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New 2017 Immigration Information and Numbers


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58 minutes ago, Sonia said:

The person quoted Canadian dollars for a Canadian at a MX consulate in Canada.

And on my web site: The amounts are per person but some consulates will accept lower financials for a spouse. Consulates vary and may use different amounts taking into account exchange rates but many will not. What I post here are the laws issued by Mexican Immigration. Consulates are not a part of Immigration. There will be variables at consulates and not total consistent. Some consulates want originals. I recommend you review your MX consulate web site. I am not responsible for those variables and the mood, knowledge, politics or skills of the person at the consulate.

PS Las Vegas is not an Embassy but rather a consulate. Consulates are not part of Inmigracion and do not always follow the law. The amounts based on multiples of minimum wage and I clearly state income, investments and home ownership based on processing thousands of visas. 

yes they are per person and can either be bank deposits in the amounts stated or pension/income as provided in te links above I wouldn't expect the consulate to be that different from the INM website where it mentions nothing about requirements which is very strange but says in the notes to consult with my consular office which I have. Unless you have the   URL for the Immigration Department in Mexico that shows what the requirements are.  I sure cant find it. This is what I found. No offense but your website is not an official website for the immigration dept and the immigration dept website says basically nothing unless you can direct me to the site that you get your information from.

https://www.gob.mx/tramites/ficha/visa-de-residencia-permanente/SRE236   

Notes:

It is necessary that you consult with the Consular Office of Mexico of your preference the options that you have to prove the economic solvency and your legal stay (in the corresponding cases).

 

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10 hours ago, michael2595 said:

yes they are per person and can either be bank deposits in the amounts stated or pension/income as provided in te links above I wouldn't expect the consulate to be that different from the INM website where it mentions nothing about requirements which is very strange but says in the notes to consult with my consular office which I have. Unless you have the   URL for the Immigration Department in Mexico that shows what the requirements are.  I sure cant find it. This is what I found. No offense but your website is not an official website for the immigration dept and the immigration dept website says basically nothing unless you can direct me to the site that you get your information from.

https://www.gob.mx/tramites/ficha/visa-de-residencia-permanente/SRE236   

Notes:

It is necessary that you consult with the Consular Office of Mexico of your preference the options that you have to prove the economic solvency and your legal stay (in the corresponding cases).

 

The SEGOB INM website might not have the financial solvency numbers for Residente Temporal and Residente Permanente but the 2011 Ley de Migración [2011 Immigration Law] certainly does and I have read it several times.

Here are the updated financial solvency requirements:

http://www.chapalalaw.com/immigration-2/

All Mexican Embassies and Mexican Consulates Worldwide should be using these numbers.

 

 

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7 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

I wouldn't be disagreeing with Sonia without a lot of research... which she has obviously done over the years, and dealt with in person.

I am not disagreeing and have researched this more than for my master's degree. I am just scratching my head. Consulates give the required information as to what is needed and all their websites say the same thing and update money requirements as per the peso fluctuation. But apparently according to her post each consulate could be different in their requirements. Consulates are not part of Immigration and do not always follow the law. but it's up to the main Immigration office In Mexico to make the final decision but the main Immigration office in Mexico says in the link I provided that It is necessary that you consult with the Consulate of your preference the options that you have to prove the economic solvency and your legal stay and bring the documentation. And I thought the motor vehicle dept in my state was bad. I rather have pins put in my eyes than to go through this craziness. 

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1 hour ago, michael2595 said:

I am not disagreeing and have researched this more than for my master's degree., just scratching my head. Consulates give the required information as to what is needed and all their websites say the same thing and update money requirements as per the peso fluctuation. But apparently according to her post each consulate could be different in their requirements but its up to the main Immigration office In Mexico to make the final decision but  main Immigration office in Mexico says in the link I provided that It is necessary that you consult with the Consulate of your preference the options that you have to prove the economic solvency and your legal stay and bring the documentation.. And I thought the motor vehicle dept in my state was bad. I rather have pins put in my eyes than to go through this craziness. 

The cauldron [your cauldron not others hopefully] is that once a person is approved at a Mexican Embassy or Mx. Consulate they are given a 6 month pre-approval for either a Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente visa in their passport. This is non negotiable once you enter Mexico legally by getting this visa stamped when entering Mexico and request a 30 day "canje" FMM card. In otherwords the Mexican Embassy or Mx. Consulate has completed step 1 in the processing of you immigrating to Mexico. The local INM office only is responsible to process step 2. The local INM office does not question the Mexican Embassy´s or Mx. Consulate´s requirements to recieve the visa in your passport. They only process the visa and when in Mexico swap [exchange] the "canje" FMM card [your now legal immigration document to be in Mexico legally] to the status you are already pre-approved for outside Mexico for the actual RT or RP visa/card. As long as you follow the rules this is how it works.

As far as you not following the discussion on how Mexican government Institutes actually sometimes do things as compared to what you are used to there is a fairly long learning curve involved but once you settle in you will eventually understand what we are talking about from first hand experience and experiences of those whom you get to know down here.

Notice in my previous post I used the word "should" [follow the rules] and not "will". Mexican government institutes and their employees seem to like a little autonomy at times.

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Alan has covered it very well.  I think newcomers to the process should seriously consider hiring an assistant/expediter to help with the completion of this process.  It really is money well spent.

Very important to initiate the second phase of the process immediately upon arrival at your destination in Mexico.  That also argues for getting expert help.  You will be amazed at how cheap that is when compared to similar services NOB.

If you think this process is bad, you should ask a Mexican with a U.S. Visa what they have to go through.  They are almost treated like criminals by the consulate here.  They get to pay a fat fee with no inkling of approval and no refund if denied even for the most arbitrary and capricious of reasons.

Thanks Alan for a well written summary!

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2 hours ago, AlanMexicali said:

 

The SEGOB INM website might not have the financial solvency numbers for Residente Temporal and Residente Permanente but the 2011 Ley de Migración [2011 Immigration Law] certainly does and I have read it several times.

Here are the updated financial solvency requirements:

http://www.chapalalaw.com/immigration-2/

All Mexican Embassies and Mexican Consulates Worldwide should be using these numbers.

 

 

The financials ARE on the gob.mx webpage, just on a different page from the one linked above. By going to the canje link from the trámites page (which is the logical sequence Alan shows above), one can see the fee options depending on the type of immigration status one chooses.

https://www.gob.mx/tramites/ficha/expedicion-de-documento-migratorio-por-canje/INM811

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Thanks all for your support. What Alan posted is correct. The chapala law article uses a very high exchange rate. Consulates do not change the amounts as exchange rates change daily. Michael I did quote the law and it is in multiples of the minimum wage for savings, income and home value.

Consulates are not consistent and their web sites do not all have same information and some have none when it comes to visa requirements. A few consulates even ask for a police report (wish they all did) but that is not a part of the law. Some consulates do not mention home ownership in Mexico and also state income other than pensions for a Permanent Resident visa is acceptable and that source of income clearly is not. 

 

Boston

VISA DE RESIDENTE TEMPORAL (MAS DE 180 DIAS Y MENOS DE 4 AÑOS) 

  • Solicitud de visa (click aquí para descargar)
  • Pasaporte vigente y una fotocopia de la página principal del mismo
  • Una fotografía tamaño pasaporte de frente, sin anteojos y con fondo blanco
  • Solo si el solicitante NO es de nacionalidad estadounidense deberá presentar original y copia del documento que acredite su estancia legal en los Estados Unidos (I-797, I-20, advance parole, etc.)
  • $36.00 dólares en efectivo o Money Order.
  • Cumplir con por lo menos uno de los siguientes requisitos:

 

a) Original y copia de los documentos que demuestren que el solicitante cuenta con un empleo o pensión que genera ingresos mínimos de $1,600.00 USD libres de impuestos por los últimos 6 meses. Este requisito puede cubrirse mediante una carta de su banco donde se establezca que usted ha recibido una pensión o un deposito bancario mensual de $1,600.00 USD por los últimos 6 meses.

B) Original y copia de comprobante de inversiones o cuentas bancarias durante los últimos 12meses que cuenten con un saldo mínimo de $26,000.00 USD libres de impuestos

c) Si usted se encuentra casado con una persona de nacionalidad mexicana, presentar original y copia del acta de matrimonio y el acta de nacimiento o pasaporte de su cónyuge mexicano.

 

RESIDENTE PERMANENTE 

  • Solicitud de visa (click aquí para descargar)
  • Pasaporte vigente y una fotocopia de la página principal del mismo
  • Una fotografía tamaño pasaporte de frente, sin anteojos y con fondo blanco
  • Solo si el solicitante NO es de nacionalidad estadounidense deberá presentar original y copia del documento que acredite su estancia legal en los Estados Unidos (I-797, I-20, advance parole, etc.)
  • $36.00 dólares en efectivo o Money Order.
  • Cumplir con por lo menos uno de los siguientes requisitos:

 

a) Original y copia de los documentos que demuestren que el solicitante cuenta con un empleo o pensión que genera ingresos mínimos de $2,600.00 USD libres de impuestos por los últimos 6meses. Este requisito puede cubrirse mediante una carta de su banco donde se establezca que usted ha recibido una pensión o un deposito bancario mensual constante de $2,600.00 USD por los últimos 6 meses.

B) Original y copia de comprobante de inversiones o cuentas bancarias durante los últimos 12meses que cuenten con un saldo mínimo de $106,000.00 USD libres de impuestos

c) Si es dueño de una propiedad en México, presentar original y copia de la escritura de propiedad a nombre del solicitante. La propiedad debe tener un valor mayor a los 207,000 USD

d) Si usted cuenta con un hijo(a) de nacionalidad mexicana, presentar original y copia de su acta de nacimiento.

 
Meanwhile MX consulate in NY has no numbers for TR and lower numbers for PR. The TR requirements are for a person sponsored by an employer and is wrong.

And Austin very different again: https://consulmex2.sre.gob.mx/austin/index.php/nonmexicans/visas

 

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17 hours ago, Ajijic_hiker said:

To michael2595....You always have the option to just skip all the TEMPORAL and PERMANENTE stuff and remain on the TOURIST VISA...it's good for 180 days. 

You can drive to the border, or fly, do some shopping, then turn around and cross the border for another 6 months,  You don't need to put pins in your eyes!

That's what I plan to do....:)

I have already figured it all out.  Have spoken again to my consulate NOB and the woman is very accommodating especially when I just told her yesterday that I have an attorney who works with the consulate every day on different matters who will advise me and work on my behalf. I am smart enough to know that when in doubt call in an expert. Have done that in business all my life. Thought this would be easy, but am a quick study.  Someone was already contacted in the immigration office here in Mexico City with regard to the nebulous information and was given the info needed and will be using the services of Spencer who I have already spoken to and I like very much. I will get the visas I need for my wife and I. It is and will be in the hands of professionals now.  Everything is good and it will stay that way. Too much time spent on this. I learned many years ago that Hope is not a strategy. On to the next issue. Flow chart done. Thank you kindly for your response. Much appreciated.

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Question:  My spouse has Permanente.  I was under the impression that the only if I want to apply within Mexico, I can only apply for Temporal.  What I want is Permanente.  Can I get that through his residency from here?

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1 hour ago, Zeb said:

Question:  My spouse has Permanente.  I was under the impression that the only if I want to apply within Mexico, I can only apply for Temporal.  What I want is Permanente.  Can I get that through his residency from here?

No. You need to be on a 2 year RT first and then apply for a RP under the "vinculo familiar" law. To get a RP now you must go to a Mexican Consulate and show proof of deposits for 6 monhs sometimes a year into an account or a large investment account with the minimum balance required for financial solvency for a RP.

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12 hours ago, Zeb said:

Question:  My spouse has Permanente.  I was under the impression that the only if I want to apply within Mexico, I can only apply for Temporal.  What I want is Permanente.  Can I get that through his residency from here?

Assuming spouse has a current FMM, under family spouse obtains a TR for 1 year, renew for 1 more year and then PR. You need marriage license apostille if married in US and then translated by a certified translator which Spencer can arrange. Some INM offices insist name on passports and marriage license be identical. Spencer may have a solution if not. Here in SMA exact matching names is a must.

All is done locally and no financials. Little advantage is being a PR and to do so means a trip to border. But it is still dramatically easier than say a Mexican or Canadian trying to live legally in the US. 

 

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  • 5 months later...

... just went through this process. A few points to consider for Canadians applying residente temporal through the Vancouver Consulate.

1. You need a monthly pension or  income of at least $1,659. The filled out downloaded application form, your 6 months worth of bank statements, and passport good for at least 6 months or preferably more.  Only pension or employment income is acceptable, investment income such as royalties are not acceptable, or as mentioned in an earlier post fixed investment assets. I used the pension income.  

2. Your  bank statement documents MUST be original from the bank, not downloaded copies and must be signed off by any bank official who says they matter. Lots of official looking bank stamps help. They must include the current months statement. No fudging this requirement. You need 1 copy of each statement, and a copy of your passport information page.  You need a 1 line letter from said bank poo-bah attesting to the validity of the documents, more bank stamps required.

3. Phone 'Connie' at the Consulate first, ask for her and she will pencil in an appointment for you, give you the 'heads up' on requirements; she is very nice, very professional and speaks perfect English.

4. Bring the CA $53 mas o menos consulate fee in small bills, cash only, they probably won't have change.

5. Go to London Drugs and get the small Mexican Visa pictures done, be sure they know the purpose of the pictures as they are NOT passport size... they have the correct software for the visa size. Costco doesn't.

6.  You will get your picture taken at the consulate, you will also be taken into the consul general's or his assistant's office for a short interview.. nice young guy,  he'll just ask you about your relationship with Mexico, about where you live or want to live, and why you want residente status.  He will sign off on your application and give it back to Connie. A word about the interview. If you have a Spanish speaking partner, as I have, bring them in too. The consul chatted, or better BS'd with my partner for 20 minutes, he just wants to know about you, your world and who you are, this really helps in creating a less formal feeling atmosphere.  

7.   You will leave with a formal visa sheen good for 6 months glued into your passport.  Make sure your passport is good for a while, you don't want it expiring during this process. 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Hi,

 

I updated the figures for 2018

 

http://www.chapalalaw.com/immigration-2/

VISA REQUIREMENTS AT MEXICAN CONSULATES OUTSIDE MEXICO:
To qualify for the temporary visa they must show a monthly income of 300 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 26,508 pesos or $1,369 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 5,000 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 80.36 pesos) or 441,800 pesos or $22,808 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements.

To qualify for the permanent visa they must show a monthly income of 500 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 44,180 pesos or $2,281 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 20,000 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 1,767,200 pesos or $91,233 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. It has been reported to us that in the past there was no minimum age limit on people applying for permanent visas but now many have reported that consulates are asking to see pension or retirement income in order to apply for the permanent visa or they are not giving them to people who are under 50 or 60 years old if at all. Shop around as consulates have different internal guidelines and if you are in this situation it pays to make some calls.

You can apply for visas for your spouse (gay couples included) and children at the consulate at the same time or we can do it when you are here in Mexico once the primary applicant has their visa. Remember that in order to do this we will need birth / marriage certificates and apostilles (legalized copies for those from Canada or non Hague Convention countries).

Please be advised that the consulates might have their own special rules. Processing time varies from a few hours to a few days on average. We can consult with you prior to your trip to the consulate and then prepare you for finishing the process here in Mexico as well as advise you how to properly fill out the FMM form upon arrival so that there will be no processing delays. Clients have reported that the consulates in Laredo, Texas and Phoenix, Arizona are some of the easier ones to deal with some only requires US$1,000 per month to get temporary. While the law says you must give 6 or 12 months bank statements, many consulates only ask for 3 to 6 months. Laredo requires an appointment be made online prior to going, we can help you make your appointment and go over documentation requirements so you do not have to make two trips.

We can make your appointment for your visa at the following consulates for a small fee:

United States
Laredo, Texas; Phoenix, Arizona; Denver, Colorado

South America
Quito, Ecuador; Bogota, Colombia,

Europe
London, England; Paris, France; Madrid, Spain; Barcelona, Spain; Rome, Italy; Milan, Italy

Asia
Beijing, China; Hong Kong, China; Tokyo, Japan; New Delhi, India

VISA REQUIREMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IMMIGRATION INSTITUTE INSIDE MEXICO:
To qualify for the temporary visa they must show a monthly income of 400 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 35,344 pesos or $1,825 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 20,000 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 1,767,200 pesos or $91,233 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. This is most commonly applied to those who renew late and have to prove income again.

To qualify for the permanent visa they must show a monthly income of 500 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 44,180 pesos or $2,281 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 25,000 times the minimum wage (for 2018 it is 88.36 pesos) or 2,209,000 pesos or $114,042 US dollars using an exchange rate of 19.37 to 1 (using January 3, 2018 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. Immigration has been applying a rule the past few years that in order to change from temporary to a permanent visa that you must show that you receive a pension or retirement income, even $1.00. This has effectively stopped many people from “jumping ahead” if they only have savings and do not receive any pension or retirement income, in these cases people must complete all 4 years as a temporary before going to permanent if for only financial reasons (not family related).

You can apply for visas for your spouse (gay couples included) and children at the consulate at the same time or we can do it when you are here in Mexico once the primary applicant has their visa. Remember that in order to do this we will need birth / marriage certificates and apostilles (legalized copies for those from Canada or non Hague Convention countries).

*2016 Note – Immigration has changed their position during the past year and now will deny renewals for temporary visas for people who entered Mexico with permission to work for a company and then change to be self employed. They are alleging that the same entry conditions do not exist. We feel this is a violation of the 5th Article of the Mexican Constitution as well as Human Rights so please plan accordingly if you are inside Mexico and wish to switch jobs.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi, Spencer. Maybe we can utilize your services to make this process easier?

I came in as an RT 2 months ago, with my own assets (stocks) and driving my US-plated vehicle with my two pets and personal possessions. My intention is not to keep the US-plated car, it was just to get the pets down here, cheaper than flying them. In the meantime, my husband is still in the US and going to Orlando for his RP this week, and will be using bank statements to fulfill his financial requirements. Then he will join me here in Mexico on March 1. 

We already bought a home in Mexico and that is where I am writing from.

Once my husband is here in our house in Mexico and has gone to INM for the RP, I am going to drive the US-plated car back to Texas to sell it, then return back here to Mexico.

Question: what would be the easiest way for me to change my status from RT to RP, before my RT expires?  As I mentioned, I own the home here in Mexico, and I have assets (stocks) but due to market fluctuation the stocks may not fill the RP  requirements. We also have a joint savings account that would meet the RP requirement, but wouldn't this mean my husband would have to accompany me back to the US to visit the consulate with me again in person, show the marriage certificate (instead of the bother of getting it apostilled)? 

As I write this I am thinking that may be the easiest thing to do, when I eventually drive the US vehicle back to the US to sell it, just take husband with me to the Laredo consulate and then I apply for RP....and he will already be RP.

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, kimanjome said:

Hi, Spencer. Maybe we can utilize your services to make this process easier?

I came in as an RT 2 months ago, with my own assets (stocks) and driving my US-plated vehicle with my two pets and personal possessions. My intention is not to keep the US-plated car, it was just to get the pets down here, cheaper than flying them. In the meantime, my husband is still in the US and going to Orlando for his RP this week, and will be using bank statements to fulfill his financial requirements. Then he will join me here in Mexico on March 1. 

We already bought a home in Mexico and that is where I am writing from.

Once my husband is here in our house in Mexico and has gone to INM for the RP, I am going to drive the US-plated car back to Texas to sell it, then return back here to Mexico.

Question: what would be the easiest way for me to change my status from RT to RP, before my RT expires?  As I mentioned, I own the home here in Mexico, and I have assets (stocks) but due to market fluctuation the stocks may not fill the RP  requirements. We also have a joint savings account that would meet the RP requirement, but wouldn't this mean my husband would have to accompany me back to the US to visit the consulate with me again in person, show the marriage certificate (instead of the bother of getting it apostilled)? 

As I write this I am thinking that may be the easiest thing to do, when I eventually drive the US vehicle back to the US to sell it, just take husband with me to the Laredo consulate and then I apply for RP....and he will already be RP.

 

 

 

Keep your TR status and keep your car. There is almost no advantage in becoming a PR now even if you could. FYI Orlando staff have bene known to poorly informed but hopefully all goes well.

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  • 1 month later...
52 minutes ago, AngusMactavish said:

Bank statements, not tax returns. You were smoked.

If she is qualifying based on income, not financial assets, she does need to bring proof of income.  Not income tax returns, but whatever proves her income such as SS statement of benefits.  In my case I had to bring a statement from my ex-employer stating my monthly income and that the pension was for life.

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4 hours ago, annabell1952 said:

Someone told me for temp visa I had to show 2 years of income taxes.  I am sure there are some that don't even file anymore after a certain age. I just want to know if this is true or not

http://www.soniadiaz.mx/immigration---visas.html

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On 6/13/2017 at 9:09 PM, michael2595 said:

yes they are per person and can either be bank deposits in the amounts stated or pension/income as provided in te links above I wouldn't expect the consulate to be that different from the INM website where it mentions nothing about requirements which is very strange but says in the notes to consult with my consular office which I have. Unless you have the   URL for the Immigration Department in Mexico that shows what the requirements are.  I sure cant find it. This is what I found. No offense but your website is not an official website for the immigration dept and the immigration dept website says basically nothing unless you can direct me to the site that you get your information from.

https://www.gob.mx/tramites/ficha/visa-de-residencia-permanente/SRE236   

Notes:

It is necessary that you consult with the Consular Office of Mexico of your preference the options that you have to prove the economic solvency and your legal stay (in the corresponding cases).

 


Note that the Mexican Consulates are part of the   Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE)   and are governed by the  Ley de la SRE  and the  Reglamentos de la SRE.

The 'INM'   Instituto Nacional de Migración   is a part of  SEGOB  'La Secretaría de Gobernación'   and is governed by the  Ley de Migración  and Reglamentos de Migración".

For these reasons,   the INM websites   do not list the  Consulates fees   nor do they list the Consulates policies & requirements:   Different departments & different laws.

If you don't like Sonia's free offerings,  then go to the D.O.F. and read the  Ley de la SRE  and the  Reglamentos de la SRE    for yourself.   
or   
Read Spencer's good posts above & read his website for accurate details on these things.

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 Sonia, 

The Orlando Consulate told me to bring a statement from my pension source that stated the current monthly amount and that it was permanent.  That was in addition to the bank statements showing those deposits.  It wasn't a big deal...my benefits person scanned and emailed me a standard form (they said they get requests for this all the time from mortgage companies and banks).  This was in January 2017 for an RP.  

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