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A friend of ours advocates bone soup as a beginning to actually repair cartilage. I don't claim to know the science behind this claim. There is bone soup for flavour, there is bone soup for health. The one for health contains as much cartilage containing bits as possible. And yes, this includes knuckles, spines and marrow.

http://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/common-mistakes/article/common-mistakes-bone-broth

 

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27 minutes ago, Xena said:

You don't know the science behind the claim because there is none.  

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/02/10/384948585/taking-stock-of-bone-broth-sorry-no-cure-all-here

I liked this part of your article. I also like how easy it is, just take out a frozen block of broth, throw in some fresh veggies, then some good quality noodles. What a delight - and few dishes, to clean.

Quote

"I think the real benefit of bone broth is that people are returning to the kitchen to prepare homemade, whole foods from scratch," McGruther says. "There's always benefits to cooking foods from home, and that's exactly what we're seeing with bone broth."

 

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Bone broth is easy to make and nutritious even though it does not actually repair cartilage. I have friends who make it all the time for themselves and their dogs and cats. 

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"Bone broth" has been known as (beef, chicken, fish) stock forever.  "Bone broth" is only remarkable because it is so easy and such a throwback to making our own meals.  I ALWAYS have a gallon or so of beef or chicken stock in the freezer--right now, I even have a gallon of shrimp and fish stock.

I most recently made 15-hour beef stock: roasted marrow and other beef bones, small amount of herbs, celery, carrots, a leek or an onion, and bring to a boil.  Skim stock to remove foam, turn down the heat to as low as you can get it, and simmer it (with the pot top tilted to allow steam to escape) for hours and hours.  Remember to add hot water as the stock evaporates.  Be sure not to let the pot simmer dry!  The last batch of beef broth simmered for 15 hours; the last batch of chicken broth simmered for 6 hours.  It's roasting the bones before simmering them that gives the broth the really deep flavor one wants.

Once the simmering is finished, I partially cool the broth, remove all the bones and vegetables, then chill the broth until any fat congeals on top of the liquid.  It's easy to remove the solid fat.  Then I freeze the clear broth in gallon zip-lock bags, laid flat on a cookie sheet until frozen.  Then stack the flat bags in the freezer--they take up very little space that way.

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I make chicken bone broth often. I find the best way to make bone broth is in my crock pot. I add everything and let it cook for 2 to 4 days adding water as needed The longer it cooks the more nutrients are removed from the bones. You need to add a TBS of apple cider vinegar to leach all of the minerals from the bones. I freeze in ice cube trays and use this broth for many recipes which call for chicken broth. I find the deep flavor much better than any broth I cook on the stove for hours.

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jle - where do you find chicken backs and necks? Puritan Poultry used to sell them - but they are expensive. The local fresh raised, farmyard chickens are inexpensive enough, but they seldom trim them out to just the bones and necks. Beef and pork bones are easy to get, especially neck bones, which have the most flavour. Used to buy lamb neck bones in Canada, really, really good for a curry base.

It is so cold in this drafty (draughty- Chapala.com spell check approved) old, rambling house, maybe I will make some beef tea or hot buttered rum, it is the weekend - right?

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I just save all my chicken bones in the freezer, until I have enough to make a caldo.

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14 hours ago, CHILLIN said:

jle - where do you find chicken backs and necks? Puritan Poultry used to sell them - but they are expensive. The are inexpensive enough, but they seldom trim them out to just the bones and necks. Beef and pork bones are easy to get, especially neck bones, which have the most flavour. Used to buy lamb neck bones in Canada, really, really good for a curry base.

It is so cold in this drafty (draughty- Chapala.com spell check approved) old, rambling house, maybe I will make some beef tea or hot buttered rum, it is the weekend - right?

CHILLIN, I'm curious to know where you buy "local fresh raised, farmyard chickens".  

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I think I am buying "fresh that day" chicken, from the chicken/veggie/and meat store, serving the community between the slaughterhouse and the highway, beside Soriana. They are always fairly small birds, and not loaded with fat or water. Many people "shop for the day" there, they used to say that was because many households did not have refrigerators - but I doubt that is true today. I think, that living in extended families, the older ones like to get out, socialise a bit, gossip a bit, and start the family meals which will get them through the week. Farmyards and backyards kind of spill over each other in this Colonia.

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My dogs eat chicken thighs every day. I freeze the bones and make broth when the freezer is full. I have a batch going now with a turkey carcass.

 

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On 11/27/2016 at 1:13 AM, jle said:

I make chicken bone broth often. I find the best way to make bone broth is in my crock pot. I add everything and let it cook for 2 to 4 days adding water as needed The longer you take phen375 it cooks the more nutrients are removed from the bones. You need to add a TBS of apple cider vinegar to leach all of the minerals from the bones. I freeze in ice cube trays and use this broth for many recipes which call for chicken broth. I find the deep flavor much better than any broth I cook on the stove for hours.

 
 

I have never tried making chicken broth soup in a crockpot. Your post gave me new ideas. Will try your recipe soon.

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It would seem there is a limit to the length that cooking works for broth. After 36 to 48 hours it can discolour and the taste goes off. Also, the fat can go rancid. I've never actually done a broth for more than three hours. But then, I'm looking for flavour, not nutrients specifically.

The phrase "bone soup" should be discarded... it's just one of many new trendy food mania terms that guys with farmer beards and man-buns have begun spouting as part of the silly hipster movement. As More Liana so rightfully pointed out, it's just broth.

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2 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

The phrase "bone soup" should be discarded... it's just one of many new trendy food mania terms that guys with farmer beards and man-buns have begun spouting as part of the silly hipster movement. As More Liana so rightfully pointed out, it's just broth.

To some it may be referred to as broth but to others there is a small difference in the terms broth, stock and bone broth. It is cooking time. Kind of like rare, medium, and well done.

https://www.google.com.mx/amp/s/www.epicurious.com/ingredients/difference-stock-broth-bone-broth-article/amp

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I make beef and chicken pho and also stock .. I always have some in the freezer. I buy backs from Puritan poultry when I do not have have enough chicken bones saved from the breats and thighs  or whole chicken I buy. I Buy the beef bones at Walmart. I would think they are the ones to make as there is tons of bone marrow in them.

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I make chicken stock of the bones and skin from a whole roasted chicken purchased at Walmart or Sam's. I make beef bone broth in a crock pot from bones purchased at a butcher shop.

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I usually boil a whole chicken down with onion, carrot, celery and fresh herbs from the garden (and sometimes a couple tbs. of pollo powder) for about 2 hrs. (remove the bag of gizzards and feet). Then use the meat for enchiladas, sandwiches, soup, etc. Strain off all the veggies and herbs, put the pot in a fridge over night, skim off the fat and freeze the broth for whenever.

You get all the meat this way as it peels off the bones very easily.

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On 11/26/2016 at 12:35 AM, More Liana said:

"Bone broth" has been known as (beef, chicken, fish) stock forever.  "Bone broth" is only remarkable because it is so easy and such a throwback to making our own meals.  I ALWAYS have a gallon or so of beef or chicken stock in the freezer--right now, I even have a gallon of shrimp and fish stock.

I most recently made 15-hour beef stock: roasted marrow and other beef bones, small amount of herbs, celery, carrots, a leek or an onion, and bring to a boil.  Skim stock to remove foam, turn down the heat to as low as you can get it, and simmer it (with the pot top tilted to allow steam to escape) for hours and hours.  Remember to add hot water as the stock evaporates.  Be sure not to let the pot simmer dry!  The last batch of beef broth simmered for 15 hours; the last batch of chicken broth simmered for 6 hours.  It's roasting the bones before simmering them that gives the broth the really deep flavor one wants.

Once the simmering is finished, I partially cool the broth, remove all the bones and vegetables, then chill the broth until any fat congeals on top of the liquid.  It's easy to remove the solid fat.  Then I freeze the clear broth in gallon zip-lock bags, laid flat on a cookie sheet until frozen.  Then stack the flat bags in the freezer--they take up very little space that way.

I use your method as well.  It is simple and the taste is way better than a commercial product, and healthier because you control the ingredients. I also using the same storing method.

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I have boiled whole chickens in the past, but that just leaves me with overcooked chicken. So I grille or roast the chicken, then use the bones and the back for making the stock (along with, as mentioned above, veg). The feet and gizzards go in, too, to feed the cat... or if I want really strong gravy, cooked in a frypan to use as "scrapings". In any case, I now have this new measuring cup that separates the fat from the caldo quite easily.

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On 11/27/2016 at 6:40 PM, ComputerGuy said:

I just save all my chicken bones in the freezer, until I have enough to make a caldo.

This what we do as well.  It's the easiest way to accumulate what is needed.

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