Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Recommended Posts

Ajijic_hiker--We must all keep in mind that the dogs being poisoned are not all strays. Poisoned meat is being placed where even a dog on a leash may come upon it and grab it even before its owner/walker can see it.

I'm wondering what system could be put in place to rid the community of stray dogs. I've been here 19 years and the problem of sick and homeless dogs was much worse. My husband and I worked early on with the Lakeside Humane Society (as I recall its name). It was dedicated to picking up strays and giving them shelter. In time, there were other welfare groups doing the same. The community was educated about the need to spay and neuter. That cut down on unwanted litters. And so on. But it's a difficult problem. These days even though there are more shelters than there were years ago, they're full.

The character(s) who is poisoning these dogs is mentally ill and evil, I'm sure. He/she needs to be tracked down, as was the last poisoner a few years back. He chose to leave town, I believe it was said he got out of Mexico. It has occurred to me that maybe he is back. If that is the case, his description must be the same, and that was known. Also possibly even his name. Maybe it would be a good idea for those of us who knew who he was to try to find out where he's living now, if he's back. (As a volunteer at the Animal Shelter at the time working with Geoffrey kaye, we were part of the group effort to track him down, many of us were involved. Hope this could come up at any meeting on the latest poisonings.) I am mostly home bound these days caring for an ill husband.

Lexy

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Lexy, spot on. My Mom would assist some years back during the volunteer spay/neuter clinics. And there are lots of people like you and her, who spend an inordinate amount of time volunteering with animals here. When you couple that with the increasing awareness among Mexicans that dogs can be pets, and not just soulless creatures, we see as you say a much different situation with far fewer strays. It's a huge improvement, and the work is ongoing.

Having an animal on a leash is only viable when it's a pet. Animal "rights" are improving in this country, for sure, as recently as new laws passed this year, but the manpower and money that would be required to manage the situation (clear a whole town of strays?) is still far better spent in areas that help the community in more substantial ways.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Those poisoned included:

-Dogs on leash (quite a few) which gobbled up a little something.

-Dogs behind walls (at least 5), where meat was thrown over or placed under the door.

including one pregnant dog, whom was owned/kept in her yard.  One door was that of 

a loose wood entry and two dogs of a Mexican family lost 2 dogs in that incident.

-Cats behind walls (again meat thrown over).

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I ran into a well-know gringo from Ajijic, with his Pomeranians off leash, this morning down by the lake.  In case he hasn't heard of the poisonings, I let him know.  He said that it is just hysteria and that very few dogs have actually been poisoned.  I told him he was in error.  He said he talked to his vet and was told not many dogs were poisoned.  I left him with the thought that I hoped his dogs didn't pay for his stupidity.  Does anyone have the latest confirmed count of poisoned dogs?

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Yo1 said:

I ran into a well-know gringo from Ajijic, with his Pomeranians off leash, this morning down by the lake.  In case he hasn't heard of the poisonings, I let him know.  He said that it is just hysteria and that very few dogs have actually been poisoned.  I told him he was in error.  He said he talked to his vet and was told not many dogs were poisoned.  I left him with the thought that I hoped his dogs didn't pay for his stupidity.  Does anyone have the latest confirmed count of poisoned dogs?

I do not have an exact count but do personally know five people who have lost their dogs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take your dogs with you, work them out, but do muzzle training.

These dogs do deserve their exercise, your companionship and their safety.

Muzzles are a necessity, as we are now aware there are mentally unstable people involved.

Mine go with me, with those safety measures in place.  

We always pick up after ourselves.

In fact, we pick up some poops left by street dogs, and litter discarded by messy people!

We carry used grocery bags with us... It's just a nice thing to do. 

Do see Harry's thread about muzzles.  They are not the heavy metal muzzles, but a very 

comfy enjoyable, pant friendly muzzle.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This person/persons doing this almost certainly have some type of mental health issues that one would have to to make innocent creatures suffer such an awful death.

Is it possible that this person is attempting to solve a problem (in their own sick way) that they feel the local government is either incapable of solving or unwilling to address? That they're sick and tired of all the stray dogs running loose?

Certainly not going about it  the right way, but is it conceivable that the poison was meant for the strays and not the dogs of the responsible and caring owners?

Not that any of them deserve to die this way. Even the most ferocious dogs are usually euthanized humanely.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Joanne please read the many posts stating that some of the dogs being poisoned are being poisoned in their own yards and while being walked on a leash.

This is not someone trying to solve ,what you consider a local problem. The street dogs have been here for years there are fewer now than when I came 10 years ago Mexicans have been letting their animals out long before you moved here. When I first came to Ajijic Riberas had a free range rule so you would see cows and goats feeding in the vacant lots and along the road.  This is not The US and Canada I do not understand why people move here and then expell an enormous amount of energy trying to change it to the place they chose to leave.

Only a very mentally sick person would inflict this kind of pain on any of gods creatures.  We have to catch him / her and make sure they are properly punished.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, joanne said:

Certainly not going about it  the right way, but is it conceivable that the poison was meant for the strays and not the dogs of the responsible and caring owners

That is my feeling as well, poisoning stray dogs is very much a rural thing. Many town dwellers release unwanted dogs and puppies in the country, thinking that they will somehow survive. But no, they starve or form wild packs. Many of them get emaciated, with very bad mange. This is where the sighting and legends about Chupacabra come from.

To put this into perspective Mexico City (now CDMX) euthanizes 20,000 dogs - per month. I think Guadalajara is 6,000 dogs.

https://www.cuteness.com/blog/content/facts-about-street-dogs-in-mexico

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if it would be possible to start policing places that sell the poison this horrid creature is using.  He/she obviously has their hands on some lethal amounts of it and what would be the purpose of buying it, other than as a rat poison.  These animals are dying very quickly and it is my limited understanding that rat poison is not so immediate?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chillin, not sure what the point of your post is, and I must disagree with your statement that "poisoning of stray dogs is very much a rural thing".  I don't know how you can say that when it is obvious that many dogs have been poisoned behind their own gates, on the malecon, on the beach at the end of Revolucion, and in various other places in and near the center of town.  Sounds to me that you are making light of the sad, hurtful problem we are experiencing here in our community.  You are deflecting from what the issue really is here.  And, in your most recent post you say that the selling of strychnine in tack shops is "impossible to police at this time".  Who says?  Seems to me that this would be at least one avenue to pursue in trying to stop this cruel poisoning.  Perhaps you actually have some knowledge behind this statement, or do you just find it easy to be a 'naysayer' when someone comes up with a possibly viable route to some solution?

Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Carolina said:

Sounds to me that you are making light of the sad, hurtful problem we are experiencing here in our community.

I'm sorry if I give that impression. I already posted what I think is the best alternative, use the new cat and dog birth control drugs. The trouble is that many of them only last one year, and they are an injectable. This is much more affordable and effective than a spay or neuter clinic.

 

56 minutes ago, Carolina said:

 You are deflecting from what the issue really is here.

The issue, I am introducing, is that a great many Mexicans and foreigners here, do not like street dogs, or people who collect a whole bunch of constantly barking and fighting dogs. Many Mexicans are also afraid of dogs, much more so than in the U.S. or Canada. They do adore their family pets. But on the Mexican tree of life, street dogs and wild packs, do not seem to place highly in this order. These roots run very deeply - the Aztecs buried their sacred pet dogs with them, so they could guide them through the afterlife, but at the same time, kept them around the neighbourhood to put in the stewpot if the crops failed. Maybe this is why there is a disconnect. And yes, the farmers do not appreciate wild packs of dogs, endangering their own animals, this is pesos from their pocket. If you don't believe this, ask your gardeners about what they use to kill rats, ask about wild dog packs in the countryside.

The issue is that this really is a culture clash here. But to drive someone to become a vigilante or maniac, is definitely unacceptable. Also to kill what is obviously a family pet is also unacceptable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sterilization is an invasive surgery, requiring general anesthetic and skilled surgeons.

If you really want to advocate for animals, get this documentary, three years in making, and pass it around, get the one in Spanish too. Give one to the mayor. If you watch the trailer, you will see of the cultural clash. I don't own this DVD, but I am also not an animal advocate, just a lover of life, but not down to extreme Buddhist level.

The point of documentary, is that we really can do better than this.

http://www.companionstonone.com/synopsis.html

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...