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John Shrall

Anyone Know a Place That Has Southern Greens?

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An order for greens (collard, mustard & turnip) from the organic market needed to accompany a traditional Southern fried chicken dinner this weekend fell through. Bugs got the best of the crop. We got plenty of kale and a little collard but not enough to do justice to all the bacon needed to make the dish authentic.

I know it's a longshot but does anyone know another place might have any of these greens?

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Collards aren‘t all that tasty unless they have been touched by frost. Unlikely here, but your freezer can come close, once you find some.

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Super lake had them in cans. However I have grown them here. Which I proved can be done.There is a worm problem. In the states there is an organic (stuff) I can't remember but Google will help. My opinion is the organic fadis a rip off. I am from the south and always raised my own. I will bring seeds with my next trip to the states. I love them greens. Good luck.

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Dena at the Tuesday Organic market often has GA Collard greens for sale. They are small and tender but tasty.

Valerie :)

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I have found turnip greens in Abastos.

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Collard greens are a type of amaranth. There are three categories of amaranth, one best as grain, one best as leaves, one best as ornamental. In the Caribbean the collard greens are known as Callaloo. It is very good for you, and contains protein. Amaranth is an ancient grain in Mexico. It was banned by the Conquistadors because they banned and burned amaranth because they saw the Aztecs sculpting pagan figures using blood, mashed corn and amaranth. It still has pagan roots in Mexico, around the Day of the Dead people make wonderful amaranth cookies using honey and dried fruit. They are called "Allegria" - which is a wonderful word to learn because it means JOY.

These are some of the heritage amaranth plants which should grow very well here. Once they are growing, they need very little water. They could be growing on the vacant lots - one acre of amaranth produces 1,000 lbs. of grain. Ironically, these heritage seeds cannot be shipped to Mexico. Mexico has started a policy of xraying all packages into Mexico - which kills a lot of live seeds. I expect a work around shortly, but that's the way it is now. I guess Aduana would rather read a good book, and xray everything, rather than actually open and hand inspect packages!

http://shop.nativeseeds.org/collections/amaranth

Amaranth - an extremely useful plant. Even one variety for bad neighbors!

https://www.google.com/search?q=amaranthus+elephant+head&biw=1264&bih=880&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0CB0QsARqFQoTCLrJjPKoi8cCFQqmHgod5ZUKIg

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Try Verdolagas, aka Purslane. They are sold all over the place and they are delicious. Look for a bunch that is nice and fresh, if the leaves fall off when you pick it up it isn't fresh. Cut off the root ends and the largest stalks, cook the leaves and smaller stalks like you would cook collards or turnips. They don't need to cook very long.

Sometimes when you buy them they will still have the root attached and you can plant them in a pot.

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