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For Those Who Think A Flood Of Affluent American Retirees Is Coming

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The Ecuadoran govt. has recently changed their rules, forcing their current foreigners in Ecuador to prove Spanish fluency, or surrender their residency and leave.

Ha! If they did that here, there would definitely be a flood…in the opposite direction.

Is that for real? Did Ecuador really do that?

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According to a German news report: Ecuador has recently become a lot less welcoming to Canadians, Americans, Germans, and Brits who don't speak Spanish.

The Ecuadoran govt. has recently changed their rules, forcing their current foreigners in Ecuador to prove Spanish fluency, or surrender their residency and leave. This has only happened in recent months, so many past positive internet comments about Ecuador as a retirement destination, are soon to be out-of-date, with it becoming difficult for non-Spanish speakers to stay in Ecuador.

https://southofzero.wordpress.com/2015/01/13/why-are-so-many-expats-leaving-ecuador/

http://gringosabroad.com/ecuador/spanish-residency-requirement-ecuador/

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Thanks for those articles. A con, a scam, a rumour. So who would start that? No money in it.

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More likely scenario - you just got sucker punched by the C.I.A.

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/after-more-50-years-usaid-leaving-ecuador-n215621

Chillin, Did you read the article you quote about President Rafael Correa kicking out German agencies, and US army troops, and kicking out USAID?

USAID has a mediocre to poor reputation around the world for making tons of promises that they do not follow through-on - and with the US military expanding out into 75% of the world's countries, sending special forces into 81 countries already in 2015, it's understandable that socialist countries are not welcoming US military boots-on-the-ground.

According to Chillin's article, President Correa - a staunch socialist - has also kicked out German aid agencies for supporting opposition political parties.

I can't figure how what President Correa's expelling German aid agencies have to do with some Chillin imagined "CIA sucker punch" to me ?

Also, what does Ecuador's immigration agency adding new Spanish language requirements for ALL foreigners, have to do with Chillin's ideas that the CIA "sucker punched" me?

Ecuadoran officials reported on the German news report that: They believed foreigners who want to stay as residents of Ecuador should be able to speak Spanish to be valued contributors to Ecuadoran society. This view mirrors some past discussions on chapala . com about how foreigners who do not speak Spanish seem to have a lot more problems and misunderstandings here than expats who speak some Spanish,

.

In any case, the point of Sonia's post and my post is that Mexico's government has set some reasonable standards for foreigners to stay in Mexico, making Mexican residency easier than many other countries, especially by welcoming foreigners who don't speak Spanish.

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Frankly, I do not foresee a flood or retirees setting up households in Mexico. I keep getting e mail warnings that US government will soon nationalize retirement accounts and seize bank accounts. I know they are just trying to sell gold or silver or something else, but still it scares me.

Mexico is a nice place to live, but it is no place to be poor. No nation, no matter what it says on the statue of Liberty, wants poor people. What will happen when and if the government does take these actions? What retired person can live without their pension checks and social security?

And such a large per centage of the US population is dependent upon food stamps, extended unemployment payments and other transfer payments, what will happen when and if the government cannot or will not continue these payments? These people will not be denied.

It worries me. The government and the news media say things are better, but the line at the DES office is getting longer.

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Frankly, I do not foresee a flood or retirees setting up households in Mexico. I keep getting e mail warnings that US government will soon nationalize retirement accounts and seize bank accounts. I know they are just trying to sell gold or silver or something else, but still it scares me.

Mexico is a nice place to live, but it is no place to be poor. No nation, no matter what it says on the statue of Liberty, wants poor people. What will happen when and if the government does take these actions? What retired person can live without their pension checks and social security?

And such a large per centage of the US population is dependent upon food stamps, extended unemployment payments and other transfer payments, what will happen when and if the government cannot or will not continue these payments? These people will not be denied.

It worries me. The government and the news media say things are better, but the line at the DES office is getting longer.

Turn off Fox News and the other radio talk show hosts and you will not be scared anymore. IMO

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/05/ex-reagan-adviser-fox-news-is-self-brainwashing-republicans-into-a-radical-fringe-party/

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I think anyone who can hear and learn a foreign language at an advanced age should feel very lucky. It is very easy to lecture others about learning Spanish, it is not so easy to do so with the limitations imposed by poor hearing and the simple loss of learning ability with age. I have worked at learning Spanish for 7 years and can communicate at a basic level but cannot decipher what most Spanish speaker say as it comes too rapidly and often too softly. Even powerful hearing aids don't help much.

I've come to terms with the likelihood I'll never be really fluent. That wasn't my goal when we came but it appears I'll have to settle for that. That is pretty disappointing to me.

I can't speak for Ecuador but here expats make a very significant contribution in supporting local businesses, participating and funding local charities and employing people and treating them better than is the norm here. We are not a bunch of free loaders, quite the contrary. I notice that on a person to person level, almost everyone here is happy to work with our limitations.

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Turn off Fox News and the other radio talk show hosts and you will not be scared anymore. IMO

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/05/ex-reagan-adviser-fox-news-is-self-brainwashing-republicans-into-a-radical-fringe-party/

Your bias is showing. It is hardly just one news outlet or talk show hosts who have been sensationalizing the troubles in Mexico.

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You are all wrong. There will now be a new flood of folks into Mexico from Texas, as the waters rise and spill over the border.

On the more political side; all the reds are now running for POTUS but none will vote for the other. So, we are safe from the falling sky scenario as told by Rufus.

Pobrecito, que tu no entiendes el español. Que lastima, Sr. Coon.

Where did that cat go, by the way? He was absent for awhile, or had morphed into Darth Vader.

OK. Who is counting? Are newbies replacing those of us who have faded away or died? Or, is the number of expats seriously declining? I know of several new arrivals, as well as “departees“, but have not been counting.

Wish I were there.....101F is predicted later this week in Tucson.

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I think anyone who can hear and learn a foreign language at an advanced age should feel very lucky. It is very easy to lecture others about learning Spanish, it is not so easy to do so with the limitations imposed by poor hearing and the simple loss of learning ability with age. I have worked at learning Spanish for 7 years and can communicate at a basic level but cannot decipher what most Spanish speaker say as it comes too rapidly and often too softly. Even powerful hearing aids don't help much.

I've come to terms with the likelihood I'll never be really fluent. That wasn't my goal when we came but it appears I'll have to settle for that. That is pretty disappointing to me.

I can't speak for Ecuador but here expats make a very significant contribution in supporting local businesses, participating and funding local charities and employing people and treating them better than is the norm here. We are not a bunch of free loaders, quite the contrary. I notice that on a person to person level, almost everyone here is happy to work with our limitations.

My husband and I are both hearing impaired: he in particular, so I relate very well to what Mainecoons is saying. We both use high-end hearing aids.

We have taken Spanish courses in San Miguel from the Warren Hardy School (very intensive) as well as two of the lighter weight ones offered by LCS.

Result: Able to read Spanish fairly well; speak very simply to employees, merchants and restaurant people, but as soon as a native Spanish speaker talks.......we're lost in translation.

We are Permanente residents. We both wanted to become citizens, and last year we started the process, paid all the preliminary fees through Spencer's office and were under the impression that speaking Spanish with the Guadalajara official would not be essential, especially since we've lived in Mexico over ten years. Surprise: the official had a bit of an "attitude" and spoke with such an odd, heavy accent that even the Mexican lawyer who accompanied us had difficulty understanding him. We both flunked. Fees; bye bye. They will not give a written test, so I guess we'll never be citizens of Mexico. We will remain here unless some egregious law is passed, such as that in Ecuador. My empathy for those being forced to leave is great.

So, when anyone gets righteous on these boards about the necessity of being fluent in Spanish, I get beyond annoyed.

I'm sure there are other older expats here in the same situation, so IMO, the critics should think a bit longer before they speak so harshly on the subject. sh.

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This is getting political. Better stop now.

The cat goes with my member handle. I decided Darth Vader was appropriate for my moderator image among some of the folks here who just can't quite get it we aren't going to have the personal attacks and abuse here that are typical of the (you know where) board.

The only flood we're going to have around here IMO will be if it rains too hard too long.

May the Force Be With You RV!

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Yes Gringal, that is where I run into problems. I can read Spanish pretty well, know how to do all the main stream verb conjugations and understand most of the grammar but the hearing problem is thus far the killer. We've tried various Spanish teachers some of whom I couldn't understand and none of whom have a way to handle the hearing problem.

I haven't given up but I'm a bit discouraged at this point.

BTW I'd be willing to bet that a lot of elderly Mexicans who have gone to the U.S. are having the same problem with English we are with Spanish.

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Yes Gringal, that is where I run into problems. I can read Spanish pretty well, know how to do all the main stream verb conjugations and understand most of the grammar but the hearing problem is thus far the killer. We've tried various Spanish teachers some of whom I couldn't understand and none of whom have a way to handle the hearing problem.

I haven't given up but I'm a bit discouraged at this point.

BTW I'd be willing to bet that a lot of elderly Mexicans who have gone to the U.S. are having the same problem with English we are with Spanish.

I have spoken to quite a few expats with the same problem, so we have plenty of company. Pollo at LCS has a busy office.

You're probably right about Mexican immigrants to the U.S., especially the older ones.

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I am also in the ‘not fluent boat‘ and probably never will be, but can also converse with patient people, but not with those who use rapid-fire speed and a lot of slang or modismos. I am also in the hearing impaired crowd; being almost completely deaf in one ear. I do wear programmable hearing aids for certain situations, and they do help.

That said, I have found that Spanish teachers and classes were only helpful to a point. Beyond that, an hour each day on Duolingo was much more productive. However, you must do it every day and then hit the street and practice with Spanish speakers. Even here, I keep the Guadalajara FM music and news channel in the background on my computer. I enjoy the music and may not be paying much attention to the news and comments, but it does keep me current in vocabulary and sounds, which is where a proper accent comes from. Duolingo.com is free and effective. Give it a try. Much, much better than Rosetastone, etc.

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We will remain here unless some egregious law is passed, such as that in Ecuador.

You seemed to have taken the bait. Had you checked out the links given, you would have seen, "This weekend there was a message published stating that residents need to take a language proficiency test to maintain residency status. This is to let our clients know that this is not true and there is no legal basis for such a claim. This is just a joke in very poor taste."

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You seemed to have taken the bait. Had you checked out the links given, you would have seen, "This weekend there was a message published stating that residents need to take a language proficiency test to maintain residency status. This is to let our clients know that this is not true and there is no legal basis for such a claim. This is just a joke in very poor taste."

So you're saying we had an original troll spreading false information about Ecuador. How about quoting your source for "your clients" refuting it?

Would be appreciated by those who also "took the bait".

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Gosh, I thought I made my self clear when I commented, "Had you checked out the links given". I did not think I would be interrogated about its content. For your review, the link: http://gringosabroad.com/ecuador/spanish-residency-requirement-ecuador/

Thank you for the clarification. There were a number of links on the thread other than this one. True "interrogation" would involve a pliers or a waterboard. Have a good one. :ph34r:

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I am also in the ‘not fluent boat‘ and probably never will be, but can also converse with patient people, but not with those who use rapid-fire speed and a lot of slang or modismos. I am also in the hearing impaired crowd; being almost completely deaf in one ear. I do wear programmable hearing aids for certain situations, and they do help.

That said, I have found that Spanish teachers and classes were only helpful to a point. Beyond that, an hour each day on Duolingo was much more productive. However, you must do it every day and then hit the street and practice with Spanish speakers. Even here, I keep the Guadalajara FM music and news channel in the background on my computer. I enjoy the music and may not be paying much attention to the news and comments, but it does keep me current in vocabulary and sounds, which is where a proper accent comes from. Duolingo.com is free and effective. Give it a try. Much, much better than Rosetastone, etc.

That's very good advice I'm sure. I'll have to give Duolingo another try, I found it pretty tedious but maybe I just need to work harder at it.

As always, thanks for your insights and for continuing to be on this board. You are missed around here even as crotchety as you are. :D

At least you've earned it! :)

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That's very good advice I'm sure. I'll have to give Duolingo another try, I found it pretty tedious but maybe I just need to work harder at it.

As always, thanks for your insights and for continuing to be on this board. You are missed around here even as crotchety as you are. :D

At least you've earned it! :)

There's a more pleasant audio/video CD producted by Visual Link languages. Interactive; good voices and some fun, too. Costs a bit, but IMO, worth it.

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To the topic. I see the continued flow of expats into Mexico. Not a flood, but I expect it to be real steady. I retired at 56. The requirements were not difficult to meet. The comments on this board that Mexico is now on par with the US are laughable. My Property taxes in Michigan were just slightly higher than my total budget for 2 months here in SMA and I do not live like the poor in the Compos. My electric bill here is 7 times less, even with the convoluted CFE system.

The reason that I do not see a "wave" coming is simple. It takes a sense of adventure to leave everything behind. Most people fear the unknown and will not ever even look at expatriation. It is just too far out of their comfort zone. I am good with all of that, as I do not want to see Soccer Mom syndrome come here any faster than it will naturally.

As for Ecuador I went there several times and I looked at it very carefully, over all Mexico is just a friendlier easier place to live. President Correa is fairly Socialist, but also very protectionist so imported goods cost far more. Electronics are hugely expensive. Indications are it is going to get worse.

As for language I agree with most that it is very hard at this age. I use Doulingo every day and have a large Spanish vocabulary. But I cannot hold a conversation with a native speaker. All of my Mexican friends have far better English and thankfully are very patient with my attempts at Spanish.

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Good post, Michigander.

I especially agree with your comment that expatriation is just too far out of most comfort zones.

I reminds me of the time a business associate from the midwest U.S. came to Southern California in winter and couldn't believe the blooming flowers and the mild weather. He said he'd love to move, but his town was "where all my friends are", so the idea of moving west was not thinkable.

Moving to Mexico? What a concept.

:o

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