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Was very recently in a town in Baja Cal. Sur where the stray problem was pretty bad. Still have been in other places in Mexico where the problem was virtually non-existant. How is it at Lakeside? Are there a lot of unleashed, uncollared dogs roaming the streets or is there some type of animal control in place? Are there many areas with dogs howling and barking during the wee hours?

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There are lots of homeless dogs and loose owned dogs on the streets. There is no official animal control. There are unofficial, volunteer rescue and shelter operations run by volunteers and private donations. There are some areas where barking, howling dogs are heard at all hours of the day and night, many areas where they are sometimes heard. If you can not adjust to that reality than this area is not for you. I can not speak to the rest of Mexico, but doubt there are many, if any, areas of Mexico that will be closer to what you are seeking. 

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The OP indicated that he has been other places in Mexico where the stray dog problem was "virtually non-existent". He asked specifically about the situation Lakeside. Telling him he doesn't belong in Mexico is not helpful.

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17 minutes ago, mudgirl said:

The OP indicated that he has been other places in Mexico where the stray dog problem was "virtually non-existent". He asked specifically about the situation Lakeside. Telling him he doesn't belong in Mexico is not helpful.

If you have to ask about digs in Mexico ....Mexico is not for you.... Maybe try Florida ..

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BTW I am not a dog hater.  In fact, we rescued a dog from one of the clubs many years ago. He lived with us in Ajijic for six years and then flew to the US with us ( first class no less) 1.5 years ago.  He is sleeping next to me on the sofa just now.  Currently Chucho and I are vacationing in Florida.  He is the joy of our lives (most of the times).  He can be a pill!

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If there are towns and villages in Mexico where the stray dog problem is virtually non-existent you probably do not want to know how that happens. I know there are places where the wholesale, painful slaughter of animals keeps the population down. On the other hand, if there are towns and villages in Mexico where sterilization programs are in place and utilized by all, where there are enough shelters and adoption programs, and where unadoptable/surplus dogs are humanly euthanized, please share the names of these places. We would love to hear the good news. 

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Here at Lakeside, some of us are working to improve the problem - Operation Amor had sterilized nearly 2500 dogs and cats in the years it had been in operation.The shelters provided temporary (sometimes permanent) homes for dogs in peril . We try to educate people about the difference between a reasonably happy healthy street dog, a dog who runs loose but has someone who feeds it and provides some degree of dare (try to get the dog spayed or neutered and leave it alone) and dogs who actually need to be rescued.

Is it perfect? Far from it. Is it better than some other places? I think so

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1 hour ago, MtnMama said:

Here at Lakeside, some of us are working to improve the problem - Operation Amor had sterilized nearly 2500 dogs and cats in the years it had been in operation.The shelters provided temporary (sometimes permanent) homes for dogs in peril . We try to educate people about the difference between a reasonably happy healthy street dog, a dog who runs loose but has someone who feeds it and provides some degree of dare (try to get the dog spayed or neutered and leave it alone) and dogs who actually need to be rescued.

Is it perfect? Far from it. Is it better than some other places? I think so

My guess is that there are very few if any other places in Mexico that do as much for its animal population, pets and strays, primarily due to joint efforts of local concerned Mexicans and the large expat population of which quite a few are involved in running shelters and sterilization clinics.  As far as barking, that depends a lot on where you live at Lakeside and who your neighbors are and how they control and treat their animals.  In the 11+ years I've lived here I've seen real advancement in the attitude of how animals should be treated due to various factors such as an educational program that teaches children about how animals should be treated and the sterilization programs like Operacion Amor in the municipio of Chapala and what was known as Operacion Compasion (recently changed its name but the new one escapes me at the moment) in the municipio of Jocotepec.  The state of Jalisco has also passed stricter laws regarding how animals should be treated, and that is indicative of more awareness in the Mexican population in this area. I f Hopeful Mex is greatly bothered by the plight of stray dogs (and cats) then he/she has two options in the decision to move here:  1.  Choose a place other than Mexico or other poorer spots where there is a more highly developed overall cultural  attitude towards the rights of animals and thus better treatment of them and government funds dedicated towards that end, or 2.  Come on down and help with the efforts described above to better the situation of dogs and cats, whether pets or strays.  For me, personally, volunteering at the sterilization clinics is the most rewarding effort I have been involved with here.  When one sees the people care about their pets enough to wait hours just for them to be taken into surgery and then more hours while they are operated on and in recovery, one realizes that cultural attitudes are changing and you are helping with that effort.  That is very satisfying.  Plus, if you work in recovery, you can cuddle the dogs and cats while they can't object.  That was my selfish plan when I started.  You can volunter at the various animal rescue shelters or help with fundraising activities. And, of course, adopting a dog or cat in need of a fur-ever home is a small step in the big picture of strays but a huge step in that animal's life.

As far as barking dogs again two recommendations:  2. Live in a fraccionamiento with strict policies that are enforced in regards to letting your dog(s) bark unnecessarily, incessantly, annoyingly, or 2. Live in a sparsely populated area or even way out in the country with no close neighbors.

 

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No one has to live with barking dogs. I have three and they are happy to support their compadres, but, we don't let them. If people don't respond to polite requests. Three a.m. calls sometimes help. They just need to be reminded. If all else fails, written complaints submitted to Ecology with and stamped copy returned will eventually work, if enough people complain. This applies to all noise sources.

 

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Stray street dogs and cats are a sign of poverty. This is true all over the world. If you don't like living in areas of poverty, don't do so - but be willing to pay the price. Lived many years in Southside/Los Muertos area of Puerto Vallarta. There used to be beach/street dogs there, but not anymore. Now just roaming packs of wealthy tourists.

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7 minutes ago, CHILLIN said:

Stray street dogs and cats are a sign of poverty. This is true all over the world. If you don't like living in areas of poverty, don't do so - but be willing to pay the price. Lived many years in Southside/Los Muertos area of Puerto Vallarta. There used to be beach/street dogs there, but not anymore. Now just roaming packs of wealthy tourists.

LOL

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 Vet Eric behind the mercado was told that there will be a culling of street dogs shortly as is done from time to time by the policia in the Muni toto perhaps and not just Chapala. If you've been here long enough you know this is not a new state of affairs. He caters to a couple of street dogs and for the time being will lock them in his office at night as a precaution.

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The last time I heard of this happening was just before I moved here so over 10 years ago.  The government posted warnings to keep your dogs in on the day  and all uncollared dogs were shot.  

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4 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

Stray street dogs and cats are a sign of poverty. This is true all over the world. If you don't like living in areas of poverty, don't do so - but be willing to pay the price. Lived many years in Southside/Los Muertos area of Puerto Vallarta. There used to be beach/street dogs there, but not anymore. Now just roaming packs of wealthy tourists.

LOL!  But there are exceptions to those rules.  Lots of poverty in rural Vietnam and in Thailand but not many strays in most areas.  That's because they are captured and eaten.  I just was listening to a report on NPR about areas in India where it is against the law to kill and eat cattle, considered the height of barbarity.  Lots of stray cattle in those areas.  It's all relative……….

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It is not that big of issue here in Ajijic and I walk all over town. You have to separate true street dogs from "porch dogs", that is dogs that are owned by someone and spend time in front of the house. 

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The garbage dumps in Thailand are teeming with mangy stray dogs so I guess those are saved because they are not appetizing.

Most dogs in Ajijic are owned by someone and live on the street. Here in San Cristobal it is the same we have 3 or 4 dogs that live in the street and are fed everyday by their owners..just because dogs are wandering around , it does not mean they are stray dogs

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The main problem in this area , inconsiderate animal owners...if 2 are good the 8 must be better. Many folks who leave their animals unattended or with maid have no idea of the problem of barking etc., and when approached fail to accept the noise happens. 

There was a time when you showed photos of your grand kids now Lakesiders bore you with their pets.

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You are very brave to bring up the subject of stray and or unleashed dogs in this forum.   In my opinion there are a lot of both in Ajijic.  The worst offenders however are the pet owners who let their dogs (big and small) roam freely while truly believing that their dogs have some special privilege and should be allowed to run free wherever they are, and crap wherever they want.   We are near the malecon and frequently have  dogs (with owners in the park) run into our yard when we open the gate and crap and run around & do as they wish.  Some of these dogs are quite large and it is a bit scary to try and get them out because you do not know their temperment so getting them out is always a stresser.  While walking our little dog on the malecon, our dog has been attacked by loose dogs but fortunately not hurt badly.   It is also a case of dodge the dog crap on the malecon which is extremely unfortunate.  I don't understand these people at all.  They cannot comprehend that their dog might be either a threat or a nuisance to other people who just want to enjoy a nice walk by the water.

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We have walked our dogs by the lake for the last 16 years and one boxer once attacked one of our dog but did not hurt her and that is about it. Dogs running lose are usually dangerous  or aggressive as they are well socialized, the dogs on the leash are the problem in  my experience so dog crap so do horses, donkeys cows, birds and fish and we all survive.

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14 hours ago, bmh said:

The garbage dumps in Thailand are teeming with mangy stray dogs so I guess those are saved because they are not appetizing.

Most dogs in Ajijic are owned by someone and live on the street. Here in San Cristobal it is the same we have 3 or 4 dogs that live in the street and are fed everyday by their owners..just because dogs are wandering around , it does not mean they are stray dogs

Probably a lot more strays in Thailand than in Vietnam where they are actually very rare.  I don't think that in Thailand it is as culturally acceptable to eat dogs as it is in Vietnam but Thailand has become a source of illegal stray dog smuggling trade and export to Vietnam to supply the increasing demand for dog meat.  I remember years ago when living in Anaheim California, our neighboring town of Garden Grove got a huge influx of Vietnamese refugees as the South Vietnamese government came to an end.  There was talk that the stray dog population disappeared completely in the surrounding areas and the dog catchers were put out of business.

I know I'm going to get a lot of flak for the following comment but maybe Vietnamese immigration should be encouraged to the Lakeside area.  Would give a whole new meaning to "Perritos Calientes".  Sorry, I couldn't help myself…….

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