Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Regularization of cars and options for Permanent Residents


Intercasa

Recommended Posts

There so many misconceptions in RV's post I don't know where, or if I want to, begin. I do know if you repeat something over and over again that you will begin to believe, and no one can change that.

Canada allows immigrants to bring their vehicles- permanently. U.S.A. allows one year, strictly enforced. This harks back to the practicalities of bringing a houseful of goods/children/pets, to a new destination, which will immediately require a vehicle to get to work, find housing, find schooling etc. It is the civilized way to do things and wise considering the government will be milking the new immigrant's wallet for many years to come.

The mistake the Mexican government made, in my opinion, was unilaterally declaring that pensioners and retired people must become immigrants after a time period. They misunderstood that for many people, keeping their home ties and pride of nationality is extremely important. For many, immigration to Mexico, although forced, is somehow betraying their country. Maybe this is stronger among older generations and those who served in the military. For them, this is about something way deeper than a d@#m car. Then there are those couldn't be happier to rid themselves of what they consider to be the the evil regimes of Canada and the U.S.A., and those "regimes" couldn't be happier to see them go.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Sonia. There is a very significant flow of used cars from the US into Canada. As long as the car is on the RIV list (having been sold as new vehicles on both sides of the border) it is a relatively simple task to import it into Canada after it is legally "exported" from the US. Some vehicles require updates to the Dept. of Transport rules (such as daytime running lights if they are not already on the car) but they can be registered without paying huge sums to brokers and Customs. And if a vehicle is over 15 yrs, old - it can be imported from anywhere in the world without the need to update to the Canadian safety standards. I have personally imported a few Japanese cars (right hand drive) that were over 15 yrs, old into Canada.

Mexico's used vehicle importation laws are just plain unfair and fly in violation of the NAFTA Agreement (as well as many other things) but who is going to spend the time or $$$ to challenge it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

.

The mistake the Mexican government made, in my opinion, was unilaterally declaring that pensioners and retired people must become immigrants after a time period. They misunderstood that for many people, keeping their home ties and pride of nationality is extremely important. For many, immigration to Mexico, although forced, is somehow betraying their country. Maybe this is stronger among older generations and those who served in the military.

What does getting a Permanente visa have to do with keeping "home ties and pride of nationality"???

Link to post
Share on other sites
Then, there are the importations of used vehicles by individuals and/or small used car dealerships. Those seem to have stopped....

This is all quite correct and understandable.

Noting cbviajero's correct observation that the latter in your first sentence are by far the greatest importers, I am not sure how you arrive at the conclusion in the final sentence quoted above. It is correct for government to favor one group of Mexican businesses, the big new car dealers, over the other, individual Mexican entrepreneurs and small dealerships?

How does it serve the public to force them to go without or pay inflated prices to protected "dealers" who don't deal at all? There's a real shortage in this country of decent and affordable used cars that haven't been beaten to death on the roads here.

cbviajero is very correct in noting that the expats don't amount to a hill of beans in this situation. It is the small Mexican businesses that are being shafted by this clear violation of NAFTA in favor of the rich and corrupt who basically own and run this country, and the one NOB for that matter, lock stock and barrel.

I'd hardly describe that as "correct" though it certainly is understandable. The ruling oligarchs really have no limits to their greed.

Since in reality, it is Mexican small business and Mexican consumers who are getting harmed by their own government, I doubt that anyone NOB is going to fight the Mexican government over a clear violation of NAFTA. They're also being sued by corn syrup producers NOB but those are the big boys who have the legal and financial muscle to fight that violation of NAFTA.

I might also add that when we moved here 7 years ago, there was a clearly stated policy of the Mexican government to encourage folks like us to live here, spend money with Mexican businesses and hire Mexican people who are easily the most needy for employment.

They weren't doing US a favor RV, we were and are doing THEM a favor by creating opportunity at home so maybe at least a few of those folks wouldn't feel the need to risk life and limb to leave the country to find work. What you describe as a "favor" was a smart and logical incentive for people to come, bring outside income and spend it here on goods and services.

But no more.

The countries that aren't so smart are the ones who throw up these artificial disincentives to foreign residents for no other apparent reason than to hassle people and throw their bureaucratic weight around. I can't imagine why anyone would think that Mexico in doing likewise is doing anyone a favor.

I agree with Chillin: Why does government give a darn whether we become "permanent" residents or simply renew our visas annually except to discourage us from coming or staying. As cbviajero also noted, our vehicles are truly insignificant in the context of the overall trade picture, why take away an incentive that costs little but really encouraged retirees to come here and spend their money?

Penny wise and pound foolish? Or just obsessed with control and domination regardless of the consequences?

This whole deal reminds me of this:

https://youtu.be/2wtbQUaC9mE

BTW I'm a permanent resident and I drive a Mexican plated car bought here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have personally imported a few Japanese cars (right hand drive) that were over 15 yrs, old into Canada.

Ezzie - your most made me laugh .Imported RHD and unusual vehicles are all the rage right now in the U.S.A right now - especially old diesels which can burn used frying oil. The famous blogger said he gets more attention driving his Nissan Skyliner GT than when he had a Ferrari. Of course the Skyliner legend is all about tuning it into a 1,000 HP rocket - but there you go.

http://jalopnik.com/my-nissan-skyline-gt-r-attracts-more-attention-than-any-1708777862

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yah - I brought one of those in which my son still has up in Canada. It is a 1995 (BNR32) but it only has a modest 600 HP or so - I wouldn't even think about getting that one into Mexico!! I also imported a Suzuki Escudo 2.0 ltr. Turbo Diesel (SV420D) and transferred all of the bits into a Sidekick chassis I already had. That is the vehicle I currently am driving here in Mexico on a TIP. It has been a great vehicle for here but sadly it soon has to leave the county.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...