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I am looking to connect with others who (are living in this immediate area of Lake Chapala) : 

Have sought out and utilized Homeopathy, as per Dr. Samuel Hahnemann's teachings.

This would be for a mutual sharing of resources and experience.   I am interested in hearing

from those who have benefited (or would like to benefit),  as this applies for both human and pet health.

Please PM me directly.   

Thank you.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Yo1 said:

 

Why post anything at all of this nature?  OP didn't ask for anyone's opinion.

...And Bontekoe didn't ask for yours. But at least he/she appears to have an idea as to what a fraud homeopathy is, and in exposing it as such, perhaps saving someone some money they really can't afford to waste. Homeopathy is a fraud, but if you can prove otherwise, please do so.

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Quote

 

Likewise...If you can prove that it IS a fraud, please do so.

I have benefited from homeopathy twice...my dog who was very afraid of thunder and fireworks always calmed right down with Rescue Remedy. I recently benefited by taking Ignatia for grief.

Each to his/her own.

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16 minutes ago, Ferret said:

Likewise...If you can prove that it IS a fraud, please do so.

I have benefited from homeopathy twice...my dog who was very afraid of thunder and fireworks always calmed right down with Rescue Remedy. I recently benefited by taking Ignatia for grief.

Each to his/her own.

 Here's a summary of findings by The Lancet. A suitably reliable source, I hope. There are many, many other studies that come to the same conclusion: feel free to do some research on your own. Do you know what the medical professions call alternative medicine that works? Medicine. Homeopathy isn't it.

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26 minutes ago, Yo1 said:

Many people have benefited from homeopathy without believing in it, so not a placebo in their case.

 

Again, she didn't ask for anyone's opinion.  In fact, she asked for private messages.

 

An open mind and research brought us to Mexico.  Just think what the same might do for your health.  

http://www.integrativepractitioner.com/whats-new/news-and-commentary/harvard-study-has-good-news-for-homeopathic-medicine/

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Yes, the Lancet is a more than suitable source. However, sometimes conventional medicine doesn't work and people look for alternatives. Until you are one of those people, you won't ever get it.

I remember when Chiropracters were also considered quacks.

An interesting read... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1847554/

I suppose you're in the group that doesn't believe in the benefits of medical marijuana either? Sometimes it just takes time for the "proof" to catch up with all the anecdotal evidence.

 

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For those who are interested, I have included a link to a  (free) book, to understand what I am referring to in that of Samuel Hahnemann approach to Homeopathy:

http://www.drdooley.net/Book.pdf

The word itself, Homeopathy, conjures up images of a person treating themselves with herbs and multiple "natural" off the shelf treatments.  In fact, the above approach, uses one remedy, to treat the whole person, and frowns upon multiple ingredients or remedies.  That read is a valued resource, many true Homeopathic Doctors recommend patients read.  A great clarifier to be certain, for so much is termed Homeopathy.

 

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1 hour ago, PORTIMOM said:

 

An open mind and research brought us to Mexico.  Just think what the same might do for your health.  

http://www.integrativepractitioner.com/whats-new/news-and-commentary/harvard-study-has-good-news-for-homeopathic-medicine/

Did you read the article? At no point does it say that homeopathy has any better efficacy than does the placebo effect. In fact, it states quite clearly that most benefits are tangential to homeopathy's health claims; benefits such as keeping people from needless, and potentially harmfull, use of antibiotics. To repeat, at no point does the article state, without qualification, that homeopathy actually works!

 

Sorry for the late addendum, but here is a summary of a 1994 study on alternative medicines done by Washington and Alaska Blue-Cross.

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30 minutes ago, MarkWebles said:

Did you read the article? At no point does it say that homeopathy has any better efficacy than does the placebo effect. In fact, it states quite clearly that most benefits are tangential to homeopathy's health claims; benefits such as keeping people from needless, and potentially harmfull, use of antibiotics. To repeat, at no point does the article state, without qualification, that homeopathy actually works!

 

 

Thanks for checking out that link.

We each have to choose what is right for us.  There will always be those who counter our choices, much like the static that many of us heard in our choice to move to Mexico.  Point being, is if you listen too closely to those who say nay, then you may indeed miss out.   I am not here to change peoples views, ridicule, or gossip about others, when perspective differs.  

If you will please note, the original post said: Please PM me directly.  

 

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39 minutes ago, MarkWebles said:

Sorry for the late addendum, but here is a summary of a 1994 study on alternative medicines done by Washington and Alaska Blue-Cross.

This article is hopelessly outdated.  In the late 1990s and early 2000s I sat on the advisory board of the largest "alternative care insurance" company in the US.  We regularly met to advise the insurance company of the efficacy of different "complimentay" medical modalities and advised whether or not the insurance should pay for these modalities.  Homeopathy claims were routinely paid.  As an aside--Reiki was not considered efficacious and claims were not paid. 

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1 hour ago, Ferret said:
1 hour ago, Ferret said:

Yes, the Lancet is a more than suitable source. However, sometimes conventional medicine doesn't work and people look for alternatives. Until you are one of those people, you won't ever get it.

I remember when Chiropracters were also considered quacks.

An interesting read... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1847554/

I suppose you're in the group that doesn't believe in the benefits of medical marijuana either? Sometimes it just takes time for the "proof" to catch up with all the anecdotal evidence.

 

Yes, the Lancet is a more than suitable source. However, sometimes conventional medicine doesn't work and people look for alternatives. Until you are one of those people, you won't ever get it.

I remember when Chiropracters were also considered quacks.

An interesting read... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1847554/

I suppose you're in the group that doesn't believe in the benefits of medical marijuana either? Sometimes it just takes time for the "proof" to catch up with all the anecdotal evidence.

 

Interesting, but not convincing. One of the studies quoted concludes...

"At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials."

But they didn't include this in the article you linked to. I would love to see the results of some "well performed trials".

Ad hominems aren't really the best way to make a point, don't you think? But to your final point, on marijuana, it at least has an identifiable active ingredient, THC, homeopathic remedies are, for all intents and purposes, pure water. Until someone can provide evidence (not proof, as you posted above) as to how it will cure cancer, or my halitosis, or a child's skinned knee, I'll remain a skeptic.

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16 minutes ago, Yo1 said:

This article is hopelessly outdated.  In the late 1990s and early 2000s I sat on the advisory board of the largest "alternative care insurance" company in the US.  We regularly met to advise the insurance company of the efficacy of different "complimentay" medical modalities and advised whether or not the insurance should pay for these modalities.  Homeopathy claims were routinely paid.  As an aside--Reiki was not considered efficacious and claims were not paid. 

This is all well and good, but it says nothing about whether or not it works.

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51 minutes ago, Yo1 said:

Interesting article on Swiss govt. findings of homeopathy efficacy.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dana-ullman/homeopathic-medicine-_b_1258607.html

I'm curious, what do you read into this vis-a-vis the efficacy of homeopathy. I find it to be as bereft of coherence as much of what the HP publishes. The first sentence positively screams logical fallacy: "The Swiss government has a long and widely-respected history of neutrality, and therefore, reports from this government on controversial subjects need to be taken more seriously..." Things go downhill from there. ...and therefore? Really?

 

Edited to add: Dana Ullman is not a scientist, nor is he a doctor, he is a writer selling a book.

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I had a cat when I lived in Canada- every summer she would get a large " hot spot" on her back just above her tail. She would chew it til it was totally raw. Took her to vets, to little avail. Then went to a homeopathic vet who gave me a remedy, 3 times a day for 3 days. Hot spot disappeared quickly and NEVER came back.

So for all you skeptics, I can attest that, at least in this case, it did work.

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22 hours ago, Ferret said:

Likewise...If you can prove that it IS a fraud, please do so.

I have benefited from homeopathy twice...my dog who was very afraid of thunder and fireworks always calmed right down with Rescue Remedy. I recently benefited by taking Ignatia for grief.

Each to his/her own.

Rescue Remedy is 27% Grape Based Brandy and as such is not an homeopathic solution. Homeopathic solutions are, by definition, pure water.

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MarkWebles--how can you not understand that if the CAM (complementary and alternative medicine) insurance company and the Swiss govt. ONLY pay for modalities that are efficacious, that there MIGHT be something to this type of treatment?

 

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22 hours ago, Lexy said:

Portimon--Did anyone PM you directly, as you requested, and give you an answer that was useful to you? Hope so.

Lexy

I did receive PM's... Not necessarily looking an "answer" though.  More so, a mutually beneficial exchange of experiences and information. I really did not expect to have heard from many, as most of us are brought up on conventional and big pharma.  One person that I have heard from, was not aware that there was a Homeopathic Vet which visits our area.  Much to be gained from this exchange of information.

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