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I have found the food at Avocado Club to be delicious and they have some different dishes than most restaurants around here.  But, there are two things to think about.  One, there is a long flight of stairs, so if any in your group has any mobility problems, that could be an issue.  Two, make sure you dress in layers, because it can get quite windy up there, and in January, will probably be chilly.

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Absolutely one of our favorites. We eat there at least once a week.

Valid point about the stairs but they have good handrails and the staff will help anyone with mobility issues. 

It can be a little cool but they have a number of really effective heaters and have some "curtains" that help with the breeze.

As NanaG mentioned they have some very interesting menu items, great service and it is an overall terrific experience. They are experienced at dealing with groups of your size - or larger.

Go by and talk to Juan - the manager. He will take good care of you. Enjoy!!!

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They actually measure the wine - as well as all other alcoholic drinks. They use large glasses so I guess it it could look "short". Maybe I'll suggest to Juan that they use smaller glasses so it will look like more wine - LOL.

And they have mosquito spray. Lucky for me the mosquitoes love my wife but mostly leave me alone. I keep trying to attract the mosquitoes so they will leave her alone but so far no luck.

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Great staff, great chef and menu with specials and they have Indio and Tecate on tap!!! Great margaritas too. Juan, the manager, and Rigo and Magda are very friendly and attentive. They have a couple of tower heaters and when I go, I wear a sweater and carry a sweatshirt or rebozo to cover my shoulders and/or legs if it's really chilly, but so far, for me, it's not been uncomfortable. 

 

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Sorry REC but no matter what glass you put the wine in it is a short pour.  I have heard many others having the same complaint. They should check out the pours in other local good restaurants as that is their competition . The food and service however are good

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6 hours ago, Kyle said:

Sorry REC but no matter what glass you put the wine in it is a short pour.  I have heard many others having the same complaint. They should check out the pours in other local good restaurants as that is their competition . The food and service however are good

All good restaurants will consistently give you a 5 ounce pour.  That's based on the industry standard used by sommeliers.  If you think you're getting a short pour, have them measure it.

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I should definitely stay out of this but I am not smart enough to do so. I find this pretty funny so here I go. I must be bored tonight. Let the flaming begin.

I personally can't imagine asking a restaurant to measure my wine to prove to me that they are serving some pretty arbitrary amount that I have decided is "correct:. Has anyone really done this??? Wow. Never seen that happen anywhere.

But that is a great idea so I am going to start asking restaurants to weigh my mashed potatoes, green beans and the slice of pie I order for desert.

Here is an interesting idea. Maybe someone can go around town and measure the "pour" at all the restaurants so we will have a chart. We can then determine the cost per ounce, factor in the exchange rate for various currencies, and update it frequently, After all we are talking about serious money here - typically about $3 for a glass of wine most places around town.

I have another well tested approach that has worked for me. I only order wine from restaurants in small fishing villages in Mexico where there is a credentialed sommeliers on duty. So far that strategy has been flawless. I've never been disappointed.

I am sure that many of you will not find this at all funny but I think it is pretty hilarious.

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1 hour ago, REC said:

I should definitely stay out of this but I am not smart enough to do so. I find this pretty funny so here I go. I must be bored tonight. Let the flaming begin.

I personally can't imagine asking a restaurant to measure my wine to prove to me that they are serving some pretty arbitrary amount that I have decided is "correct:. Has anyone really done this??? Wow. Never seen that happen anywhere.

But that is a great idea so I am going to start asking restaurants to weigh my mashed potatoes, green beans and the slice of pie I order for desert.

Here is an interesting idea. Maybe someone can go acaarround town and measure the "pour" at all the restaurants so we will have a chart. We can then determine the cost per ounce, factor in the exchange rate for various currencies, and update it frequently, After all we are talking about serious money here - typically about $3 for a glass of wine most places around town.

I have another well tested approach that has worked for me. I only order wine from restaurants in small fishing villages in Mexico where there is a credentialed sommeliers on duty. So far that strategy has been flawless. I've never been disappointed.

I am sure that many of you will not find this at all funny but I think it is pretty hilarious.

 

Be careful what you ask for....   :D

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14 hours ago, REC said:

I should definitely stay out of this but I am not smart enough to do so. I find this pretty funny so here I go. I must be bored tonight. Let the flaming begin.

I personally can't imagine asking a restaurant to measure my wine to prove to me that they are serving some pretty arbitrary amount that I have decided is "correct:. Has anyone really done this??? Wow. Never seen that happen anywhere.

But that is a great idea so I am going to start asking restaurants to weigh my mashed potatoes, green beans and the slice of pie I order for desert.

Here is an interesting idea. Maybe someone can go around town and measure the "pour" at all the restaurants so we will have a chart. We can then determine the cost per ounce, factor in the exchange rate for various currencies, and update it frequently, After all we are talking about serious money here - typically about $3 for a glass of wine most places around town.

I have another well tested approach that has worked for me. I only order wine from restaurants in small fishing villages in Mexico where there is a credentialed sommeliers on duty. So far that strategy has been flawless. I've never been disappointed.

I am sure that many of you will not find this at all funny but I think it is pretty hilarious.

Thank you for your 'humorous' sarcasm REC.

The reason that I mentioned about the standard pour is for the benefit of the restaurants and their bottom line.  If they consistently short-pour, they could lose customers.   And if they over-pour, they lose money on each bottle, so it's in their best interest to train their staff on how to do a correct pour.  

 

 

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Here I go again. My wife is yelling at me to stop but I am hard to train. I give her so many reasons to yell at me that I have a certain amount if statutory immunity built up. I'm convinced that she doesn't really expect me to stop but she still yells at me.

I actually have been told by the owner about the "wine pour" training at Avocado Club and Gossip (same owner). He has determined for himself the "correct pour". Amazing that he didn't need our help. In fact all of their beverages are measured and consistent.

So he has a cup that is the amount to be served and the servers follow a very detailed and extensive process:

  1. Pour wine into cup
  2. Pour contents of cup into wine glass
  3. Serve

Their wine serving training used to take 3 months and included an apprenticeship under a wine pouring expert with decades of experience in delivering $3 glasses of wine. But they now have the training down to 12 seconds. Most of that time is "here is the cup". Last time I was there I tried to hide their cup to see what they would do but they had a backup. I'll have to find another way to annoy them.

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1 hour ago, REC said:

So he has a cup that is the amount to be served and the servers follow a very detailed and extensive process:

  1. Pour wine into cup
  2. Pour contents of cup into wine glass
  3. Serve

So, they're "short-cupping"? :blink:

This tangent is ridiculous, but amusing.

Bottom line IMO: Avocado Club is a GREAT new addition to our local restaurants, with a very interesting menu, different than all the rest. (Thank you Ismat.) And Juan is probably the most capable and accommodating restaurant employee in the area. If you can't have a good experience at the Avocado Club, well then, good luck.

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3 hours ago, REC said:

Here I go again. My wife is yelling at me to stop but I am hard to train. I give her so many reasons to yell at me that I have a certain amount if statutory immunity built up. I'm convinced that she doesn't really expect me to stop but she still yells at me.

I actually have been told by the owner about the "wine pour" training at Avocado Club and Gossip (same owner). He has determined for himself the "correct pour". Amazing that he didn't need our help. In fact all of their beverages are measured and consistent.

So he has a cup that is the amount to be served and the servers follow a very detailed and extensive process:

  1. Pour wine into cup
  2. Pour contents of cup into wine glass
  3. Serve

Their wine serving training used to take 3 months and included an apprenticeship under a wine pouring expert with decades of experience in delivering $3 glasses of wine. But they now have the training down to 12 seconds. Most of that time is "here is the cup". Last time I was there I tried to hide their cup to see what they would do but they had a backup. I'll have to find another way to annoy them.

I guess you and your friends think that your sarcasm is funny, but I was making a valid point, and I don't think that it called for your snark.  I happen to have been trained by a master sommelier who has worked in many large cities (New York, Montreal, San Francisco, etc).  

The restaurants need to learn to pour correctly, or they could be losing money on each bottle of wine.  Even if you don't care, I know that they do!!

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Nana, actually REC's sarcasm IS funny -- well, to some of us anyway. We don't take ourselves too seriously and forget that others may. You are missing the point. There is something funny about a person "trained by a master sommelier who has worked in many large cities (New York, Montreal, San Francisco, etc)" trying to apply her standards to a restaurant called the Avocado Club in a former driving range on a two-lane road in the middle of Mexico. They do measure their wine and maybe your way would be better but the way they do it works for them. I understand how you feel but still the humor does not escape me. 

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I'll second Zena.  REC's sarcasm is on target and coffee-spill funny.  When we take ourselves too seriously, we're heading down a path old people are often accused of: Cranky.  If the restaurant pours wine up to the widest part of the glass, that's fine.  Higher is "generous".  Up to the brim....WHAT!  :o

I'm eager to try Avocado, but am waiting for the elevator.  I won't even mind if it's slooow.

 

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In the nine years we've been here, we've observed that the local restaurants more and more emulate those NOB using dinner beverages as a very profitable option.  Drink prices have gone up a lot faster than food prices IMO and pours have become less generous in many places.

Still, restaurants here are a screaming bargain compared to NOB.  What surprises me is that in our limited experience once can't say the same about GDL.  Please note the limited experience part.  If local or regional restaurants had to depend on business from the likes of us, they'd all starve. :D

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