Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Real Estate Questions to ask


Zeb
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am compiling of list of questions that should be asked prior to purchasing a home here.  I have real estate experience from the US, however, the things we need to ask here seem to be different. There is no benefit of seller disclosure.

I'd appreciate the benefit of anyone's experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fault lines anywhere near property.  Sewer goes where?  Water comes from where?  Water potable?  Flooding during the rainy season?  Roof leak? (you can usually see this by the salitre on the ceiling)  If fracc, what are fees and for what?  Evento place close?  Talk with neighbors as you would in the US.  How close is nearest Catholic Church? (cohetes).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless you get your questions answered in writing and signed and witnessed any answers to your questions are meaningless and have no legal status. You must assume full responsibility for verifying the veracity of the answers you are given. There are no consumer laws in Mexico to help you as a homebuyer. There isn't even any licensing or mandatory training and education for real estate agents here.

This is truly a different world and you have full responsibility for protecting yourself.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interestingly, agents generally belong to the Chapala Association of Realtors (CAR) and pay fees for membership and training. Most of them keep this up, regardless of the controversy in recent years. In Canada, my Mom paid ridiculous fees for training, licensing and memberships... most of which was unnecessary, because she had the brains to research it all herself. Nothing, in the end, beats experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And, if you are looking at one of the older homes in one of the "village" neighborhoods, there are extra pitfalls. The owner is supposed to warrant that the utilities have been separated from other properties.  After the escrow closes, good luck on having any recourse on this:  water being pumped to 4 or 5 neighboring properties and a gas pipe feeding the little restaurant next door.  How to discover this before buying?  Home inspectors aren't allowed to break up walls/floors etc.:huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Study the topography via google earth and in person.  I wouldn't buy a property on or next to an arroyo.   Flooding and security issues with arroyos.  Look for issues with the neighbor's homes, best to talk with a few first.   Leaking septic, barking dogs, party house etc.   If you want quiet, distance from church is important.   Look for termite tunnels and poor drainage.   Ensure frac fees are up to date.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Notarios come in at the end and prepare docs last minute so when they come you have already tendered a deposit.

Some more pertinent questions are:

1) How did you acquire the property?

2) Did any seller get married or divorced since acquiring the property?

3) Have there ever been any liens on the property?

4) Was the property EVER ejido land?

5) Has the property even been the subject of litigation?

6) Does the seller have the original deed to the property?

7) Is the seller or other co owner appearing at the closing with a power of attorney?

8) Has any business ever operated on the property?

9) Have all HOA fees

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Al Berca said:

Unless you get your questions answered in writing and signed and witnessed any answers to your questions are meaningless and have no legal status. You must assume full responsibility for verifying the veracity of the answers you are given. There are no consumer laws in Mexico to help you as a homebuyer. There isn't even any licensing or mandatory training and education for real estate agents here.

This is truly a different world and you have full responsibility for protecting yourself.

Yes. I aware of this.  That is why I am asking for suggestions on what to ask for myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah but as Al says, you're playing with a stacked deck. They don't have to answer your questions honestly and there is nothing you can do about it. Brad Grieve has been around for years and I bet he has become pretty good at spotting problems.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, El Cartero said:

I have always hired Brad Grieve to do a home inspection on property I've purchased. 

I would absolutely have a reputable inspector.  Our "trustworthy" realtor  was doing us a favor and got some Mexican to do it. We were sooo new to this and trusted her. She read it in Spanish saying this or that was ok.  The "inspector " never went up to the roof. Too many things to enumerate. but $$$$$ could have been saved.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, El Cartero said:

I have always hired Brad Grieve to do a home inspection on property I've purchased. 

Another alternative is Eduardo Quinones of Bradport Property Inspection who have offices in Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta.

We have been extremely satisfied with their services.

(33) 3620 2015

(33) 3100 4050

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Research and get your own inspector.  We used the inspector our buyer's realtor recommended thinking he was acting in our interests simply because he was our realtor.  But after moving in and finding multiple problems that the inspector "missed",  it's clear to us now that the inspector just wanted to make sure the sale closed, of course, to the benefit of the realtor.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a couple of "inspectors", and that is not the way they work. They have nothing to gain by fudging a report just to see a sale closed... reputation is everything. I will say "consider the source".

But as an agent, you can't fluff it off. Lots of buyers insist on that report.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no such a thing as an inspector here. Some people do the inspection and I know for a fact a place that had termites that were  never caught by one of the popular inspector.. The only thing that is 100% sure is that you will not find all the tings that are wrong with the property so check the main items and pray..

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, bmh said:

There is no such a thing as an inspector here. Some people do the inspection and I know for a fact a place that had termites that were  never caught by one of the popular inspector.. The only thing that is 100% sure is that you will not find all the tings that are wrong with the property so check the main items and pray..

I whole heartily agree.No need to waste pesos on a fee. Give them to a worthwhile charity instead where they will be beneficial.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not believe  "inspectors" fluff reports they just do not see everything... there is no training and construction and norms are different here ..and there are no legal ramifications to what the report say so you are wasting money with the reports.. The inspectors may catch a few obvious things but when you open the walls you will find a whole lot of things no one knew or could know about.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rent rent rent.  Purchasing a home there is not an investment opportunity and is unwise.  And when you have had enough of the deteriorating quality of life you will be stuck with a property you are unable to sell and recoup your investment.

Read the posts on this web board.  That says it all.  The only thing left there that is good is the weather.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, El Menudo said:

BTW if that was the last post you see from me, I have been blocked for telling it like it is.  Sometimes the truth isn't pretty.

That's your "truth".  Not necessarily everyone's.  My truth is that buying a tired old house and slowly making it into a thing of beauty which no landlord can remove me from has been very rewarding.  "Investment" can be about money, or it can be "investing" in the pleasure of daily life in one's own nest, and having made it "your way".

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, gringal said:

That's your "truth".  Not necessarily everyone's.  My truth is that buying a tired old house and slowly making it into a thing of beauty which no landlord can remove me from has been very rewarding.  "Investment" can be about money, or it can be "investing" in the pleasure of daily life in one's own nest, and having made it "your way".

I certainly understand that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, El Menudo said:

Rent rent rent.  Purchasing a home there is not an investment opportunity and is unwise.  And when you have had enough of the deteriorating quality of life you will be stuck with a property you are unable to sell and recoup your investment.

Read the posts on this web board.  That says it all.  The only thing left there that is good is the weather.

I am aware of this.  Buying a residence in which to live is not an investment.  It is an expense and a liability.  An investment is one that makes money, so unless one buys a home as a rental, it is a liability.  If anyone has read Robert Kyosaki.....he makes this very clear. 

There are, however, very good reasons for buying a home to live it.  There is much one cannot do in a rental and you are always at the whims of the landlord.  Buying is not right for everyone, nor is renting. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...