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I understand that Aduana stopped importing Canadian cars in September and the current impossible requirement of a US export permit makes it currently impossible.

Question? Would a letter from Aduana stating the above facts provide any defence against car seizure by Federales? If so, how could such a letter be obtained for all "illegal" vehicle owners?

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Goodluck with that idea. It seems that there is little, if any interest in making it easier for retired expats to continue to drive their foreign plated cars beyond four years of temporary residency. Aduana seemst to think that, by then, those expats will have sold their vehicles on a trip north and have already settled into a “permanent lifestyle“ in Mexico and would be expected to buy a vehicle in Mexico, as would be required in most any other country much sooner than 4 years. It can be inconvenient and sometimes expensive, but Mexico‘s previous generosity in allowing temporary residents to keep their cars so long, has spoiled us all. The requirement for formal US exportation was a surprise and it also seems that Mexico simply assumed that all requests for importation would come from the USA; an error on their part, I assume.

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I don´t think a letter would be of any use if was available. In the law for Federal Police authority they are authorized to help enforce Immigration, INM, and ADUANA, Customs, laws and policies. They can detain illegal Immigrants and impound illegal vehicles or any other things illegally in Mexico.

Many people simply park their vehicles on private property to avoid any risk of getting their vehicle impounded and wait it out. Others get an ADUANA permit to return it to the border and get it out of Mexico.

Others drive it around and hope they don´t get into an accident or stopped by the Federal Police etc.

If I had a Residente Permanente visa/card I would park it or remove it and possibly find a long term parking lot along the border in the US and wait it out and if it isn´t able to be imported continue from the border in the US and drive it to Canada and dispose of it there.

In the mean time you could buy a cheap Mexican used car to use.

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Sonia says she can import Canadian cars 2009 or older, but that it takes a long time.

Every legal system that I know of cannot force a citizen to break a law in order to comply with another one. One, or both of the laws have to go. A slam dunk amparo, I would think, BUT THEN AGAIN I AM NOT A LAWYER.

Most countries do not accept retirement category immigrants at all. The U.S.A. and Canada do not, for example. U.S.A. and Canada are trying to attract highly skilled immigrants/permanent residents in almost every sector, and also savvy businessmen. Mexico was supposed to be doing the same, but to this day have they never implemented a "points" system or a business immigration system. It's a real shame. Mexico could tug at Mexican American heart strings and the desire to raise their families with traditional cultural values and identities (or not).

There will be an amnesty or Mexico will create the largest scrap yard in the world - their choice, not mine.

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I ran across some early 1900's photographs of Ellis Island from the New York Public Library. It is one those slow, Flicker presentations, but wait until the second half of the album to see so many immigrants in their national dress. Think about what a tremendous impact this has made on U.S. culture and the economy. If Mexico continues their current policies of not inviting the world's specialists, the culture will continue to be insular and the economy dominated by monopolies. Some would say who needs diversity anyways, others would for opt for new blood, new ideas.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nypl/sets/72157610968916254/with/3109323037/

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I ran across some early 1900's photographs of Ellis Island from the New York Public Library. It is one those slow, Flicker presentations, but wait until the second half of the album to see so many immigrants in their national dress. Think about what a tremendous impact this has made on U.S. culture and the economy. If Mexico continues their current policies of not inviting the world's specialists, the culture will continue to be insular and the economy dominated by monopolies. Some would say who needs diversity anyways, others would for opt for new blood, new ideas.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nypl/sets/72157610968916254/with/3109323037/

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"if Mexico continues their current policies of not inviting the world's specialists"

This is simply not true.

INM law specifically lists and gives special treatments for incoming specialists with desirable skills, like scientists, physicists, engineers, chemists, et al.

I was offered Mexican residency by INM - for FREE - with no fiscal requirements - as a public health and chemistry expert.

We do have to provide apostilled copies of our bacalaureat, bachelors, and Doctoral transcripts.

Life really can be easier and has benefits when we know the law and use the laws.

- Getting back to the topic of the thread, there have been permanent imports of Canadian NAFTA cars by Canadians applying at the border since the changes last October. It appears that imports of both American and Canadian NAFTA cars are both still on-hold the last few months.

It would be great to hear if Sonia is actually permanently importing "2009 and older Canadian" NAFTA cars.

That would be an important breakthrough, cutting through the mis-information.

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Mexico was supposed to be doing the same, but to this day have they never implemented a "points" system or a business immigration system. It's a real shame.

That´s a common rumor. The point system has been in place since Nov. 9th. 2012 and is in part: the amount of pension income, property an applicant owns and their 12 month untouched savings balance among other considerations such as family ties, professional degrees and job offers in Mexico. Also in part is what uninterupted visa status immigrants have had in the past and what points they need to meet.

These and more "points" add up to you being admitted and getting an immigration status or not and what immigration status you are eligible to recieve and for how long and under what restrictions.

The Ley de Migración even calls these criteria the point system in determining what classification an applicant can apply for an immigration status. There are about 40 classifications.

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Mexico was supposed to be doing the same, but to this day have they never implemented a "points" system or a business immigration system. It's a real shame.

Since at least 2010, INM policy has been the opposite of this claim.

Consider Article 162 of the May 2010 INM Law:
Sexto: V. Los extranjeros que hayan obtenido la calidad migratoria de Inmigrante, dentro las características de rentista, inversionista, profesional, cargo de confianza, científico, técnico, familiar, artista y deportista o asimilados, se equipararán al Residente temporal,

This roughly translates:
V. Foreigners who have obtained the immigration status of “Inmigrante” (the old FM2), who meet the characteristics of Financier, investor, professional position of trust, scientific experts, technical experts, family members, artists, sports athletes or similar, be equated to Temporary Resident status. "

So, foreigners who are trusted business professionals, scientists, investors, and technical experts have been officially welcomed, and granted Mexican residency since 2010. ... beyond the points system details.

INM does have special requirements for people who want to apply under the special qualifications that Mexico desires, including apostilled & officially-translated transcripts and certifications.

INM does not get a lot of these special applications, so an INM clerk may not be aware of them.

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There is a very big difference between accommodating immigrants who want to live in Mexico and to actively pursue and recruit well qualified candidates with slogans, along the lines, for example "Come live and invest in Mexico, a quickly growing economy and a vibrant, family orientated culture." Canada, the U.S.A. and Australia are examples of countries actively recruiting new immigrants. They sponsor job fairs, pay for advertising, and actually have whole government departments dedicated to this purpose They have become very good at it. I have met many Mexican American business people who have returned to invest in Mexico so they might regain a family orientated life, they felt was disappearing while living in the U.S.A.

A little misleading in your own personal example - YOU WROTE (not the investigations of my highly trained team of private detectives) that they finally agreed to class you as a scientist, but that you were prohibited from working for two years, when your Mexican wife would then qualify you as an immigrant.

As far as Sonia reporting to you about Canadian car importing - I seriously doubt that will ever happen. Maybe it's just as easy as continuing to import as she always has - except Canadian cars do not need U.S.A. export permits.

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There is a very big difference between accommodating immigrants who want to live in Mexico and to actively pursue and recruit well qualified candidates with slogans, along the lines, for example "Come live and invest in Mexico, a quickly growing economy and a vibrant, family orientated culture." Canada, the U.S.A. and Australia are examples of countries actively recruiting new immigrants. They sponsor job fairs, pay for advertising, and actually have whole government departments dedicated to this purpose They have become very good at it. I have met many Mexican American business people who have returned to invest in Mexico so they might regain a family orientated life, they felt was disappearing while living in the U.S.A.

A little misleading in your own personal example - YOU WROTE (not the investigations of my highly trained team of private detectives) that they finally agreed to class you as a scientist, but that you were prohibited from working for two years, when your Mexican wife would then qualify you as an immigrant.

As far as Sonia reporting to you about Canadian car importing - I seriously doubt that will ever happen. Maybe it's just as easy as continuing to import as she always has - except Canadian cars do not need U.S.A. export permits.

"A little misleading in your own personal example ... that they finally agreed to class you as a scientist, but that you were prohibited from working for two years ..."

Just like your other mistaken claims, there is no truth in this one.

You're confused, thinking I am someone else.

I started as visitante/tourista the first year, then 2 years as FM3, and 2 years as Inmigrante.

.

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"As far as Sonia reporting to you about Canadian car importing - "

You're confused, misreporting facts again, on this too. Sonia never reported anything to me.

Please read your own posts (Chillin). It's you who announced in this thread that Sonia is permanently importing Canadian cars. but now you're contradicting yourself (?) Here's your earlier post.

Sonia says she can import Canadian cars 2009 or older, but that it takes a long time.

Every legal system that I know of cannot force a citizen to break a law in order to comply with another one. One, or both of the laws have to go. A slam dunk amparo, I would think, BUT THEN AGAIN I AM NOT A LAWYER. ...

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To clear up some of the confusion, and getting back to the topic of this thread, Sonia has not reported anything to me, but she has made this good post on another chapala . com "Legalizing" versus "Nationalizing" thread earlier today at 2:00 PM that addresses part of this topic:

Gatita it appears you have a foreign plated vehicle and to make it legal, the process I use is nationalizing. It has to be 2009 or older and NAFTA made, registered in the US or Canada. Process is very slow and once started under the control of Aduana.

The car i wrote about is a Mexican car with plates from the countryside just outside of Mexico City and wanting to be registered in Guanajuato state. Those plates have to be returned to the state from which they originate. My sister has been trying to do so for 2 days and still not done.

saludos

Sonia

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I don't know the details, but I think Sonia's "nationalizing" might be different from permanent imports which are described at http://www.dof.gob.mx/nota_detalle.php?codigo=5388005&fecha=07/04/2015

using the Aduana tramite process that gets the car owner an official pedimento, but only Sonia can tell us exactly what her process is. Ask Sonia.

In the SAT government link, search for " Tramitar el pedimento de importación definitiva" .

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To clear up some of the confusion,

You seem to suffer from some draughty synapses here.

I implied that Sonia would not respond to you because that only opens the door to additional annoyment and aggravation.

You also seem to forget posting that "professional" scientists immigrating to Mexico were to be unpaid, as you were! Don't let the word get out to University of Guadalajara!

Regarding "Profesional": I'm officially a professional scientist in INM's lingo, working as an unpaid scientist for several University research groups, and I am categorized as "Inmigrante Cientifico" = working professional but not permitted to receive pay for my professional activities.

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You seem to suffer from some draughty synapses here.

I implied that Sonia would not respond to you because that only opens the door to additional annoyment and aggravation.

You also seem to forget posting that "professional" scientists immigrating to Mexico were to be unpaid, as you were! Don't let the word get out to University of Guadalajara!

.

Let's keep things factual.

Please stop making up fantasies, fictions, and falsehoods that criticize Mexican government policies, and

stop your obsessions & fictions you're making up about who you think I might be.

I have never had any kind of relationship with the University of Guadalajara.

INM has officially welcomed professional experts, scientists, talented businessmen and investors et al since at least 2010.

Some Canadians have driven their cars to the US Mexico border and permanently imported them last Nov - January.

Canadian and US citizens have not been able to permanently import (importación definitiva con pedimento) their used NAFTA cars since then, according to regular reports from the border.

Sonia has just posted that she is able to nationalize "2009 or older and NAFTA made, registered in the US or Canada. Process is very slow and once started under the control of Aduana."

.

More Chillin fictions:

"You also seem to forget posting that "professional" scientists immigrating to Mexico were to be unpaid, as you were!

Don't let the word get out to University of Guadalajara!."

These are total fictions made up by Chillin, with no basis in fact.

When INM offered me a residency card for free, as a public health & chemistry scientist, they did not restrict me from working for pay. Chillin may know some mystery person who had this restriction, but their personal business is not mine.

Again, I have never had any connection with the University of Guadalajara, and don't even know anyone from that university.

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Regarding "Profesional": I'm officially a professional scientist in INM's lingo, working as an unpaid scientist for several University research groups, and I am categorized as "Inmigrante Cientifico" = working professional but not permitted to receive pay for my professional activities. (legal Govt. Spanish terminology vs. common translations).

steve

http://www.mexconnect.com/cgi-bin/forums/gforum.cgi?post=165332

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