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Obtaining Mexican citizenship.


Mostlylost

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Mostly, try http://en.sre.gob.mx/index.php/naturalization-certificate-through-residence-in-mexicowhat does appear to be missing from the list, which the link is in English, is the Security Clearance letter. Also I was of the opinion that, if, over 60 you needn't take the history exam. My suggestion is use an immigration attorney as your project manager and do the legwork youself. There are a few choices for an attorney - Mr. mcMullen aka Spencer --- not the S &S Spencer, Sr.Bercerra and Sra. Bateman located near LCS. To watch, imo, is the timing such as certain docs within 3o days of application, for example the photo's.

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Thanks for the responses so far.

I really am not looking for referrals to attorneys.

Thanks El Cartero, However the web page you link hasn't been updated since July of 2012 Refers to FM2. Really doesn't help as rules have changed

Daisy 2013 Thanks for your response. Please PM me

I'm still asking has anyone recently gone through the process?? Doing it yourself??

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We can help but you must do the process personally, we can review papers and go over requirements, check names and prepare the letters needed to avoid multiple trips.

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If you have 5 years of residency on a combination of FM2, permanente or temporal (FM3 doesn't count), a recent long form birth certificate apostilled and translated into Spanish, passports having legible stamps showing trips in and out of Mexico (less than 180 days out of the country in the last 24 months) and finally matching names on birth certificate, visa and passport then you have most of what you need to apply.

Because of the number of steps involved and interaction with multiple agencies I would use an immigration attorney if for no other reason than shortening the duration of the process. Do over's can be time consuming and costly.

We met with an attorney in early September 2014, made the application late September and received our cartas in early February 2015. SRE along with most other governent agencies are also closed for a few weeks at year end. There was no written test and in reality no formal check of our Spanish at the Guadalajara office. Just nice conversation while we made the last copies and waited for the attorney to return from the bank after paying the application fee.

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My husband did the whole process the first part of 2015. Not difficult without an attorney.He is over 60 so no test was reqauired. We did everything ourselves except we used Alvarro at LCS to obtain the Federal document needed to state you aren't a criminal. You can only obtain it in/from MX city.

Birth certificate apostille

Marriage license/s if for a woman, all apostile

Jalisco State document stating you aren't a criminal (obtain at the federal palace approx 50 pesos)

Federal document stating you aren't a criminal (we used a lawyer)

Curp document

Copy of your passport

We provided a list of dates that we flew in and out of the country in the last 5 years (or you can just copy all pages of your passport)

Letter stating why you want to become nationalized in Spanish

Copies of your current immigration document - permanente card

Fill out the online application

We took all documents to SRE in GDL and had them look at them. THEN we made an appointment to present the documents to them.

It is all in Spanish so you need to know enough Spanish to answer questions such as your name, address etc. When we had the appointment to present the documents it took about a half an hour.

You are given a clave number etc. to check the status of your application online. We we able to see when the application had been forward to each agency involved (there are a lot).

Whole process took two months from application presentation to picking up final documents.

You must first qualify to be able to apply. The requirements are on the SRE web page under nationalization.

Hope this helps.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the responses so far.

I really am not looking for referrals to attorneys.

Thanks El Cartero, However the web page you link hasn't been updated since July of 2012 Refers to FM2. Really doesn't help as rules have changed

Daisy 2013 Thanks for your response. Please PM me

I'm still asking has anyone recently gone through the process?? Doing it yourself??

My husband and I went through the preliminary work through a local attorney. When we were sent to Guadalajara to be interviewed, we met with a Mexican facilitator who then accompanied us. The bureaucrat who did the interview insisted we needed to have conversational Spanish ability, but his accent was unintelligible to either of us as well as the facilitator. Since my spouse is heavily hearing impaired but uses aids, that factor didn't help. Maybe the interviewer had a speech impediment or just very heavy accent. In short, we didn't cut it and that was the end of our hopeful journey to citizenship. If the test had been in writing rather than spoken, both of us could have easily passed, but that's not the system. Our attorney said we might have better luck in Mexico City, but we just gave up at that point. Best to know this up front. Later, I have learned that the matter of becoming a Mexican citizen while also a U.S. citizen can present some difficulties for some people. We're Permanente, so that will have to do.

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Out of curiosity, would anyone be willing to share what their reasons were for wanting to become a Mexican citizen rather than to just have permanente status? What advantage is there to it? Why go to that trouble? Thanks.

One reason: laws change at the wishes of the lawmakers. Once citizenship is achieved, a foreigner has no more worries about Permanente status being subject to change.

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Two main reasons for citizenship:

Banks do not report assets/income back to the IRS and if you sell a house, no reporting is made either.

If you buy a property near the beach or border you can own the property outright. No fideicomiso is required.

Airport departures and arrivals are a lot easier. No stops at INM first and the customs process can be easier.

With an INE (IFE) card you are able to vote for the party of your choice. Not terribly exciting but the process is very interesting.Free picture ID's are obviously possible.

Possible changes to immigration rules could definitely be a concern, especially if the US and Mexico get into a squabble.

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Out of curiosity, would anyone be willing to share what their reasons were for wanting to become a Mexican citizen rather than to just have permanente status? What advantage is there to it? Why go to that trouble? Thanks.

Good question.

I have Permanente status,have been married to a Mexican for ten years,speak Spanish and could easily pass the history examin,but I just don't see the point in going to the trouble.

Unless you want to vote,for the "menos mal"I don't see much point in it.

Just my opinion.

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At the GDL passport we need to present both. The US passport to be entered in the system so that Global Entry works properly at arrival and the Mexican passport as our immigration document. No stop at INM which is a blessing.

I think the US might take a dim view of presenting a Mexican passport at customs.

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  • 3 weeks later...

With a Mexican passport you can also visit any country in South America without needing a visa. A US passport holder must pay $160 to stop in Brazil for instance. A lot of countries have reciprocity exit fees for US citizens too.

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John, so when you travel by air you present a Mexican passport at the airline desk and thereby bypass INM?

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Both Mexicans & US citizens have to fill out and submit an INM form, to exit Mexico by air, but US citizens carrying Mexican passports fill-out & submit the INM form for Mexicans.

US passport use required at Mexican airports for flights into the USA:
Airlines require that we show our US passport at the Mexican airport check-in counters for 2 reasons.
1) If you show only a Mexican passport, then the airlines have to check for a US-issued visa permitting you to enter the USA. US citizens carrying both Mexican & US passports do not have a US-visa in their Mexican passport.

2) US TSA-Homeland Security has different rules for US citizens than for foreigners. We have to show our US passports at the Mexican airport ticket counter, to be logged-in correctly into the US TSA-Homeland Security systems.


Legal principles that drive these processes:
When in Mexico, we are supposed to use only our Mexican passports & INE/IFE cards for legal activities with the Mex. Gob. while in Mexico. The converse applies of using only our US passport when interacting with the US govt.

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We're going on a cruise next year that starts in Argentina and ends in Brazil. No need for anything other than a Mexican passport since the flights will be GDL-MEX and then south.

On another trip to Ecuador we fly back to Dallas so both passports will be required so that the TSA NSA CIA & FBI know where we are even though we're just in transit.

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