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pesticides on strawberries grown locally

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 NOB they use a LOT of different pesticides on strawberries. They recommend eating only the organic ones as they're the worst fruit for pesticide

contamination. Does anyone know if the locally produced strawberries are heavily sprayed like the ones grown in the US?

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Our berries have gotten far too big and perfectly shaped over the past few years, so the growers have definitely learned something... because they don't grow that way naturally. Whether that includes olympic steroids and/or pesticides, I don't know. But they are losing flavour in the process.

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 I used to eat strawberries almost every day whilst living there as they were cheap and absolutley delicious. I'm wondering if in so doing I've unknowingly ingested significant amounts of pesticides. A case of closing the barn door after the horse has already

left, I know. As I recall at the time they were not very big and were irregularly shaped.......

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According to the US gov. Fruit imported from Mexico has lower levels of pesticides  than that grown in the US.

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i got some at the tiangus monday market in chapala and they were small and super sweet. i disinfect everything. Use Nutribiotic. It is GSE grapefruit seed extract. Just put a few drops in pure water and put in the fruit. i usually leave it in 5-10 minutes. if it is something dirty like celery, i leave in longer. then dry on clean towels. I feel it does reduce the pesticides/herbicides/fungicides/and any other things undesirable. Not a perfect cure, but certainly a reduction method. There may be other products just as good, but I always use GSE, known here as Nutribiotic.

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12 hours ago, bmw1150rt said:

According to the US gov. Fruit imported from Mexico has lower levels of pesticides  than that grown in the US.

Is that from the USDA website? In any event best to buy organically produced produce whenever available.

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The consensus of what is said (take with a grain of salt of course) about berries grown around the lake and in Michoacan and sold here in the ubiquitous clear plastic liter containers is that pesticides are used.  However I have also heard that Driscoll has operations here and that they are organic. What I DO know because I`ve visited the place is that Jaime Navarro grows berries for Driscoll near Jaltepec and that those are definitely organic. I don`t know where those are sold. Maybe others can improve this combination of fact and hearsay.

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My doctor is certain that I keep getting reinfected with amoebas from eating the blueberries sold by Paz liquor store. So I had to drop them even though I wash them and soak them in Microdyn.

She also insists I wash things like papaya, apples, pears, cucumbers, oranges but not bananas etc. with soap, water and brush first.

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I thought all the blueberries and strawberries at SuperLake were from Driscoll--I do not think they are organic but maybe Driscoll could weigh in on this. (And we can ask at SuperLake when we see Pancho.) I eat solely fruit for breakfast every morning and have not had amoebas for ages, despite eating blueberries. Strawberries do not agree with me--many people have allergies to strawberries. Excuse me asking, but have you had your water tested at the sink(s)? And how long have you been in Mexico? It took me more than a year to get adjusted to the water and food here--even tho I had perfectly good water at the house (we tested)! Now I have been here almost 10 years, and I have developed some antibodies!

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"Organic" does not always mean that there are no organic chemicals that were used. Organic fruits and veggies can demand a greater price in most markets. Most chemicals used in modern farming are safe by the time the product has reached the store.

The super berries are super due to a growth hormone called gibbarillic acid. This is a relativly safe product for human consumption.

I would wash all fresh fruit and veggies with RO water and use microdine. just because the water tests good, the delivery system can be bad.

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19 minutes ago, JyC said:

The super berries are super due to a growth hormone called gibbarillic acid. This is a relativly safe product for human consumption.

Interesting answer; thanks for that knowledge. Unfortunately, growth hormones are causing un-natural fruit and vegetables that have little to no taste. So what they call "heirloom" products now command 3 to 4 times more than the grocery store version... which used to all heirloom, in a manner of speaking.

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Interesting answers, thank you.

BTW, growth hormones are not desirable in food. A lot of the milk sold in the US contains growth hormones.

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4 hours ago, cedros said:

My doctor is certain that I keep getting reinfected with amoebas from eating the blueberries sold by Paz liquor store. So I had to drop them even though I wash them and soak them in Microdyn.

I have a friend who has been eating the blueberries by Paz liquor store every day, without washing them at all, for months and months and has no intestinal problems.  Makes you wonder, doesn't it?

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I don't think they would use gibberlin on strawberries, it makes plants stretch into more stalk. Not desirable in berry crops. I think what you are seeing is different strains of strawberries - some are meant to look good (red) but actually immature. Check out a good seed catalog and you will see how many varieties there are, each with their own pros and cons.

A big company like Driscoll would be working on varieties all the time. Now there is big workaround for what used to be GMO crops, I wouldn't be surprised if they were researching that area. A variety of strawberry which excels in the Chapala area, but is protected by patents so competitors cannot grow the same.

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When I lived in Santa Fe, NM, Driscoll's berries would be for sale at Whole Foods. organic 5.99 /non-organic 2-3.99. Something like that. maybe they export the organics. They make a killing in the states on them. I went out to Roka Azul last week. Passed through the berry field and they must have just sprayed. The smell was aweful. Vwery toxic , I'm sure. Where do you all get microdine? Is it a form of iodine? People used to use Yoda (sp) a form of iodine to disinfect, but I read somewhere that it is not for long term use.

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Microdine is available at Wally and Soriana in the fruit and veggie departments, The product also kill ameba.

Gibbarillic Acid is used on most all berries, table grapes, most all tree fruits. The problem with the product is not to make the fruit too big or risk splitting the skin of the fruit. Most of the gibbed food items go to the asian market and command very high prices.

Fresh flower markets use gibb to make a more stretched out rose stem.

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22 hours ago, cedros said:

My doctor is certain that I keep getting reinfected with amoebas from eating the blueberries sold by Paz liquor store. So I had to drop them even though I wash them and soak them in Microdyn.

 

1 hour ago, JyC said:

Microdine is available at Wally and Soriana in the fruit and veggie departments, The product also kill ameba.

Gibbarillic Acid is used on most all berries, table grapes, most all tree fruits. The problem with the product is not to make the fruit too big or risk splitting the skin of the fruit. Most of the gibbed food items go to the asian market and command very high prices.

Fresh flower markets use gibb to make a more stretched out rose stem.

.
Science has the answer:  Microdyn... Bacdyn ... Microdine ... are proven for 25 years to  NOT WORK .

Even though the fake names make it sound like they have iodine (a proven disinfectant),   instead they are all bogus  silver solutions.

Detailed CDC, NIH, and UNAM consistently prove that silver solutions like Microdyn, Bacdyn & Microdine do NOT even reduce devastating salmonella like typhoid ...  and do NOT touch amoebas => because silver solutions do not affect the the nastiest salmonellas nor amoebas  -  harmful microbes that come from Mexico's very common spraying liquified human excrement & liquified pig waste onto Mexican fruits and vegetables.

This means that the more frequent problem with Mexican strawberries, lettuce, blueberries is that they are produced Organically,  being sprayed with human excrement & pig excrement for fertilizer ... making them a bigger health threat than having trace levels of pesticides.

Just as the silver solutions Bacdyn, Microdyn et al do not kill nasty salmonellas nor amoebas nor protozoans,   these silver solutions also only reduce  the counts  of other nasty microbes.   This means that even on the microbes affected by Microdyn, Bacdyn et al are only reduced by 50% - to 70%...  leaving plenty of nasty microbes to make us sick.

In the 1990's both the NIH and US FDA recognized that Bacdyn, Microdyn & other silver solutions are bogus for disinfection - and should be avoided - and BANNED their consumption for being taken internally :

https://nccih.nih.gov/health/silver
and
http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/98fr/081799a.txt

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17061512

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Guest bennie2

wash all berries. then put a portion in a saucepan, cover w/water. cover & boil for a minute or two. drain water & serve. you can also drink the dark juice from the water. i have lightly cooked my fruit here for years. (blue berries, bosen berries, grapes). no raw vegetables. 

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This whole scary talk makes me laugh. Driscoll has supplied Mexican berries to Canadian stores for years and  I bet what all of you did before eating them was to put them in a colander under the tap and eat them. They weren't as fresh as the ones we get in front of Paz Liquors and elsewhere here and obviously went through many more bare hands. I have been doing the same here[colander] for 8 years and my friend and his wife for 10. I have never had an amoeba nor anything else and I also eat street food. My friend and his wife have had amoebas a couple of times and they got rid of them in 24 hours with that pill that you can get at any pharmacia. the strawberrys have plenty of flavour and they are so wonderful that you can start smelling them 10 feet from the table. Nothing wrong with the other berries either. Stop worrying about non issues. I am assuming the majority of people on this board are mostly over 50 and we all have survived the horrors of all sorts of things NOB before they were banned and we are still here to talk about it.

To snowyco: read on McDuff and stick to things that you may have some knowledge of and aren't you busy enough in Yucatan passing off [ahem]information there?:rolleyes:

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Guest bennie2

after having throat infections for several years, i changed my habits. boiling the fruit for me is smart. would do the same in the US. its not only chemicals but all kinds of bacterias. people pick fruit, they have hands. 

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4 minutes ago, bennie2 said:

after having throat infections for several years, i changed my habits. boiling the fruit for me is smart. would do the same in the US. its not only chemicals but all kinds of bacterias. people pick fruit, they have hands. 

And witch doctor diagnosed the reason for your throat infections?

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Guest bennie2

the infections started right after i moved here. they were all the time for 3 years. sometimes for another few years. throat ect from several enviremental factors. im not recommending a dr because you dont have those problems. since you are a know it all, the case is closed.

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On 10/21/2016 at 3:48 PM, Yo1 said:

I have a friend who has been eating the blueberries by Paz liquor store every day, without washing them at all, for months and months and has no intestinal problems.  Makes you wonder, doesn't it?

.
Each of our Gastro Intestinal (GI) systems are individually different, and changing over time.    This means one person can have a gut that tolerates big doses of nasty microbes,  that would make everyone else at the dinner sick.

Why?  The lining of our GI system is constantly changing, constantly evolving, as it has the fastest-dividing  fastest-replaced cells (epithelial cells) in our bodies.  

Our GI epithelial cells are   constantly swapping   little pieces of DNA with the DNA in the bacteria & microbes living in our guts.   One troubling example?  There is a kind of e. coli bacteria from cow's guts, that when we ingest it (from sloppy butchering),  the  cow e. coli  inserts a snippet of its DNA into OUR GI lining epithelial cell's DNA -  permanently altering our GI epithelial cells.  (permanent = short of having a fecal transplant of healthy gut microbes) 

That piece of   cow e. coli  DNA  hiding in our GI DNA then acts as a back-door    with a chemical pass-key   that allows other future  e. coli    to pass through our GI lining,   straight into our blood stream - bypassing our immune system's GI defenses.

This means that a person's GI tract is a rough cumulative   historical record   of everything we've eaten.     

I used to have a cast-iron gut,   until working in Ukraine for 2 months - and getting awful food poisoning 4 times,  that has left me with a super wimpy gut 24 years later.

A key example of the consequences of what we eat changing our guts?
Consider that 1 in 6 Mexican kindergartners in one good CDC study were found to have continual endemic asymptomatic salmonella infections => salmonella carriers,  who had no symptoms.

So,  when one person at the dinner party gets food poisoning, while  'everyone else is fine' ,   it's just because the other diner's had more robust - better prepared GI systems.

and .... when some old geezer with a special-history GI system keeps eating contaminated food for years ... It's still not safe for the rest of us

unless you want to get a fecal transplant from the geezer - swapping poo ...  (using suppositories of course)
;)

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Eat  the berries here with impunity and if you believe the expert from Yucatan , snowyco aka YucaLandia, then I can also hook you up with a bridge in Brooklyn.

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I'm sticking with GSE (grapefruit seed extract) for the disinfecting process. Thanks for the heads up Snowyco. I used to eat ALOT  of street food. Mimimizing that this time around. I do disinfect everything i put thru my juicer as juicing will intensify the amount of anything negative you are getting. I do eat the berrie but less frequently as i have more than once picked out a bucket of them when the vendor then decided to give me other than i pointed to and get them home aqnd they are half moldy on the bottom. I'm over that Trick. You win a few and lose a few I guess. 

With fruit that I gather from the ground, such as guavas, I usually boil and make a jam or jelly. 

Bennies idea seems like a good solution for her. 

Ned Small, it is really "small " of you to put others down when they are trying to protect themselves from dire health problems. Take what you like and eat the rest. 

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