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Lots of info about Mexican Medical System....I have never heard of anyone moving to Canada to avail themselves of that "free" medical system..(I know it is not "free")

But can some one enlightening the rest of us..What if we move north, are we covered?

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This topic has nothing at all to do with Mexico, nor Guadalajara, Chapala or Ajijic. Probably why there is little info here about the Canadian health system.

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Canada requires a medical exam and security screen for a temporary or permanent resident and every member of the family. A medical problem will be decided by a board who weighs up cost/benefits. http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/medic/admiss/index.asp

An inside joke for you - one of the approved Doctors asks you to remove your shoes and socks, and then carefully exams between your toes. No one can figure out why!

Canada is targeting 300,000 immigrants per year and is determined to recruit the most qualified the world has to offer as well as honoring it's international agreements to accept genuine refugees. Economic refuges are not an option. Retirement category is not an option (it does not exist).

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/volpe-aiming-for-300-000-immigrants-a-year-1.544604

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Lots of info about Mexican Medical System....I have never heard of anyone moving to Canada to avail themselves of that "free" medical system..(I know it is not "free")

But can some one enlightening the rest of us..What if we move north, are we covered?

If you are accepted as a true immigrant to Canada, health care is not an option, it is a requirement. You don't have a choice NOT to have it.

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There is no "Canadian" Medical System - just some guidelines that each of the Provinces must follow. The Provinces set up and administer their own Health Systems and there are a few differences from Province-to-Province. For example, the Province of Ontario's Health System is called OHIP (Ontario Health Insurance Plan). If immigrating to Ontario, there is a 3 month waiting period from the date of entry before you obtain free access to medical care, even if you are already a Canadian citizen and move there from another Province or return from out of the country for more than 6 months.

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As Ezzie said, there are slight differences between provinces, so I would suggest that you look at the individual provincial health websites. Although you may pay for medications, price reductions may apply to seniors or those on social assistance, required medical procedures for the most part are at no cost (heart surgery, hospital stay, births, etc). Of course after you qualify. You can obtain additional health insurance thru Blue Cross or similar companies which would cover a portion of your dental, medications, eye glasses. Research, research, research so you know what you are or are not eligible for.

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If you are accepted as a true immigrant to Canada, health care is not an option, it is a requirement. You don't have a choice NOT to have it.

One is not required to use government-sponsored health care. There are many options for paid care. Granted, not as many as in the U.S., but then we haven't needed them for a long time. When my wife was diagnosed with cancer, she was in to the system faster than you could blink, MRIs, best specialists, etc.

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There is no "Canadian" Medical System - just some guidelines that each of the Provinces must follow. The Provinces set up and administer their own Health Systems and there are a few differences from Province-to-Province. For example, the Province of Ontario's Health System is called OHIP (Ontario Health Insurance Plan). If immigrating to Ontario, there is a 3 month waiting period from the date of entry before you obtain free access to medical care, even if you are already a Canadian citizen and move there from another Province or return from out of the country for more than 6 months.

The 3-month wait is standard across the country-- if you move from one province to another, the previous province covers you until the new coverage kicks in.

Coming in from outside the country, whether as a citizen or immigrant, one can and should purchase private insurance for the waiting period.

In our experience, it is remarkably inexpensive. We brought my wife's then 92-year-old grandmother, who had been living in the US for years, back to Canada to live with us after she fell and broke a hip. We held our breath when we inquired about private insurance. We were surprised at how little it cost. That was almost 25 years ago, but my recollection is something like a couple of hundred dollars. We had a similar experience when we returned home 8 years ago after living overseas for several years. Again, only a few hundred dollars. However, in the interest of full disclosure, I recall nothing about any exclusions, deductibles, etc. Also, the coverage didn't include prescription drugs. Fortunately, we had a drug plan with my wife's pension that kicked in as soon as we crossed the border. In any case, I think all provinces cover most, if not all drugs for anyone over 65.

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In Ontario, over the age of 65, it's about 6 bucks per scrip, after a $100 yearl deductible. There is a second program called Trillium that relates your yearly drug cost to 4% of your total household income, although I am unclear on who qualifies.

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In " la belle province " Québec, it is la régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec, we call it la carte soleil, if you are a snowbird you must not be out of Québec ( meaning other provinces or territory as well ) more than 183 days excluding your departure and return days.

Once I spoke with a nice lady from the province of Alberta who said that their province system allowed them up to 8 or 9 months out ?

And I heard that in Ontario it could be up to 7 months, but maybe someone from Ontario could confirm that !

There is no free steak in this world, meaning that in any provinces or territory in Canada, you pay for the services you receive, the federal government gets it thru your yearly taxes, and if your from La belle province...you have the province income tax and also the federal income tax every year

Then you must find yourself a familly practitionner ( not every Québec resident has one ) or go to a no appointment clinic, be there early, register, you get an approximate time to come back and see a doctor.

Once you manage to find a familly practitionner, at least you'll be able to plan for yearly check-up! ??

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If you are accepted as a true immigrant to Canada, health care is not an option, it is a requirement. You don't have a choice NOT to have it.

I'm curious: does this mean it's a bad thing?

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I have "heard" third hand, that "some" Canadians who have had medical procedures, surgery etc., carried out at Lakeside/ Guadalajara ,paid for them and then have been reimbursed by their respective provinces ..so I guess my question is , if this is true, why the anxiety for foreign travel and obtaining separate medical coverage???

When I discuss this issue with some of my Canadian friends their answer seems "Yes but", but I never get a clear answer!

If we think there are some anomalies in the Mexican system, IMSS / SP, the Canadian system also seems to be very murky

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I have "heard" third hand, that "some" Canadians who have had medical procedures, surgery etc., carried out at Lakeside/ Guadalajara ,paid for them and then have been reimbursed by their respective provinces ..so I guess my question is , if this is true, why the anxiety for foreign travel and obtaining separate medical coverage???

When I discuss this issue with some of my Canadian friends their answer seems "Yes but", but I never get a clear answer!

If we think there are some anomalies in the Mexican system, IMSS / SP, the Canadian system also seems to be very murky

It depends on whether you're a snowbird or a full time resident here. If you're a full time resident in Mexico, you are NOT entitled to use the Canadian Medical System in any way, shape or form...BUT, if you choose to go back to living "full" time in Canada then you can make application on your permanent return and three months later your medical privileges will be reinstated. People who do otherwise are committing fraud because Canadian Health Care is for those who have permanent residences in Canada.

Yes, if you're a snowbird, you may either be reimbursed by your provincial health care OR you may deduct as a medical expense on your income tax return and recover some of it. The catch with these options is that you pay out of pocket for the procedure first and then try and get your money back. Many people simply do not have the money to do this.

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It depends on whether you're a snowbird or a full time resident here. If you're a full time resident in Mexico, you are NOT entitled to use the Canadian Medical System in any way, shape or form...BUT, if you choose to go back to living "full" time in Canada then you can make application on your permanent return and three months later your medical privileges will be reinstated. People who do otherwise are committing fraud because Canadian Health Care is for those who have permanent residences in Canada.

Yes, if you're a snowbird, you may either be reimbursed by your provincial health care OR you may deduct as a medical expense on your income tax return and recover some of it. The catch with these options is that you pay out of pocket for the procedure first and then try and get your money back. Many people simply do not have the money to do this.

The Snowbird couple I vist every year in Puerto Vallarta from Manitoba buy from their provincial government´s heath care plan a 3 month travel policy, that is the limit allowed per 12 month period, for a few hundred dollars Canadian each and go back after 3 months every year. As you mentioned they would get reimbursed. They mentioned without having this policy they would be paying out of pocket for any needed health care while there.

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The Snowbird couple I vist every year in Puerto Vallarta from Manitoba buy from their provincial government´s heath care plan a 3 month travel policy, that is the limit allowed per 12 month period, for a few hundred dollars Canadian each and go back after 3 months every year. As you mentioned they would get reinbursed. They mentioned without having this policy they would be paying out of pocket for any needed health care while there.

That's a good deal for Manitoba snowbirds.

Any other provinces that have this delightful perk?

Too bad it's only for three months...if I lived in Manitoba, I'd want to be where it's warm for at least six months.

I know someone from B.C. who came down here just to have her gall bladder removed because the waiting list for her elective surgery was too long. She dutifully filled out all the paper work...included a whopping great 1/2 inch diameter stone in the envelope...and was fully reimbursed.

Some things can take forever to get done in Canada...but if it's an emergency, your A$$ is covered.

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Why would you assume its a moral issue?? I cannot answer this for you.

Who said anything about morals? My question to you is to qualify your statement "You don't have a choice NOT to have it." Correct me if I'm wrong, but this seems to be worded in a provocative way, as if there is actually something wrong about having socialised healthcare. Do you think there is something wrong with it?

I here many, many people bemoaning the lack of a single-payer healthcare system, with the high, high costs involved in private care. And yet here we have a country where most of it is provided via taxation, and you seem to be bemoaning the opposite. My question is most definitely serious, and not meant to be frivolous in any way.

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One is not required to use government-sponsored health care. There are many options for paid care. Granted, not as many as in the U.S., but then we haven't needed them for a long time. When my wife was diagnosed with cancer, she was in to the system faster than you could blink, MRIs, best specialists, etc.

I am not sure what are you talking about CG, In BC/Canada (that's where we live most of the time) is only one option and that is a socialized medicine. There aren't any private clinics or private insurances. As the mater of fact it is illegal to practice privately. Unfortunately, you as a patient have only one choice. You cannot "buy" time (jump the cue) or have a choice of a doctor for any money (legally). It would be really good to have a choice. If you are in emergency situation you'll be taken care of right away but if you need a hip replacement you will have to wait your turn. I was waiting for a "specialist" for 2 years (non emergency) before he called me for an appointment. I had the issue solved Lakeside right away. Mine point (and complain) Is that you do not have choice, You cannot even (easily) change your doctor. Canadians (at least in BC are so paranoid about the 2 tier system that it is not even funny. There is a so called private clinic in Vancouver but I do not think the doctors there are called doctors (even though they are.) So we could register with them for a price....but traveling to Vancouver for appointments is not an option for us.

Cheers.

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No, I'm really not sure what you are talking about. Just do a very quick Google and you will find all kinds of private healthcare. There has never been an instant of time when there wasn't. Look at the very first result of a quick search for "private medicine in ontario": Five of Toronto's most exclusive private clinics: http://www.torontolife.com/style/health-and-beauty/2014/02/26/best-private-medical-clinics-toronto/

Look at the next: hundreds. http://www.findprivateclinics.ca/Ontario/lc-9-0.html

We are not discussing the ups and downs of public healthcare.

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I don't know which province you are from, but in Québec, doctors are free to opt out of the public system completely. They can then no longer bill the government, they bill the patients directly. The number of such private doctors seems to be increasing lately, fueled by frustration with the lack of resources in the public system.

If you do get medical treatment outside the country, yes you can be reimbursed. The rate however, is based on the price normally paid to professionals in Québec. Which means that you will be stuck paying the difference, which might be ruinous in the U.S., but not so bad in Mexico.

Pete

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In Ontario, over the age of 65, it's about 6 bucks per scrip, after a $100 yearl deductible. There is a second program called Trillium that relates your yearly drug cost to 4% of your total household income, although I am unclear on who qualifies.

Was that a year? or yearl? Computer Guy?

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I am not sure what are you talking about CG, In BC/Canada (that's where we live most of the time) is only one option and that is a socialized medicine. There aren't any private clinics or private insurances. As the mater of fact it is illegal to practice privately. Unfortunately, you as a patient have only one choice. You cannot "buy" time (jump the cue) or have a choice of a doctor for any money (legally). It would be really good to have a choice. If you are in emergency situation you'll be taken care of right away but if you need a hip replacement you will have to wait your turn. I was waiting for a "specialist" for 2 years (non emergency) before he called me for an appointment. I had the issue solved Lakeside right away. Mine point (and complain) Is that you do not have choice, You cannot even (easily) change your doctor. Canadians (at least in BC are so paranoid about the 2 tier system that it is not even funny. There is a so called private clinic in Vancouver but I do not think the doctors there are called doctors (even though they are.) So we could register with them for a price....but traveling to Vancouver for appointments is not an option for us.

Cheers.

Deleted. Posting problems

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There are all kinds of private health care clinics in BC where you can jump the cue if you want to.

http://www.cambiesurgery.com/

http://www.findprivateclinics.ca/British_Columbia/lc-2-0.html

The list goes on and on.

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