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True R.V. but you can have a leak in the gas line under the house. You won't smell it but you'll sure go through a lot of propane. That has been the case in two of the houses that I've lived in here at Lakeside. It's a hazard of living in a tremor prone region. In both cases, the lines had to be rerun up and over the house. It's not expensive to do but it is an aggravation.

@ the OP, I hope you find what you're looking for.

 

 

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Good poing, Ferret.  However, an electronic “sniffer“ may also be rather ineffective in finding a small underground leak.  That said, if a leak is found by any method, in accessible lines, it can be fixed easily.  If there is still a hidden leak, in the walls or underground, it is definitely easier and more economical to run new lines above ground from the tank to the closest possible location for the stove, heater, BBQ, etc.  Our bulk tank was on the roof, near the street, and all of the gas and other plumbing, TV cable, etc. were on the roof and easy to get to.  Tht made for very short drops into the interior to service the stove or other appliances, or into a patio for BBQ or water heater, etc.

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Do RVs soap test on ALL visible joints, any crinks in the line if copper and all around the gas regulator at the gas tank, hot water tank, dryer and bbq. I might at the point, finding no leaks, would forgo the $50 to $60 estimate cost of buying the tester and use that towards replacing the entire gas line from the tank to the house. Note! Seldom ever will there be a leak in a iron pipe. Chances are almost 100% you have a copper gas line out side. 

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Could you please explain your statement "Seldom ever will there be a leak in an iron pipe".

Do you mean galvanized iron? I would like this clarified because, in both cases, the pipe that leaked was galvanized iron. In one house it was replaced with copper over the roof and in the other it was replaced with galvanized iron over the roof.

It is my understanding that copper is more flexible than galvanized iron and, therefore, able to withstand minor tremor movement.

Although, I gotta admit, when the tremor went through the house in La Huerta it didn't feel minor. The iron table with a granite top that I was sitting at jumped in the air and so did I sitting in an iron chair at it...and I ain't little.

 

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To locate a gas leak on a galvanized or black iron piping system underneath a concrete slab is a complete waste of time.  Especially considering a structure on a the soil that we have here at lakeside.  Even if you were able to accurately locate the leak and then try to repair the leak, I think you will find it near impossible to properly cut new threads on the piping for a proper repair.  Not to mention cosmetic repairs to concrete, flooring, and the possibility of destroying a structual concrete beam to access the damaged piping.  You could install a slip coupling, but then how long will that last?  In addition, the remainder of the piping system below grade is compromised due to age.  Tops is a 25 year life span of any threaded steel piping system under grade in most installations.  If you cannot locate the leakage above grade with soapy water or ether introduced into the piping system, then the best solution is to abandon the existing piping system and re-route a new piping system above grade.  Solo mi dos centavos. 

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3 hours ago, hammerhead said:

Do RVs soap test on ALL visible joints, any crinks in the line if copper and all around the gas regulator at the gas tank, hot water tank, dryer and bbq. I might at the point, finding no leaks, would forgo the $50 to $60 estimate cost of buying the tester and use that towards replacing the entire gas line from the tank to the house. Note! Seldom ever will there be a leak in a iron pipe. Chances are almost 100% you have a copper gas line out side. 

When I had a gas leak at my condo the iron pipe had rusted at one of the elbows..

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I have never seen any pulmber in Mexico with one of those detectors. The code in the USA says black iron pipe, as galvinized flakes off inside from  the gas. These flakes stop up valves and orfices. We had a very elusive leak that you could smell everywhere. Over the course of several months we had 4 plumbers and no leak location. We were loosing gas at a volumn that was costing a lot. Someone reccommended Antonio (045-331-361-6610). He said he could find the leak so I hired him. He came out and unhooked the piping/hose at the regulator on the tank. He turned off all gas using appliances. Then he hooked up an air compressor and pressurized the line with 30 lbs PSI. Remember the gas pressure is quite low 6# or less. Then he spent time listening all over the house. He watched how soon the compressor came back on. Then increased the pressure by 5 PSI. and listened agaiin. The he and I heard the leak under the livingroom floor. He was able to go through a near by bodega floor as that had a more easily replaced tile. When he dug in the very dry dust blew out of the hole. Turned out that the sticks of copper tubing had a red plastic protector on the end of the stick. This line went to a one time planned dryer hook up. He soldered a cap on the tube and repressurized it. No more recycling of the compressor, no more leaks. Try Antonio, that was 300 pesos well spent. Antonio was the only one who thought to use the air compressor.

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11 hours ago, Kiko said:

 If you cannot locate the leakage above grade with soapy water or ether introduced into the piping system, then the best solution is to abandon the existing piping system and re-route a new piping system above grade.  Solo mi dos centavos. 

That is an excellent solution, and avoids the whole ripping-up-the-floor problem. However, at least one place I know of would end up costing a fortune, simply because the tank is in front of the house, and the stove, washer and heater are all over the place inside.

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21 hours ago, Ferret said:

True R.V. but you can have a leak in the gas line under the house. You won't smell it but you'll sure go through a lot of propane. That has been the case in two of the houses that I've lived in here at Lakeside. It's a hazard of living in a tremor prone region. In both cases, the lines had to be rerun up and over the house. It's not expensive to do but it is an aggravation.

@ the OP, I hope you find what you're looking for.

 

 

"It's not expensive "...could you give some idea of cost: i.e. peso / meter and material used? Thanks...

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I did reply to you in a pm but I guess you hadn't read that yet.

The work done on the house where I am now living cost 5,000 pesos... half material and half labour. I would have preferred copper pipe but he used galvanized pipe and I didn't own the house at the time so the choice wasn't mine to make. That's running the new lines up and over the roof; coming through the roof in the bathroom for the hot water heater; blowing out and capping all the old lines. There are no leaks any where...not gas and not water and I've been living here since last June 1st.

Manuel Macias Venegas 765-3411 and 333-173-2479

BTW, I filled the 300 litre gas tank when I moved in last June 1st and it went to 85%... it's still sitting at 55%... gas water heater, gas stove, gas dryer.

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7 minutes ago, Ferret said:

I did reply to you in a pm but I guess you hadn't read that yet.

The work done on the house where I am now living cost 5,000 pesos... half material and half labour. I would have preferred copper pipe but he used galvanized pipe and I didn't own the house at the time so the choice wasn't mine to make. That's running the new lines up and over the roof; coming through the roof in the bathroom for the hot water heater; blowing out and capping all the old lines. There are no leaks any where...not gas and not water and I've been living here since last June 1st.

Manuel Macias Venegas 765-3411 and 333-173-2479

BTW, I filled the 300 litre gas tank when I moved in last June 1st and it went to 85%... it's still sitting at 55%... gas water heater, gas stove, gas dryer.

Sorry for not checking the PM first. Appreciate the detailed information and help. All the best...Thank you!

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  • 6 months later...
On 3/16/2017 at 8:41 AM, geeser said:

I have never seen any pulmber in Mexico with one of those detectors. The code in the USA says black iron pipe, as galvinized flakes off inside from  the gas. These flakes stop up valves and orfices. We had a very elusive leak that you could smell everywhere. Over the course of several months we had 4 plumbers and no leak location. We were loosing gas at a volumn that was costing a lot. Someone reccommended Antonio (045-331-361-6610). He said he could find the leak so I hired him. He came out and unhooked the piping/hose at the regulator on the tank. He turned off all gas using appliances. Then he hooked up an air compressor and pressurized the line with 30 lbs PSI. Remember the gas pressure is quite low 6# or less. Then he spent time listening all over the house. He watched how soon the compressor came back on. Then increased the pressure by 5 PSI. and listened agaiin. The he and I heard the leak under the livingroom floor. He was able to go through a near by bodega floor as that had a more easily replaced tile. When he dug in the very dry dust blew out of the hole. Turned out that the sticks of copper tubing had a red plastic protector on the end of the stick. This line went to a one time planned dryer hook up. He soldered a cap on the tube and repressurized it. No more recycling of the compressor, no more leaks. Try Antonio, that was 300 pesos well spent. Antonio was the only one who thought to use the air compressor.

Haven't had any luck contacting Antonio 045-331-361-6610...anyone have a means of doing so. If not any recommendations for someone to lay some gas lines would be appreciated. Would also like to know if anyone has had someone with experience applying Durman gas line? This should prevent any future leaks due to pipe failure.

 

 

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Yes, I redid my gas lines with a product similar to what you have pictured above.  I was able to buy the pipe by the meter, compression couplings and the reaming tool from an excellent gas supply store on Girabaldi in Sta. Teresita (Guadalajara).  It is directly kitty corner across the intersection from Karnes Girabaldi Restaurant there.

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4 hours ago, jrm30655 said:

The flex lines that connect most appliances in MX are only rated for 10 years.  If you have someone out, they should all be replaced while he is there.

Cheap insurance......

 

When connecting them ensure that they do not use Teflon tape, since they are made to mate metal on metal. 

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Actually, the code in the US was black iron only because of the potential of confusing the gas and water pipes which were galvanized.  It had nothing to do with the "flakes getting into the orifices" which is an old wives tale.  There are now no restrictions on using either type of metal pipe and even some places where it is required to use galvanized pipe for gas (such as in a fireplace insert.)  There are now bans on using galvanized for water pipes and most old installations of that pipe from years ago are rusted and gone.  Some states and some countries ban the use of copper for gas because of the same confusion issues and some places require copper for gas lines.  Go figure.  You should never have a copper fitting touch directly to a galvanized pipe or fitting since oxidizing will occur quickly.  Use a brass fitting in between. Code in the US now calls for only the thicker yellow Teflon tape not the white since they have discovered that the white tape will dissolve with long term exposure to gas.  Remember that in this country, anything goes when wiring or plumbing and things usually work OK most of the time.  Alan

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12 hours ago, Alpha1 said:

Haven't had any luck contacting Antonio 045-331-361-6610...anyone have a means of doing so. If not any recommendations for someone to lay some gas lines would be appreciated. Would also like to know if anyone has had someone with experience applying Durman gas line? This should prevent any future leaks due to pipe failure.

 

 

I recently had a gas leak problem. We pressurized the system then soaped all the visible joints, but  no leaks. Bad news, the leak was internal .The thought of diging up tile etc was bad news

Then my plumber suggest we use Durban tubing. Run the pipeline outside on the roof then drop down to the stove,clothes dryer and water heater. It worked great. A relatively simple solution to a stressful situation 

 

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On Thursday, October 05, 2017 at 11:03 PM, lakeside7 said:

I recently had a gas leak problem. We pressurized the system then soaped all the visible joints, but  no leaks. Bad news, the leak was internal .The thought of diging up tile etc was bad news

Then my plumber suggest we use Durban tubing. Run the pipeline outside on the roof then drop down to the stove,clothes dryer and water heater. It worked great. A relatively simple solution to a stressful situation 

 

Lakeside7 please see your inbox? Questions about your answer. Thanks. 

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