Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard
Mainecoons

Time For The Annual Guess Start of Rainy Season Thread

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, mudgirl said:

Why do you guys call them rainbirds when they are insects? Just curious.

Because when you start to hear them rain will fall four to six weeks later.   Well thats what I heard.  LCS has some rainbirds on the wall in a display.  They look like big crickets or small grasshoppers.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We must differentiate them from the ubiquitous snowbirds; another seasonal phenomenon in this rather salubrious micro-climate.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For whatever it's worth, Accuweather thinks that it will rain for the next five days starting tomorrow afternoon.  They seem to be a little better at guessing than the other sites. Last year they called the shot ten days ahead of time for that very wet weekend in March.  They aren't saying it will be heavy.  Just showers late afternoon and early evening.  Accuweather IS saying it will be a wet summer and could kick the Lake up.  As we all know, we only get water from the damns if they have NO place to put it.  Here's wishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, lcscats said:

Because when you start to hear them rain will fall four to six weeks later.   Well thats what I heard.  LCS has some rainbirds on the wall in a display.  They look like big crickets or small grasshoppers.

 

 

That didn't answer my question at all. Why do you call them birds when they are insects? And yes, I know what they look like. They are cicadas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The insects tell us it is going to rain at some time in future.  So we call them rain birds.   Rain insects doesn't sound very good at all so Rain Birds. Some folks say they sound like birds more than insects might be what you are looking for.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, RVGRINGO said:

We must differentiate them from the ubiquitous snowbirds; another seasonal phenomenon in this rather salubrious micro-climate.

Love this, RV!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just call them what everyone else called them when I arrived 16 or more years ago. Not the locals, mind: I've never asked what they call them. If I used colloquial terms here all the time, you'd find me saying "WalMar" and "Ajijee"... along with my own first name, "Mr. Mi".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The locals here tend to call these vociferous large flying insects Chicharras.   Also, if you look up cicada in the Spanish-English dictionary, chicharra will be the most common translation they will give.  I too have tried to translate verbatim the phrase rain birds into Spanish only to receive quizzical looks from the locals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Idiomatic expressions, like humor, seldom translate from one language/culture to another. That is why puzzled looks are so common when it is attempted. It simply makes no sense at all; absolutely none.  So, put that in your pipe and smoke it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

I just call them what everyone else called them when I arrived 16 or more years ago. Not the locals, mind: I've never asked what they call them. If I used colloquial terms here all the time, you'd find me saying "WalMar" and "Ajijee"... along with my own first name, "Mr. Mi".

 

4 hours ago, dichosalocura said:

The locals here tend to call these vociferous large flying insects Chicharras.   Also, if you look up cicada in the Spanish-English dictionary, chicharra will be the most common translation they will give.  I too have tried to translate verbatim the phrase rain birds into Spanish only to receive quizzical looks from the locals.

Thank you both for the explanation. In other words, that's what the gringos called them because they thought they were birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It‘s OK, Muddled. You will figure it out someday.<_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/10/2016 at 0:05 AM, solajijic said:

June 11 mid-afternoon about 3.

 

I will be lamenting the start because THIS is my favorite time of year here and we are not going north this summer so I will have to suffer a rainy season - ugh.

The rainy season is the BEST time of the year

June 15th

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm probably cheating because I ran a lightning station

http://en.blitzortung.org/live_lightning_maps.php?map=30

The big storms have been forming for 2 weeks east of here and slowly easing west.  Should be her in about 2 weeks.

There was a storm east of the lake last night about 2am

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, mudgirl said:

 

In other words, that's what the gringos called them because they thought they were birds.

What do you call a Canary in a Coal Mine?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Travis said:

Oooops. Forgot to pick a date. When will the rainy season begin?

I'm going with....mañana:lol:

Or a crow filing for black lung benifits

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mudgirl said:

 

Thank you both for the explanation. In other words, that's what the gringos called them because they thought they were birds.

In a word, no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The correct name is Chicarra in Spanish for cicada. Some Mexicans may not know the word.  The name is a direct derivation of the Latin cicada, meaning "tree cricket" . Using a translator you may be given slang words as well. 

In Spanish, as in English,  a common word can be used for slang in different areas.  Example in this area a person with a lot of money "tiene la lana"  (has the wool). In DF "tiene la plata" (has the silver) in the USA has lots of dough. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Mostlylost said:

The correct name is Chicarra in Spanish for cicada. Some Mexicans may not know the word.  The name is a direct derivation of the Latin cicada, meaning "tree cricket" .  

I think almost all Mexicans know the word.

And then there is the chicharra torture device..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, 3/4 inch of rain at the official station, storm came out of the north.  May be just a backlash stream of moisture from that huge low pressure in East Texas and Louisiana.  Let's see if there's a follow on in the next two days.  Easterly flow not really established but at least the 300 mb jet stream from the west seems to be easing.

Interesting, this is the same pattern that gave us that nice downpour a few weeks back.  It didn't last however as it is not a true monsoonal flow.

Wow, the lightning really cranked up when the thing got over the lake.  Did it really pour on the south shore?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...