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Tingting is absolutely right: EVERY one of us got taken upon our arrival in one way or another. That's why it still goes on. It is no different than being shaken down by a transito during your first m

First, if WalMart gave a rat's fanny about their customers, they could do something about aggressive car washers. It's their parking lot after all. A few years ago Soriana threw all the car washers of

What bothers me are the bitter, angry "old timers" who want everyone to feel about living here the same way they do. They always say how unsafe they feel, how Mexicans are out to screw them over, how

On 3/16/2017 at 7:05 AM, Tomas said:

The "Name" would be "SMART"....100 pesos for 10 minutes work ..get real...plus, never let these thieves touch a high quality knife...they will ruin it.

One must pay for skill and equipment,not just the immediate labour but you are right these guys have no skill so 100 pesos is not something i would spend to have my knives ruined. I have a steel in my knife drawer and that's all one needs to keep your knives sharp.

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The grinders that they use to sharpen are really for axes and machetes, tools that don't need a fine edge. Knife-sharpening is an art. Back "home", I took my kitchen knives to a German guy, skilled in the Solingen arts. This is a job that takes years to perfect. Even our Ojeda/Sayula knife guys don't come close.

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If you take the knives you bought from the Sayula knifemakers to one of the events (Feria, Chili Cookoff) where they have their wares on sale, they will do an expert sharpening job overnight and you can pick them up the next day.  Their charges are reasonable.

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1 minute ago, ComputerGuy said:

The grinders that they use to sharpen are really for axes and machetes, tools that don't need a fine edge. Knife-sharpening is an art. Back "home", I took my kitchen knives to a German guy, skilled in the Solingen arts. This is a job that takes years to perfect. Even our Ojeda/Sayula knife guys don't come close.

My German knives are superior to those made in Sayula which I have to use the steel on more before each use than my german and Japanese.I probably could shave with my Swedish filleting knives.

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It is wise to always use a steel before each use, because as you know, the edge dulls very quickly on vegetables and meats. Butchers rarely have to get their blades sharpened because they follow this practice.

Unfortunately, the Sayula guys simply run your knives over a steel when you bring them in for sharpening.

I had a five-dollar Chinese cleaver, but in Chinatown in Ottawa, all unibody steel. My Solingen guy told me it was one of the finest blades he'd ever seen. I buess in China, you want a blade, you get a blade... none of this 50-choices-at-WalMart and you take your chances crap.

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Ask you local hairdresser who sharpeners their scissors.  There is a guy who comes in once a week where I go and everybody seems happy.

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I usually sharpen my own knives (1968 Sabatier carbon steel), but once every 5 years or so I have it done professionally.  I take the knives to my butcher, who loans me one of his and sends mine off to HIS guy who sharpens--not one of those machete sharpener guys from the street!  They come back like razors.  It might be just about time to do it again.  Then all I need to use to keep them honed is the steel.

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There are some good-quality and inexpensive stone and steel knife sharpeners for kitchen use, from reputable companies. Haven't seen any for purchase around here, but definitely online. They all remove a bit of steel, just like the best-trained knife experts, so that is not a worry. The best ones have two strengths: sharpen and finesse.

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I have some carbon-steel European knives that I have had since 1959, and keep them sharp with only a two-sided “Arkansas Stone“ purchased in the same year.  Both are worth having.

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