards for our local farmers?

It takes years for a farm in the US to transition over to organic. It is quite a big deal and the steps leading up to the actual certification process are many.   

Is it any wonder that when the drinking water/produce/soil is compromised, that health (kidney etc) issues will present? In effect you are what you eat/drink/breathe.  

Kidney issues fall into one of three categories, Congenital, Acute and Chronic.  Only the first is passed down via genetics.  

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22 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

What I found really laughable if not downright incredible recently was the governor of Jalisco lecturing the U.S. about the environment.  Even more laughable was the GDL Reporter printing his nonsense in their unending zeal to bash the current U.S. government.  

Someone from a state with the kind of filthy air and water this has, not to mention the potholed trash strewn roads, has a lot of nerve lecturing anyone about the environment or anything else for that matter.  Even assuming they stopped stealing half of the tax dollars tomorrow, it would take this country decades to catch up to the U.S. when it comes to the environment.

According to the Guadalajara Reporter, Governor Sandoval was criticizing the new U.S. administration for relinquishing its leadership role in the effort to combat global warming by reneging on its commitment to the recent Paris accords on climate. I both agree with his comments and respect his right to speak freely on the subject. Here's a quote from the article:

"(His order) practically annuls the norms to combat global warming and is the first step in winding back one of the most significant accords in human history, COP21 in Paris," the governor said. "(Trump) is considering increasing military spending and energy generation through coal -- a stupid, retrograde step that represents a massive counter signal to the world."

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I stand by my comment.  The governor of Jalisco needs to clean up his own state first.  The filthy air of GDL and the dirty rivers everywhere are a disgrace and they are killing people.  The corruption that allows industries for which pollution control technology has been around for decades to literally get away with murder is criminal.

Not everyone buys into the climate hysteria either.  In fact, fewer all the time.  

And FYI

Quote
China is the largest coal consumer, accounting for 49% of the world's total coal. The next largest, the United States, consumed 11% of the world's total. China's coal consumption increased by more than 2.3 billion tons over the past 10 years, accounting for 83% of the global increase in coal consumption.May 14, 2014

Shall we shut down all the natural gas power plants next?

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/u.s.-natural-gas-co2-emissions-will-top-coal-emissions-in-2016

 

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I think that Governor Sandoval needs to mind his own business before he has time to mind others business. Corruption in government in Jalisco should occupy 100 % of his time, if he is actually doing his job, and he would have no time to comment on other countries. Lets see what is actually accomplished to help Jalisco by him and how much the cost was to the Mexican People so he can be judged by his "bang for the buck". So far, very little.

 

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2 hours ago, Mainecoons said:
Quote
China is the largest coal consumer, accounting for 49% of the world's total coal. The next largest, the United States, consumed 11% of the world's total. China's coal consumption increased by more than 2.3 billion tons over the past 10 years, accounting for 83% of the global increase in coal consumption.May 14, 2014

This is a cherry-picked article from 2014, the year in which coal use peaked in China. Here's some up-to-date info on China reducing its reliance on coal. In doing so, China is assuming the leadership role being vacated by the U.S. in the fight against global warming.

China coal consumption drops again

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/feb/29/china-coal-consumption-drops-again

 

And yes...it's time to shut down the natural-gas power plants as well due to the problem of methane leaking directly into the atmosphere before being burned at the power plants and during the fracking process to obtain it. Solar and wind power are available right now. They are cheaper sources of energy and cause no environment harm. Why not just do it?

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I too am suspect of MC's claims. There is a big move to fight corruption in Mexico, there seem to be arrests every week. In Mexico, as in nearly every country of the world, the corruption often goes hand in hand with organised crime. The fight against corruption is the fight against organised crime. There has never been a worse time in history to be corrupt - listening posts are everywhere, black ops equipment and skilled operators are in great oversupply.

In 2015, China entered its quest to become a mostly solar electric and solar hot water heated country. The results have been amazing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_China It is startling how much a country's cash flow and infrastructure can be upgraded, when not involved in nuclear arms races and far off military conflicts. Mexico should be working much closer with China to makes this revolution happen here too.

Also, here is that article by John Pint. Things are definitely happening to clean up pollution in Jalisco on a unprecedented scale.

http://saudicaves.com/mx/salto/index.html

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