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Mexican Citizenship Examination


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One of my goals for 2015 is to obtain my Mexican citizenship. I understand that individuals under the age of 60 must take an examination. I was told by one person that a book exists that lists the questions that may be asked in this exam that covers Mexican history, dates, important persons, etc. I also understand that one must learn the National Anthem.

If anyone is familiar with the name or the book and where I can purchase it, I'd be grateful.

Thanks in advance for the help,

Valerie :)

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The sample 100 questions and answers used to be available on the SRE website. I imagine they still are. I glanced, but didn't see where they're hiding. And right now I don't have time for the hunt. Link below. Go into Trámites y servicios -> naturalización, etc.

FWIW I have an old copy of the sample questions from a couple of years ago if you want to borrow it to photocopy, but it's probably best to make sure you have their latest, in case they've shuffled the deck or added one about Jenni Rivera. :lol:

Also, thanks for the reminder. I think I can start the process this year, too.

http://www.sre.gob.mx

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When we did it (finalized 2007) they didn't care about your age. Everyone had to take the exam. But maybe a lot of things have changed since then.....

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Thanks for the info., I'll check these sources.

Valerie :)

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There is a guy there with a speech impediment so beware, otherwise study this book http://www.sre.gob.mx/images/stories/docnatnacio/guia_estudio13.pdf

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The actual book from which the questions are prepared is a 6th-grade Mexican history book. My wife used it to prepare for her citizenship exam, but SRE took so long in processing her application that she turned 60 before the application was approved. No history test was required.

There is, however, an oral Spanish language test no matter what your age. Judy's language 'test' was the extensive conversation necessary to work her way through the SRE system; they told her that because she had done the entire process herself, without a facilitator, that she had completed the oral exam.

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be prepared to answer in spanish why you want to live in Mexico/ be mexican. What you like about mexico and its' people, There are 4 people in the office and subs . be prepared for each to nitpick something. I had all 4 and each wanted something else. Don't argue, just smile and get them what they want.

best of luck and thanks for making the effort. Until enough of us become citizens, we won't have the ear of the politicians. When they hear that I am a citizen and am registered to vote, suddenly they pay attention.

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Basic items for applying for naturalized Mexican citizenship:

http://www.sre.gob.mx/index.php/carta-de-naturalizacion-por-residencia

5 years of continuous INM residency permits, with no breaks and no fines.**

Valid passport and copies.

No criminal record in Mexico - as proven by police records.
Able to read and speak Spanish, a proven by an oral interview/exam/dialogues.

Pass a Mexican history/culture test (if you are under age 60).
Enough dinero $$ to pay application fees.

Approved certified recently apostilled copy of your birth certificate.

A letter certifying that you have not been outside Mexico more than the allowed amount, including clear and legible dates and stamps in our passport.

(One friend recently had to get a copy of his INM permits records and INMs exit entry data.)

Finally, we need sufficient patience and persistence to get through the initial SRE process, and then to later go through the processes of getting a voters registration card etc.

John Shrall posted some very good summaries on Mexconnect of what it took for him to get it all done.
http://www.mexconnect.com/cgi-bin/forums/gforum.cgi?do=post_view_flat;post=188549;page=1;sb=post_latest_reply;so=ASC;mh=25;

**Rollybrook lists 4 years

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I had a fine when i got my renewal dates screwed up. They never mentioned it. if you own property , bring a copy of the deed. You need to have your birth certificate and marriage licence aposlled (Sp), if the name on your passport doesn't match your birth certificate. bring your income verification and proof of address. Someone comes to LCS to give advice and check papers.Have three copies of everything.

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5 years living in Mexico with FM2, inmigrante, residente temporal or permanente, NOT FM3, NOT tourist, Not no inmigrante, not residente temporal estudiante

2 years with above documents if you have Mexican spouse OR child OR are from a Latin American country.

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5 years living in Mexico with FM2, inmigrante, residente temporal or permanente, NOT FM3, NOT tourist, Not no inmigrante, not residente temporal estudiante.

And that is the part I don't understand. I wonder why FM3 years don't count, given that when the categories changed, FM3 holders were first shuffled into non-inmigrante (or inmigrante in my case), and then Residente Temporal (or Permanente in my case). Oh well, one more year to wait. No big.

=========

R E Q U I S I T O S

  • 3.Exhibir original y dos fotocopias de la tarjeta expedida por la Secretaría de Gobernación que acredite la condición de estancia de residente temporal, o residente permanente, con la que el interesado acredite su legal estancia (Art. 14 RLN), en consecuencia, la residencia en el país durante cinco años inmediatos anteriores a la fecha de la solicitud, la cual deberá tener una vigencia mínima de seis meses, posteriores a la presentación de la solicitud, del que se desprenda la Clave Única de Registro de Población (CURP);

=========

Two questions for the larger group. Where might I be able to buy a copy of the sixth grade Mexican History text? I suppose I could ask at the school near my house. I'm not worried about the test. Last time I looked at the questions I pretty much knew all the answers. I just think it'd be interesting to read the book (yes, I know, I'm a nerd).

Also, I have a certified copy of my birth certificate from California. Is the mysterious-sounding apostille thing a flashy stamp/certification that I get done here, or does that have to come from California? Thanks.

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The history book is called "Nueva Historia mínima de México", written by several authors and published by El Colegio de México. Available at any Porrua bookstore.

The apostille must be done in the state where your birth certificate was issued. You get it through the Secretary of State's office. Note that the copy of your certified birth certificate must be six months old or less.

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Rumor is that when they caught the Chinese guy with a house full of cash they stopped counting time on FM3. New law states that temporal time counts but law only came into effect November 2012. Many people will start their 5 years in 2012 with the change so we hope to have many new proud citizens in 2018.

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Rumor is that when they caught the Chinese guy with a house full of cash they stopped counting time on FM3.

The Chinese guy was granted Mexican citizenship by Presidente Fox in a public ceremony.
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Yes, he had time on FM3 that was part of the rumor

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The requirements have changed. Your documents have to be copied in a certain way, depending on the document. We had 500 pesos of copied documents refused as they were just "copies" and not in color or enlarged as per the new regs.

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If I understand an apostille correctly, it only guarantees that the signature on your birth certificate (or other document) is an official signature, not that any information on the document itself is accurate. Seems a waste to me.

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Since America's official documents also include a number of security features like embossing, stamps/seals, and bar codes, the apostille also certifies that the document itself is genuine, certifies the date of issuance, and certifies that it is a genuine document, issued by the correct government agency.

This is why US State government's produce apostilled documents by issuing fresh new original birth certificate documents (not some old copy) even for us geesers, created by their State health dept, and then shuttling the birth certificate over to the State Secretary's office to apostille it to certify that the document is genuine, complete (with appropriate signatures), current, and issued by the correct State agency.

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Interesting, as I just got apostilles from Colorado on B.C. and that was not at all my experience. I guess different states have different rules, or maybe they had been "smoking": that day. :D Go figure.

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The easiest way to get long form US birth certificates is an online company called VitalChek. They're not inexpensive but they are efficient.

Some states carry all vital records in the state capital. Michigan is one example where all orders are processed in Lansing and an apostilled long form can be ordered in one step.

Texas birth certificates are produced at county level. You have to order one then mail it to Austin for the apostille step. Every state has their own process.

Of course after all that the document must be translated into Spanish.

Never try to second guess or question SRE citizenship rules. While some make no sense you'll not be approved until you comply with their demands. The good news is that in my experience SRE is the most organized and least threatening department of the Mexican government. Far easier to deal with than INM and certainly SAT.

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