Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

FAKE CAR NATIONALIZATION PAPERS??


CalGal

Recommended Posts

Linda....this is obviously a nerve wracking process. Best you get the returno segura ASAP, drive the car north and get rid of it. The longer you hold on to it the more stressed you will be. Life is too short to live with the stress in what should be a stress free time of your life. Money isn't everything.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 93
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Linda....this is obviously a nerve wracking process. Best you get the returno segura ASAP, drive the car north and get rid of it. The longer you hold on to it the more stressed you will be. Life is too short to live with the stress in what should be a stress free time of your life. Money isn't everything.

EXCELLENT ADVICE. Take the car to the border and sell it. Buy a car here in Mexico from a repudiable dealer. You'll never regret it. And by all means stay away from facilators, brokers, and con artists who promise you everything, take your money, then deliver phony papers or simply do nothing but stall and make false promises. I have been down that road and believe me the easy short-cuts don't work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

arv42 - it is lawyers from Mexican customs/Aduana telling you exactly how to LEGALLY sell your car in Mexico, without any residual liability. They will also tell you how to remove the TIP. If you are willing to accept Blue Book U.S. wholesale or dealer trade in value, which is about what the "liquidators" offer anyways, you should have no difficulty selling in Mexico. Once the papers are signed, everything after that happens to that vehicle is 100% the Mexican purchaser's responsibility.

If you are selling your car because you are becoming an immigrant to Mexico, which is exactly what Permanent Resident is, maybe it is about time to learn how a Mexican would deal with these issues.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Any rumors of problems with Immigration and your Visa if Permanente and found driving a US plated or illegal car

If I understand your question, I have had clients who are PR who received a letter from Aduana saying they have a foreign plated car in Mexico and to resolve the issue.

The advice to the Luke was to remove car from Mexico asap. If she / he is a client of Spencer and involved in legal action, I would ask Spencer is it best to have vehicle in Mexico as evidence. By removing car from Mexico will it lessen chance of winning the case? Best to think through all the scenarios. I believe in Luke's case the amount involved is considerable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.

If you are selling your car because you are becoming an immigrant to Mexico, which is exactly what Permanent Resident is, maybe it is about time to learn how a Mexican would deal with these issues.

Just exactly how would a Mexican deal with these issues?

You offer a lot of advice on vehicle importation and related issues,have you had any recent first hand experience dealing with this stuff?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Car isnt evidence the fake papers are.

Link to post
Share on other sites

arv42 - it is lawyers from Mexican customs/Aduana telling you exactly how to LEGALLY sell your car in Mexico, without any residual liability. They will also tell you how to remove the TIP. If you are willing to accept Blue Book U.S. wholesale or dealer trade in value, which is about what the "liquidators" offer anyways, you should have no difficulty selling in Mexico. Once the papers are signed, everything after that happens to that vehicle is 100% the Mexican purchaser's responsibility.

If you are selling your car because you are becoming an immigrant to Mexico, which is exactly what Permanent Resident is, maybe it is about time to learn how a Mexican would deal with these issues.

YEA RIGHT. Just another quick,easy fix, no problems,nada, todo sale bien. I have been down that road before. There isn't any sure way of nationalizing a car, other than taking it to the border. Forget the facilitators,LIQUIDATORS,lawyers, whatever. Bite the bullet and drive it out,sell it or nationalize it,if you can, which is doubtful and buy a Mexican car.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The mistake was made a couple of years ago. Spencer was trying to get experience putting together group lawsuits, and suggested a court challenge of the new, and rather stunning changes to the immigration/customs laws. Of course everybody said "wonderful!" - until they realized that this would take time and money, their time and money. Que Surprise - support dried up, everyone hoping that someone else would pay for it and they would get the free benefits.

This was also back in the time before they modified the Amparo laws. Spencer felt that there was something confusing and haphazard about the way the laws were formed. It was interesting to read from Luke that another lawyer thought the same thing. I am not a lawyer, but I have studied comparative and international law for a long time. A type of hobby. Anyways, there are certain "patterns" of justice common in all democracies. In this immigration law there are at least three fundamental weaknesses and I believe a Federal Judge would bring them in line with the principles of Natural Justice. The result, if the case was successful, compulsory permanent residency would become optional after four years, and temporary residency could be extended from within Mexico with an annual fee. Hardly earth shattering, but it would make a lot of people happy and make the law more fair - which I am positive was the goal of the legislators in the first place. I might add that it would also extend a revenue source to the Federal Government.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to file an amapro before a clarification on permanentes came out as part of the revised aduana law, now there is no gray area to hang my hat on as the law is clear and even if it wasnt would be an expensive federal lawsuit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I am not a lawyer, but I have studied comparative and international law for a long time. A type of hobby."

No offense, but I would just as soon not take legal advice from an anonymous poster on a web board who is saying in effect, "I am not a lawyer but I play one on the internet." :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

We are not going to rely on any more legal advise one way or the other. We relied on legal advise (we thought) when we "nationalized/legalized/imported" or whatever the correct term is the first time. Now we have legal advise that really isn't helping us that much. I certainly am not going to rely on legal advise as to how to sell my car here in Mexico. As soon as we are physically able we will be returning it to the States and just doing without a car until we can put the money together to get what we want down here. What really hurts about all this mess is the person that sold us this bill of goods for $45,000.00 pesos was a supposed friend of 9 years. If you can't trust someone that you have known and associated with at least every month for 9 years ... don't think I am going to trust any lawyer whether they are recommended or not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure just what you can do to be safe. My neighbor went NOB and sold his car, found a used car here at a big dealership and bought it.

Turns out that it is stolen and he's trying to sort that out.

"Buyer Beware" takes on a whole new meaning down here

Link to post
Share on other sites

No offense, but I would just as soon not take legal advice from an anonymous poster on a web board who is saying in effect, "I am not a lawyer but I play one on the internet." :D

The trouble is that it IS offensive. I have never once pretended to be a lawyer and I have never offered legal advice. It would be more accurate to say "free advice is worth the price". A lot of people fishing around for free information.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I am not a lawyer, but I have studied comparative and international law for a long time. A type of hobby."

No offense, but I would just as soon not take legal advice from an anonymous poster on a web board who is saying in effect, "I am not a lawyer but I play one on the internet." :D

CHILLIN never said he was a lawyer, nor is he pretending to be one, or offering legal advice. His comment and opinion was sensible and on point. Why do you Xena, twist people's words, and put words in other peoples mouths that they didn't say? (same thing you did to me in the Cocina forum, today) Then write "No offense" and end it with a smiley face with teeth. THAT is offensive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When was the Txx-Corp thing….???….three years ago???

It really sucks that people are still being victimized by this car stuff. Sorry about everybody's troubles and losses, People CAN learn from the misfortunes of others, if they're paying attention, so thanks to those who are saying, "here's what happened to me..." You really are doing a service for others.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's one option to fix the "Fake Car Nationalization Papers" problem we haven't mentioned yet.

As described in the Chapala . com thread, Playaboy bought my US plated car--very happy with the transaction - Ajijic/Chapala/Guadalajara , Playaboy's service to legally remove our cars from Mexico works even with fake car nationalization papers, and he does all the work.

If you're worried about it, there are additional recommendations and discussions about how it works over on TOB
He says that he has letters of recommendation that he can share.
Link to post
Share on other sites

That has already been mentioned. Playaboy is buying a car in Mexico at wholesale blue book and then selling it in the U.S.A. for retail blue book. What hasn't been mentioned is that any U.S. plated vehicle sold in the U.S. is "tainted" if the potential buyer discovers that the car has spent considerable time in Mexico. Too much fear and misunderstanding.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"tainted" OMG your must be kidding..how would this ever come out :015:

That's the point of mentioning it - you don't want it too. Used car dealers want to say that a car was used by "a little old lady from Pasadena, who only drove to church on Sundays" not a "little old lady from Chapala, Mexico who only drove to Walmart on Tuesdays".

Link to post
Share on other sites

That has already been mentioned. Playaboy is buying a car in Mexico at wholesale blue book and then selling it in the U.S.A. for retail blue book. What hasn't been mentioned is that any U.S. plated vehicle sold in the U.S. is "tainted" if the potential buyer discovers that the car has spent considerable time in Mexico. Too much fear and misunderstanding.

That's ridiculous. Playaboy isn't selling the cars at retail prices. He's selling the majority of the vehicles in Texas on the border.The people buying, including used car dealers don't care where the cars came from, as long as the papers are good. They are looking to buy CHEAP and sell at RETAIL or higher. Many of these cars will be sold back into Mexico to Mexican used car dealers. I lived on the border for 5 years , Harlingen,TX., and have known several used car dealers there and am familiar with how they operate.This type of business goes on all the time. It's not difficult to sell a car in the Rio Grande Valley, if you are willing to discount your vehicle. There are hundreds of small used car dealers buying and selling all kinds of cars from Brownsville to the upper Valley. No problem to find a buyer for your car.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait, now we're also removing links to TOB? Why? What does that accomplish?

Probably because when they aren't abusing each other there they enjoy libeling this board. We're tired of it and them. Previously we did allow references to it and even suggested our members go there. However, we've had enough of the abuse and will no longer be doing that. Please do not post links here to that board. Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...