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noise levels on Zaragoza


SuzieQ1954

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We are considering a lease on a house on Zaragoza. I know the bus runs along there, but is the street cobblestone? What is the general noise level along the street?

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Major thoroughfare, lots of trucks blasting their spiels about fruit/veggies, gas, wáter, etc. Cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles. Noise from plaza coming straight down the street.

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SuzyQ you don't say how long the lease is. I am guessing you'll be brand new to the area? Or have you lived here before? If you are new, and the lease isn't too long, and you are tolerant and have a sense of adventure, living in central Ajiic may be really fun for you for awhile. If it's a long term lease and quiet is important to you, you might want to reconsider. When we first moved here we lived in Central Ajijic for about 6 months. It was really fun, and great to be able to walk everywhere. Over the long haul, it was too loud for us for long term living. The streets are mostly all narrow and cobblestone, and the cohetes, gas trucks, etc make for a fairly boisterous existence. There are also many, many people who wouldn't want to live anywhere else. It's all a matter of personal choice.

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I live just off Zaragoza and have for eight years. Yes, it is noisy but after being cooped up in an air conditioned house in the US, I do not mind it. I love this Mexican neighborhood. The noise is always over by 10:00 p.m. and seldom starts before 8:00 a.m. You can walk everywhere. And I have been here long enough now that much of the noise I do not hear.

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The house we are considering is about midway on Zaragoza between Alvaro Obrego'n and 5 de Febrero. We both expect some noise and can tolerate during the day but do need some hours of quiet for sleep. It is a stand alone house, so no common walls. Can't tell how close the neighbors are. We are coming from SA, TX area with large Hispanic population, so we know about loud bass and parties. Our parks are full of families picnicking every weekend. So, I think, we are somewhat acclimated to the culture, although I expect a gentleness in the Ajijic natives that seems to be lacking sometimes NOB.

The comment about the dust probably bothers me more than anything. I lived behind a wall in Libya with goats and camels coming by and an unused traintrack just outside my gate. I don't recall a great deal of dust from the traffic. There was, however, a great deal of dust when a "gibli" blew for four days. Even with the windows shuttered with wooden shutters little sand dunes collected on the window sills and under the doors. I just waited for it to be over then swept up the sand.

I have also had a goat pee on my entry hall carpet when my children were gifted with a baby goat, which a few months later disappeared and arrived barbequed on my friend's dinner table. As we were invited to that dinner, I saw the tears roll down my young son's cheeks as he asked, "is this gatos?" It was. Oh the adventures of living the expat life.

I think we will probably chance the Zaragoza house, as it is otherwise perfect for us. It is not a life and death decision, now is it?

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Ask the guys at Casa Flores B&B. They front on Zaragoza, bedrooms set back from the street. I have stayed there and there is no street noise to speak of. Of course you hear sounds from the plaza, gas and other truck recordings but you have that all over town. if your house has living and sleeping rooms that aren't fronting the street but are set back to some degree, you will be fine.

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The house we are considering is about midway on Zaragoza between Alvaro Obrego'n and 5 de Febrero. We both expect some noise and can tolerate during the day but do need some hours of quiet for sleep. It is a stand alone house, so no common walls. Can't tell how close the neighbors are. We are coming from SA, TX area with large Hispanic population, so we know about loud bass and parties. Our parks are full of families picnicking every weekend. So, I think, we are somewhat acclimated to the culture, although I expect a gentleness in the Ajijic natives that seems to be lacking sometimes NOB.

The comment about the dust probably bothers me more than anything. I lived behind a wall in Libya with goats and camels coming by and an unused traintrack just outside my gate. I don't recall a great deal of dust from the traffic. There was, however, a great deal of dust when a "gibli" blew for four days. Even with the windows shuttered with wooden shutters little sand dunes collected on the window sills and under the doors. I just waited for it to be over then swept up the sand.

I have also had a goat pee on my entry hall carpet when my children were gifted with a baby goat, which a few months later disappeared and arrived barbequed on my friend's dinner table. As we were invited to that dinner, I saw the tears roll down my young son's cheeks as he asked, "is this gatos?" It was. Oh the adventures of living the expat life.

I think we will probably chance the Zaragoza house, as it is otherwise perfect for us. It is not a life and death decision, now is it?

I think you will do just fine here and I think you'll be happy with the rental on Zaragoza.

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