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I recently purchased a new computer with a large LED monitor. It is plugged into a new voltage regulator. The monitor shuts off at random times while the  CPU is fine and continues without  problems. I had a computer expert test the system and it runs fine without any problems whatsoever. But it will shut the monitor down every time at my house. I asked an electrician to check my outlet, etc. He said there was nothing wrong and the monitor should run without shutting down. But it does not. I am at the hair pulling stage and I am driving my computer person crazy. If any of you have experienced this problem and have suggestions I would greatly appreciate your wisdom.
 

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Isolate the problem.  First, plug it into a different voltage regulator or directly into the wall.  If the problem persists, borrow a monitor from someone and plug it into your original voltage regulator.  Then swap out the cord going from the computer to the monitor.  If the problem persists, your problem is in the video card inside your new computer.  I know, it's all new, but remember where these things are made.  In China, new does not always mean serviceable.  And if it's new (name brand?) it should have a warranty.

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I'm responsible for this system. Everything has been isolated and tested in that environment. In my office, which is nothing special other than having many PCs and monitors running at once, neither the monitor or PC show any problems after 40 hours. The last two hours, software tools have been used to put the PC under a 100% load for each of the four cores in the CPU, and the temperature and voltage throughput is steady (10 degrees C on a CPU that is rated up to 70 degrees).

Thus the request for a truly qualified electrician.

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Check the outlet in which the regulator is plugged into, is it properly grounded and polarized? A tester will determine this easily.

 

 

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I reiterate, all testing at that level has been done. Need a qualified electrician. Someone trained, who understands electricity, not just how to run wires and test for ground.

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Sorry, but my frustration is showing. What I need right now is a good, qualified electrician. There is nothing wrong with the computer. Of that, I am certain.

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Many of the monitors being sold are extremely sensitive to power line voltage fluctuations and will shut themselves down if there is a blip.  CFE has not gotten the hang of switching generators and will blip out momentarily.  My monitor plugged into wall will shut down on a blip while the cptr keeps chugging.  It's probable the regulator is not fast enough to smooth the blip.  We're talking hundredths of a second.

Most regulators especially the whole house types have electro-mechanical components that are relatively slow to respond to blips.  A cheapo UPS for the monitor, which operates purely electronically, will probably solve your problem.

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A shame that we could not find a qualified electrician. However, the problem turned out to be CFE's "blipping", which was fixed by using a good regulator and installing a large Power Supply Unit in the tower.

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On 11/14/2016 at 9:53 AM, ComputerGuy said:

The last two hours, software tools have been used to put the PC under a 100% load for each of the four cores in the CPU, and the temperature and voltage throughput is steady (10 degrees C on a CPU that is rated up to 70 degrees).

Thus the request for a truly qualified electrician.

Good luck for a electronics tech, other than Guadalajara. I think you would need a power source which outputs clean sine waves. CFE doesn't really care about this because the bulk of their revenue is industry, which doesn't mind dirty power. Here is an article about it, showing how dirty most residential power is. This refers to UPS, which provides a period of time to restore data if there is a  power outage. Most people don't need that feature, and it adds a lot to the price.

http://superuser.com/questions/912679/when-do-i-need-a-pure-sine-wave-ups

This is off topic, but I am just finishing a book "Alif the Unseen" by G. Willow Wilson, which is an excellent read, very favorably reviewed. It is especially interesting to people in the computer field, but it also includes "Jinns" or genies, and high speed chases too. In one part he has to abandon some computers. He plants a software program that overloads the CPU to combustion as soon as it is turned on (seized by the State). Is this even possible? I seem to recall there is a flash drive out there that kills computers as soon as the drive is plugged in.

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The concept of flash drives that kill PCs instantly is something I imagine is buried in the Dark Web, a place I will not tread. Based on the theory of "Juice Jacking", where the USB drives creates power surges and the like. Looks good on TV shows, though. Also, shows that portray spies inserting flash drives that immediately begin to download the files they are after is pretty hokey.

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