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Car nationalization


Mexiken

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I'm not sure that you can nationalize a car at this time. The other day I received an email from Oscar, the well recommended broker in Nogales whose last name evades me at this moment, saying that cars cannot be nationalized now but he could do other things.

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Nationalization and legalization are two different processes. The conditions are very different also.

If you plan to drive the vehicle to Baja, Quintana Roo, or out of the country then you need to legalize the vehicle, pay taxes at the border, and obtain a pedimento at the border.

If you intend to only drive within the other Mexican states, then you can nationalize the vehicle locally. You can obtain Mexican liability insurance for either a nationalized or legalized vehicle but you cannot obtain full-coverage insurance for a nationalized vehicle. The cost difference between the two processes is significant. The window to nationalize or legalize vehicles closes periodically so your deposit may be in suspension until the window opens again.

Talk to a lawyer who knows the difference. Selling a nationalized vehicle in Mexico is complicated. Those were the laws and regulations a couple of months ago, as always, in regards to today, things may have changed again.

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At the border 2006 and 2007, NAFTA made, only US registered (not Canadian registered); costs I am told are $1500 to $3000. My information comes from talking with these people: superimportaciones.com And information from others who have nationalized at the border. Before going though call and ask price, time / documents required, process.

Oscar can not nationalize cars once in Mexico as he has no amparo and the company he works for was and may still be under investigation. I only know of one active amparo at this time. :-)

There are no issues with selling a nationalized car and I have seen it done often and as recent as last month including our own SUV. The selling process is identical to selling any Mexican state registered vehicle. And yes you get full insurance coverage.

saludos

Sonia

www.soniadiaz.mx

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Kiko said, "If you intend to only drive within the other Mexican states, then you can nationalize the vehicle locally."

Would you like to expand on this statement as it seems to be contradictory to everything that is being said these days....

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  • 4 weeks later...

Ask a honest insurance broker if a Mexican insurer will pay off in the event of total loss of your vehicle without a certified pedimento. Ask Bellon lakeside.

Some facilitators/lawyers are offering to nationalize a vehicle with Edo Mexico plates and tarjeta de circulacion thru the Gob of Edo Mexico, but no pedimento. That is not the same process as legalizing a vehicle, paying import taxes, and obtaining a certified pedimento at the border. Two different processes.

Yes you can buy full coverage insurance for a nationalized (sin pedimento) vehicle, but I doubt seriously the insurance carrier will pay off if the event of total loss.

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Liability only insurance for foreign plated cars in Mexico is available online from Lewis and Lewis, who is representing the Mexican insurance giant Qualitas. GNP also sells this. The legal wording does not weasle out on Permanent Residents of Mexico,in fact it clearly states it covers all drivers who are legal residents of Mexico but not citizens. The vehicle must have valid ownership registration in the U.S. or Canada, but up to date plates are not required. What the local lawyers are calling legalization, gets you Mexico City plates (completely legal in Jalisco - I checked), tarjeta de circulation (renewed online every year), entry into the national computer that you are the owner of this V.I.N. or plate number, six months liability only insurance. You will have to pay extra to have the T.I.P removed, up to or including the forfeit or payment of your deposit. You also have to get your annual smog permit these days. Cost of legalization by an experienced lawyer with excellent references - typically about $650 U.S. Typical cost of liability insurance for a year, about $160 U.S. per year, I think for up $100,000 U.S., which well exceeds the minimum required by Mexican law.

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I trust what Sonia says.

I see that she is still advertising her services nationalizing vehicles under her avatar,I wonder how that's going...?
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Nationalization and legalization are two different processes. The conditions are very different also.

If you plan to drive the vehicle to Baja, Quintana Roo, or out of the country then you need to legalize the vehicle, pay taxes at the border, and obtain a pedimento at the border.

If you intend to only drive within the other Mexican states, then you can nationalize the vehicle locally. You can obtain Mexican liability insurance for either a nationalized or legalized vehicle but you cannot obtain full-coverage insurance for a nationalized vehicle. The cost difference between the two processes is significant. The window to nationalize or legalize vehicles closes periodically so your deposit may be in suspension until the window opens again.

Talk to a lawyer who knows the difference. Selling a nationalized vehicle in Mexico is complicated. Those were the laws and regulations a couple of months ago, as always, in regards to today, things may have changed again.

,

" If you plan to drive the vehicle to Baja, Quintana Roo, or out of the country then you need to legalize the vehicle, pay taxes at the border, and obtain a pedimento at the border. "

For foreign plated cars, operated by foreign drivers, these claims are completely opposite of years of the Ley Aduanera and the opposite of years of the Mexican Governments published webpage information, opposite on Quintana Roo. opposite on the Baja Caifornia's, and opposite on driving out of Mexico.

No taxes owed nor paid. no pedimentos. no legalizing.

Totally OK to drive the vehicle out of Mexico without any legalizing

Official Free Zone areas and states of Mexico:

"Región fronteriza

Los estados de Baja California, Baja California Sur, Quintana Roo y la región parcial de Sonora; la franja fronteriza sur colindante con Guatemala y los municipios de Caborca, Sonora, Comitán de Domínguez, Chiapas, y Salina Cruz, Oaxaca." *

Both Baja California states and Quintana Roo have been designated special free zones, where NO permits nor pedimentos are needed for foreigners to bring in their foreign plated vehicles, and to drive them inside those special states. The only legal requirements are that

  • The foreign plated vehicle maintain current registration and current plates from their home countries, and
  • The foreign plated vehicle must be insured.

Check out the official SAT and Aduana websites for details.

* http://www.sat.gob.mx/aduanas/pasajeros/Paginas/Franja_region_fronteriza.aspx

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I am referencing a previously foreign plated car that has been nationalized in Mexico and now has Edo Mexico plates. I am not referencing a current "foreign plated" vehicle. I think there is some confusion here. Nationalized and legalized are two different terms. You can take a legalized car in and out of the country because the import taxes were paid.

Yes you are correct that a foreign plated vehicle with a TVIP can be driven anywhere and returned to Mexico provided you have a current TVIP.

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I've been waiting since Nov 2014 to nationialize a 2003 Trailblazer , Canadian plated. Used a highly recommended Manzanillo based facilitator. Paid a sizeable deposit. Received updates for the first 4 months referencing the process which of course we all know had come to a screeching halt. Now he has disappeared. Reality has replaced the eternal optimism. Deposit is gone, lesson learned. We do not fault anyone, including ourselves. It is what it is. The absolute most important piece of advice is to read and re- read RV Gringo posts. Take your car NOB , make it a holiday trip, sell the car, maybe a bit of a loss , come back to Mexico and buy a Mexican car. My opinion: Those in the facilitating business should not continue to advertise " nationization " any more. These crazy, grey area, possibly shady Solutions we keep reading about are a total waste of time other than the web board entertainment value but should come with a disclaimer.

What would be helpful to all of us in this situation would be suggestions of where to buy a good used car in Manzanillo , PV or Guadalajara .

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For me, it all boils down to what Mexicans learned a long time ago and practice on a daily basis - Adapt or Die. Pounding Bibles and Law books which are mostly full of wishful thinking and lofty aspirations as to how others should live their lives, is useless. It's admirable to aspire to a higher calling, or extremely annoying to listen to, your choice. If you just need a vehicle to get around locally, and wisely choose buses/taxis/uber cars for anything of a longer distance, including even Guadalajara, you will have no problem whatsoever. As I have mentioned before, it is a bit of a joke among local Mexicans that you will not be stopped for the reason of having foreign plates or Mexico State/City plates. Foreigners are a protected species, at least here at Lakeside. You should definitely carry liability insurance - that's a law which makes sense. You should definitely have smog check, it is not only the law but Mother Nature will give you a big, smacking kiss on your cheek. You should make sure you have the best medical coverage you can afford, auto accidents can become expensive, with long term consequences.

Things change, and they are changing right now. Less than four years ago the Mexican government couldn't care less what car I drove, or where it was from, as long as I didn't become an immigrant. Three years later you are forced to become an immigrant.

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I see that she is still advertising her services nationalizing vehicles under her avatar,I wonder how that's going...?

I believe she has reported on that recently. If you need to know, just ask her, as she is always been up front, IMO.

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Maybe I misunderstood your post,it's not a joke in Guadalajara,I've been stopped a few times due to the foreign plates.

How do you get liability insurance if your vehicle is in the country illegally?

Oops screwed up on the quote function..again.

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How do you get liability insurance if your vehicle is in the country illegally?

Anybody can get Mexican liability insurance that covers them in foreign plated vehicles regardless of its ownership. It is called a Driver's License policy and I get mine with 500,000 USD limit per accident for $131 USD a year from MexPro.

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From your location the answer would be found in Herod's Law, te xxxxx o jodes. Answer, as you know, is you can't!

HaHa!

I guess you saw the movie.

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