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Local Immigration Office Statistics for Chapala and Death records


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I am working on gathering statistical information and made a request to immigration to get information on how many total immigration files they work on per year at the local Chapala office and of that number how many are for Americans, here are the results:

Year / Total / Americans
2012 / 5,634 / 3,498 (62.1%)
2013 / 5,147 / 3,214 (62.4%)
2014 / 2,775 / 1,779 (64.1%)
2015 / 2,428 / 1,631 (67.2%)
2016 / 2,250 / 1,534 (68.2%)

2016 Resident Data (Cards issued in all Jalisco, not just Chapala)
Residentes Temporales: 7,962
Residentes Permanentes: 2,897

Also have been gathering death information, not all local municipalities are in but here are the stats for American and Canadian deaths annually in the municipality of Chapala

Deaths
Year / Americans / Canadians / Other foreigner
2010 / 48 / 7 / 2
2011 / 66 / 16 / 4
2012 / 65 / 17 / 4
2013 / 68 / 22 / 6
2014 / 71 / 19 / 7
2015 / 64 / 18 / 6
2016 / 84 / 30 / 8
 
In other foreigners mentioned for Chapala, England comes in first place with at least one citizen dying each year and Germany with one death annually except 2010 and 2011
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Because one can only age for so long.  Things get really tough between 75 and 100 and you know the rest of the story.  New arrivals are not sufficient to replace those who have died.  Maybe the 2012 changes and financial requirements for visas have something to do with it.  I am pretty certain that they do.  Had they existed when we moved to Mexico in 2001, we would never have been able to qualify and would not have purchased a home (twice) or had the resources or willingness to make a border run every 180 days.  Fortunately, we were “grandfathered“ all the way to permanente. That doesn‘t happen any more.

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Ill add data from Jocotepec and Ixtlahuacan when it comes in.

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Be careful drawing conclusions with 'statistics' like these withou knowing exactly what they might mean. For example if one applies for a Permanente visa in one year, they no longer have to interface with the Chapala office... right?  So maybe the high number of 'interfaces' in 2012 & 2013 included a lot of Permanentes and they no longer will be counted in  2014, 2015 and 2016.... thus (maybe) a lower overall count 'now' meaning.... nothing. Maybe. You never can tell unless you know ALL the facts. 

But one thing can probably be counted on.... more foreigners DID die in 2016. Too bad.

 

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Before you could go permanente without showing financials many folks just were happy with temporal 

1 minute ago, RickS said:

Be careful drawing conclusions with 'statistics' like these withou knowing exactly what they might mean. For example if one applies for a Permanente visa in one year, they no longer have to interface with the Chapala office... right?  So maybe the high number of 'interfaces' in 2012 & 2013 included a lot of Permanentes and they no longer will be counted in  2014, 2015 and 2016.... thus (maybe) a lower overall count 'now' meaning.... nothing. Maybe. You never can tell unless you know ALL the facts. 

But one thing can probably be counted on.... more foreigners DID die in 2016. Too bad.

 

Thanks RS, I was in the process of writing a very similar comment.

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Gracias Spencer. The laws changed Nov. 9, 2012 and interesting to see the decline partly due to process changes but also I believe in true reflection in what is happening. To me the decline 2014 to 2016 is noticeable as this is some time after the new new system started. In other words, the numbers are meaningful to compare for those 3 years. 

Here in SMA, while I do not have the stats and only conversations and personal perspective by being at INM most days the numbers are higher. Many days according to INM as many as 50 applications is common. A unusually slow day is 15 applications. However a noticeable increase is associated with manufacturers such as automobile parts and assembly. We see far more Asians than before. They are working nearby in the large industrial park 7 km away that now has at least 12 large factories and growing plus also in Celaya (Honda Fit etc), Dolores Hidalgo and nearby communities. The only other INM office in the state is in Leon.

This past December and January has been noticeably slower than normal while personally I processed over 300 last year.

Again, thanks Spencer.

Sonia

 

 

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9 hours ago, Al Berca said:

The numbers appear to confirm that about two thirds of the foreign resident population here are Americans and the remaining one third are from a variety of other countries. Interesting facts. Thank you, Spencer.

 

3 hours ago, Sonia said:

Gracias Spencer. The laws changed Nov. 9, 2012 and interesting to see the decline partly due to process changes but also I believe in true reflection in what is happening. To me the decline 2014 to 2016 is noticeable as this is some time after the new new system started. In other words, the numbers are meaningful to compare for those 3 years. 

Here in SMA, while I do not have the stats and only conversations and personal perspective by being at INM most days the numbers are higher. Many days according to INM as many as 50 applications is common. A unusually slow day is 15 applications. However a noticeable increase is associated with manufacturers such as automobile parts and assembly. We see far more Asians than before. They are working nearby in the large industrial park 7 km away that now has at least 12 large factories and growing plus also in Celaya (Honda Fit etc), Dolores Hidalgo and nearby communities. The only other INM office in the state is in Leon.

This past December and January has been noticeably slower than normal while personally I processed over 300 last year.

Again, thanks Spencer.

Sonia

 

 

I've heard that there are actually more Canadians here but for less than 6 months so they don't lose there medical benefits - and thus are not counted as permanent. Americans keep their benefits forever no matter for how long or where they live 

 

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If you are referring to Medicare then yes but of course you must return to the USA for any treatment. And you must continue to pay monthly for Part B or you will only have coverage for hospital stays.

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