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arsenic and other pollutants in Lermer-Chapala aquifer


gypsyken
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Just now, RVGRINGO said:

I drank tap water in Chapala, simply filtered and sometimes treated with UV, but often not, from age 65 to 78  and still do not glow in the dark, or exhibit other symptoms. Now, at 81, I suspect that something may eventually kill me, but I am too busy to worry about it.

Some people get sick and others do not.  We are not all in the same physical health depending on habits, etc.  Those harmful elements were still not meant to be consumed.  I prefer to not wait until there is a problem.

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  • 6 months later...

We have the usual two canister  filters with an UV light plus water softener. For our drinking water, we have osmosis. I was told to change the canister filters on the osmosis unit every three months and the osmosis filter every six months.It seems to me that would vary with usage. How does one really know when to change the parts. They are not cheap?

 

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UV light changed annually.

Canister filters should last 6 months depending on usage.  

Al Berca, doesn't Aguagente change cartridges annually?  We installed in GDL apartment we have for our Oaxaca students and the deal is they are supposed to fully service unit and change cartridges every year.

 

 

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On 12/1/2015 at 10:08 PM, gypsyken said:

According to an article in today's Mexico News Daily (mexiconewsdaily.com), in 2001 arsenic and fluoride in the Lermer-Chapala aquifer were in "concentrations 10 times greater than what are deemed tolerable limits for human consumption," and now "concentrations [of pollutants] have doubled in some places, and arsenic--a carcinogen--has been recorded at 20 and up to 30 times over its acceptable levels." Does anyone have information about the levels of arsenic and other pollutants in tap water at Lakeside?

A village east of Mezcala (Zapetera) was found to have large unsafe levels of arsenic in their well water. Dr Tod strong work with them to find a solution and found they possessed a permit to take a certain amount of water from the lake. CNE allowed them to use part of this irrigation allotment for drinking water. Dr Strong built them a large sand filter for the lake water and showed them how to maintain it. It is now used to fill carboys with water for the village. It was a surprise to me that the  lake water was much more pure than their draw from the aquifer. This effort was made possible with financial assistance from several gringo organizations. I hope yours was one of them. 

How to remove arsenic from drinking water.

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On 12/2/2015 at 7:17 PM, lcscats said:

When I had the city water tested it was considered safe. Wonder if different wells get water out of different locations underground. When I use a TDS meter I see 650ppm before home water treatment in upper Ajijic. I measured 350ppm in La Floresta so the water must vary from well to well right??

Yes various wells differ drastically in water composition and quality. The water is also contaminated after it comes from the well. In areas where SIMAPA doesn't keep the pressure on continuously small leaks in the pipes leak into the soil and them syphon the water with contaminates back into the pipe when the pressure is turned off. When the pressure is turned back on the pipe delivers this contaminated water to downstream homes. 

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8 hours ago, Mainecoons said:

 

Al Berca, doesn't Aguagente change cartridges annually?  We installed in GDL apartment we have for our Oaxaca students and the deal is they are supposed to fully service unit and change cartridges every year.

You are correct. Each year,  they call within a week of your original installation date and make an appointment to come out to change multiple cartridges and completely check out unit to make sure it is working properly at no charge. Which makes sense since they own the unit and I am renting it from them. They also test the tap water before and after replacements and show you the difference. Mine was minimal as I only use that tap for drinking water normally.

 

 

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On 10/30/2018 at 12:15 PM, Zeb said:

Perhaps this can be of some who are unfamiliar with it.  They also offer a filter for the shower as all is absorbed through the skin as well.

Berkey Fluoride Water Filter- PF2 (Set of 2)

Adds the ability to reduce Fluoride, Arsenic and MTBE to the Black Purification element

Instead of spending $260+ for a Berkey filter why not build your own and save $200 less. You can order the parts and pick up 2 use restaurant  supply 5 gallon buckets for free. 

Here is everything you need except the buckets for $30

 

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  • 7 months later...
On 5/9/2019 at 8:10 AM, HarryB said:

We have the usual two canister  filters with an UV light plus water softener. For our drinking water, we have osmosis. I was told to change the canister filters on the osmosis unit every three months and the osmosis filter every six months.It seems to me that would vary with usage. How does one really know when to change the parts. They are not cheap?

 

I check the filters on a regular basis and when they look ¨dirty¨ I change  them. Not a very scientific way but what choices are there? Some wells have much ¨dirtier¨ than others.

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On 5/9/2019 at 9:32 AM, geeser said:

A village east of Mezcala (Zapetera) was found to have large unsafe levels of arsenic in their well water. Dr Tod strong work with them to find a solution and found they possessed a permit to take a certain amount of water from the lake. CNE allowed them to use part of this irrigation allotment for drinking water. Dr Strong built them a large sand filter for the lake water and showed them how to maintain it. It is now used to fill carboys with water for the village. It was a surprise to me that the  lake water was much more pure than their draw from the aquifer. This effort was made possible with financial assistance from several gringo organizations. I hope yours was one of them. 

How to remove arsenic from drinking water.

The town of Chapala has arsenic in their wells.

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The town of Chapala is required by way of their extraction concessions with Conagua to test the water taken from their wells on a scheduled basis.  The water is tested by Agua Jalisco and the test results are on file at the SIMAPA office in Chapala.   If you are interested in seeing them, go in and ask to see them.  I have "heard" also that Chapala has a bit of a struggle with arsenic levels in one or more of their wells but have never investigated it further because I don't live there.  The wells I take care of east of Chapala are well below the maximum for allowable arsenic of 0.025 mg/l. (per NOM-127-SSA1-1994).

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40 minutes ago, Ezzie said:

The town of Chapala is required by way of their extraction concessions with Conagua to test the water taken from their wells on a scheduled basis.  The water is tested by Agua Jalisco and the test results are on file at the SIMAPA office in Chapala.   If you are interested in seeing them, go in and ask to see them.  I have "heard" also that Chapala has a bit of a struggle with arsenic levels in one or more of their wells but have never investigated it further because I don't live there.  The wells I take care of east of Chapala are well below the maximum for allowable arsenic of 0.025 mg/l. (per NOM-127-SSA1-1994).

Yo1,why don't you go to SIMAPA and report your scientific findings to us.

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3 minutes ago, happyjillin said:

So tell us then, giving parts per million  instead of your nebulous post saying nothing. since you haven't posted any figures so I put it too you that you haven't done so.

 

You are just cruising for a fight.  I don't give a rip about the water in Chapala because I don't live there either.  And the residents drink bottled or purified water for a very good reason.  Go fight with someone who's interested.

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I have been here some 21 years and I don't remember hearing about a filter called Berkey, until recently. Now, like others I am suspicious why it is getting so much attention.  Could it be marketing hype? I just don't know.

What I do know is that I have a water system that works just great, and it is not a Berkey Fluoride Water Filter :) 

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