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Hi everyone

What would you recommend for battling earwings from around your house and garden and also micro mini hormigas ?

 

all of your inputs welcome

 

gracias

 

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I have had trouble in the past with the mini black ants.  Try this mixture, it has worked for me every time.  Let the mixture cool, pour into bottle caps or jam jar lids or even an empty coke can on its side and leave wherever the ants are.   It might take a couple of days, they eat it and disappear.  If it crystalizes just refill the caps.  Good luck.  Oh, the Borac Acid you can by at Hardware stores.  I store it in a jar either in the fridge or in a cupboard.

Mix one cup water with ½ cup sugar and 3 tablespoons borac acid.  Heat on stove until sugar has melted. 
 
We do not have a lot of earwigs, I just spray them.

 

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Quoting Glyn above:  "I have had trouble in the past with the mini black ants.  Try this mixture, it has worked for me every time.  Let the mixture cool, pour into bottle caps or jam jar lids or even an empty coke can on its side and leave wherever the ants are.   It might take a couple of days, they eat it and disappear.  If it crystalizes just refill the caps.  Good luck.  Oh, the Borac Acid you can by at Hardware stores.  I store it in a jar either in the fridge or in a cupboard.

Mix one cup water with ½ cup sugar and 3 tablespoons borac acid.  Heat on stove until sugar has melted.  We do not have a lot of earwigs, I just spray them."

___________________

Please be very careful with this tip.  I just tried it and the mixture removed the coating from one of my better aluminum saucepans - I had to throw it into the garbage.

 

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Arjay, perhaps your aluminum pans aren't as good as you thought. This is interesting -

Aluminum cookware

Aluminum is a soft and highly reactive metal that can leach into food, especially when you are cooking with acidic ingredients. The metal-food reaction can form aluminum salts that are associated with impaired visual motor coordination and Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum is ubiquitous — it is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in the air, water and soil. Aluminum intake is virtually impossible to avoid, and the amount we are likely to get from aluminum cookware is relatively minimal. This has led to a cookware-is-the-least-of-our-worries stance. Approached from a more precautionary view, why wouldn’t we take every opportunity to limit exposure, at least until we have reliable evidence of aluminum’s safety?

As with other cookware, the more pitted and worn the pot, the greater the amount of aluminum that can be absorbed. Because aluminum is so reactive, cooking or storing highly acidic or salty foods may cause more aluminum than usual to enter the food.

Anodized aluminum cookware

This has become a popular alternative to plain aluminum. Aluminum placed in a chemical solution and exposed to electric current builds up a hard, non-reactive surface. This process is called anodization. The electrochemical anodizing process “locks in” the aluminum, but anodization can break down over time.

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10 hours ago, WideSky said:

Arjay, perhaps your aluminum pans aren't as good as you thought. This is interesting -

Aluminum cookware

Aluminum is a soft and highly reactive metal that can leach into food, especially when you are cooking with acidic ingredients. The metal-food reaction can form aluminum salts that are associated with impaired visual motor coordination and Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum is ubiquitous — it is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in the air, water and soil. Aluminum intake is virtually impossible to avoid, and the amount we are likely to get from aluminum cookware is relatively minimal. This has led to a cookware-is-the-least-of-our-worries stance. Approached from a more precautionary view, why wouldn’t we take every opportunity to limit exposure, at least until we have reliable evidence of aluminum’s safety?

As with other cookware, the more pitted and worn the pot, the greater the amount of aluminum that can be absorbed. Because aluminum is so reactive, cooking or storing highly acidic or salty foods may cause more aluminum than usual to enter the food.

Anodized aluminum cookware

This has become a popular alternative to plain aluminum. Aluminum placed in a chemical solution and exposed to electric current builds up a hard, non-reactive surface. This process is called anodization. The electrochemical anodizing process “locks in” the aluminum, but anodization can break down over time.

This is interesting.  I thought my pot was pretty good quality, although I bought it in the Chapala tianguis a few years ago and liked it.  I need to replace the pot and don't know what kind of saucepans are available down here or where I can get one.  Has anyone had experience with buying saucepans in Walmart, for example?  I'm not looking for top of the line - just a decent pot that is hopefully safe.  Thanks.

 

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There is a relatively new store in Chapala on Madero, I think called Kucho, which sells cookware. I've never looked for pots at Walmart but they would have something decent. I had purchased a set of Lagostina heavy bottom stainless steel pots about a year before I moved here so they came with me. With gas stoves I find the heavier the bottom the heat transfers more evenly - if something does burn then a baking soda paste and scrub pad cleans them up - works on the outside too.  I did have aluminum pots when I lived in the far north but after years of use they got relegated to the camping supplies.

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Both WalMart and Soriana now have a selection of both non-stick and porcelain-lined pots, and a few of the newer TFal heavy-duty frypans. Problem with a lot of the pots is the lids have steamholes. Rarely stops boilover, and is useless for rice and many veg.

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Cast iron, if you don't want to spring for high quality stainless is the best choice for cookware IMHO. It has the added benefit of providing iron to your diet in the foods you cook in it. I have bought low quality, inexpensive stainless pots in Mexico that are okay for some things.

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