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Website to check legality of Vehicle Nationalization?


Travis

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A friend had his car nationalized. He has Jalisco plates. Still, I told him it would be a good idea to check to make sure everything is kosher with Aduana. Is the website below the one he should use, and does he just need to enter the VIN and the Pedimento? Thanks.

I don't have the paperwork, so I have no idea what "Patente - 4 digits" and "Documento - 7 digits" are.

http://www.aduanas.sat.gob.mx/soianet/oia_consultarap_cep.aspx

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If you email me a scan of the pedimento I can check. You need to use the information asked on the left side of the web page and not VIN. You need the Aduana office location and the numbers you noted are taken from the pedimento number at the top of the pedimento itself.

Note also check REPUVE. Unfortunately, neither are guaranteeing the vehicle was legally nationalized. An Aduana employee can fraudulently clone a previous pedimento.

Also, did the vehicle come with plates? It should not have.

saludos

Sonia

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Thanks so much, Sonia! Yours is a very kind offer, but it's not my car and I don't have the paperwork. It's for a friend. I'll send him the website along with your instructions. If he wants to take it further, that's up to him. Thanks again!

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If you email me a scan of the pedimento I can check. You need to use the information asked on the left side of the web page and not VIN. You need the Aduana office location and the numbers you noted are taken from the pedimento number at the top of the pedimento itself.

Note also check REPUVE. Unfortunately, neither are guaranteeing the vehicle was legally nationalized. An Aduana employee can fraudulently clone a previous pedimento.

Also, did the vehicle come with plates? It should not have.

saludos

Sonia

We got our car imported or nationalized or whatever by the lady at the GDL airport and she gave us plates. When we moved to another state and tried to get plates, they told us the car was under a company name in Mexico City and it can only be plated in Jalisco - great. At least we have "permission to drive it" and weren't arrested or anything.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am having great difficulty obtaining my pedimento from the broker who did the importation without paying an exorbitant amount of extortion.

Is there a way I can find out if the car has actually been imported before I probably will have to pay?

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I respectfully disagree. You are good if you can check by VIN. Many people with fake pedimentos only show results searching by pedimentos number and show nothing when searching by VIN number. Pedimentos are cloned so searching by that number alone really doesnt mean anything

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We got our car imported or nationalized or whatever by the lady at the GDL airport and she gave us plates. When we moved to another state and tried to get plates, they told us the car was under a company name in Mexico City and it can only be plated in Jalisco - great. At least we have "permission to drive it" and weren't arrested or anything.

I have a friend who this also may have happened to. How can he check without going to another state?

Thanks!

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Sounds like the person had their car stolen by the importer if it is under anothers name. I would need to see the papers, title document, registration and pedimento.

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Plates with nationalizing, I suggest = fraud. You are to have your vehicle physically inspected by Rentas after it is nationalized before plates are possible. Definitely have Spencer check the documents he noted.

As Spencer noted previously, car can be confiscated and possibly you in jail. Consider a serious accident and what may happen, even if not your fault. Are you insured? Will police detect the problem? Could you be deported? What may happen to property you may own in Mexico?

Sonia

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One may find their vehicle on REPUVE. What has happened including vehicles "nationalized" at the GDL airport, is that older pedimento's were cloned as stated by Aduana. They were tampered with and so the VIN was changed from a previously issued pedimento. To have such a vehicle on REPUVE it means someone who works for Aduana or access to their programs and database and knows the process well is involved. So seeing a vehicle on REPUVE is no guarantee. One can also check on SAT's web site with pedimento number but this too is being manipulated. Those involved in this fraud are making $1000 to $2000 per vehicle. the temptation for those less than honest is huge.

And for the stupid post below by Steve who loves to discredit vs adding meaningful input while cowardly hiding behind a screen name and for others with interest: some clues are: if plates came with nationalizing = fraud. If pedimento is dated before the client started the process = fraud. Any non-NAFTA vehicle "nationalized" in past 8 months = fraud. If prior to Nov 2014 the vehicle "nationalized" was 2009 or newer = fraud. All of these scenarios I have seen and in more than one case proved by sending pedimento to Aduana to confirm the document is fake and the car is not nationalized. The posts above refer to cars that came with plates.

Point being know the process, what to look for and REPUVE is a good starting point to confirm as well as SAT's web site but when you get these other flags something is seriously wrong.

In past 3 months Aduana has been practically at a standstill when it comes to nationalizing.

If one paid more than 30,000 pesos to nationalize a typical $7000 vehicle in past 6 months you likely paid too much. For those paying 40,000 pesos plus which is happening at lakeside ... OMG! In past few months a typical NAFTA vehicle to be nationalized virtually is costing about 5000 p more than at the border and that means 19000 to 24000 p. Luxury vehicles and diesels may be more.

Hope this helps.

Sonia

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Does this mean that facilitators recent claims are not correct about a pedimento entry in REPUVE means the pedimento is valid?

How does that fit with the recent professional's advice to check

http://www.aduanas.sat.gob.mx/soianet/oia_consultarap_cep.aspx ?

What sources have you used to check the validity of your prior imports, if these 2 are unreliable?

We have 2 friends with vehicles awaiting pedimentos, so it's troubling that some people are now saying that the pedimentos they checked & confirmed in the past. proclaiming them as OK using the government databases are now likely frauds.

messy...

This is where a person checks to see if a vehicle is actually nationalized.

http://www2.repuve.gob.mx:8080/ciudadania/

Confirming pedimento with Aduana:

http://www.aduanas.sat.gob.mx/soianet/oia_consultarap_cep.aspx

One receives an original pedimento from Aduana and a factura from the broker. To those who are wondering, the pedimento has one and sometimes two blue stamps and the vehicle VIN but no name. The factura has brokers name and the name of the person who supplied the ID to nationalize. The factura does not need to be original. In most states those documents must be taken to Rentas, the state licensing authority and your documents reviewed, a stolen vehicle report issued and your vehicle inspected to confirm the documents and vehicle are one and the same. And while anything in Mexico is possible usually one would not have documents and plates arriving together.

Those I have seen including two pedimentos today could not include plates.

In some cases people have been able to break the rules as their vehicles were nationalized through the 18 brokers under investigation. This sometimes includes stolen and newer vehicles. So any one nationalizing check and see which are the 18 brokers. their names are in several newspapers etc.

There are / were some totally ethical people nationalizing (incl. at GDL airport)

and as hard as someone may try and discredit those who are ethical including an obsession to discredit those who are legitimate, they can not. And for those who suggest changes at Aduana, I ask that you kindly print the Spanish changes as written by SAT in effect today that you allude to. I know of almost daily communication between SAT and a very informed person who nationalizes several cars a day and for this group nothing has changed. I also know this week I went twice to Celaya to the main SAT office for meetings and they are aware of no new laws in effect today. For at least one organization who is totally respected virtual nationalizing continues to this day all through an approved broker who is not being investigated.

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As Sonia said

if plates came with nationalizing = fraud. If pedimento is dated before the client started the process = fraud. This is 100%. There is also much more to this than we may ever know due to a huge corruption bust including judges, etc.

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The web sites Spencer and I use to check pedimentos are the same ones each state uses to check validity of documents and for a stolen vehicle report. If fraud is suspected we check with Aduana directly.

If one nationalizes in someone else's as post below, the true owner will pay tenencia when registering as it is considered a sale. I nationalize NAFTA cars in the true owner's name and therefore no tax.

On a related note: this is from a person we know who wanted a faster process and drove to Nogales in October, his name is Jim A. The agent is Oscar. Right now all nationalizing is a mess and the issue is Aduana.

Imported my truck on October 10th--paperwork in hand--but papers have still NOT arrived in Tepic--so I can get my plates! Apparently the entire week of Oct 8-15 did not get sent out. Tried to do everything by the book--but no one knows what is going on. Assume 100's in same position for that week. Heard it happened one other week back in July. Then told that after the 30 days-- that I had to get plates--there is a big fine....and since different office..they don't care about WHY I will be late. Whew---waiting...frustrating. And since my 30 days are past...I am actually driving around illegally! Not that anyone cares.

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Let me begin by saying I really don't have a clue what I'm talking about.

In spite of feeling royally screwed by a so-called Nationalizer in Nuevo Laredo, I may be one of the lucky ones.

After seven weeks of being lied to, extorted, having expended in fees and expenses about twice what my car is worth,

(Please, don't tell me I should have not started the process in the first place.Maybe, i was dumb then, but I think, hope, this experience has corrected the situation.)

I am home with the car with my papers in order.

The thing that confused me when I received the papers was that it had been sold to a dealer in Sonora. My original title, unsigned by me, was transferred to him and the pedomento is in his name as well.

Remember, my caveat! I really don't have a clue what I'm talking about!

But, apparently that is the way that cars are being nationalized. They are sold to a dealer who then imports them under the dealer's name. Then, it is the original owner's responsibility to have them transferred back to their name.

I think I am in the process of doing just that, but I'll see.

I finally got out of the tar baby in Nuevo laredo.

I hope I don't end up in another one here.

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Yes, that is one "paper-only" system used by some "facilitators".

The Aduana permanent import rules are different (more liberal) for Mexican car dealers than the Aduana rules for privately-owned vehicles. Dealers near the border "buy" your car in a paper-only process. They then import your car, using their name, as papers submitted to Aduana. Aduana processes the "dealer import" without seeing the car, and issues a pedimento in the dealer's name.

The dealer then sells the car back to the original owner - on paper. The original owner then has to get the car registered and plated in their home state in Mexico.

When do the taxes get paid in this system? Did the dealer have to pay IVA taxes when "buying" your car?

and then charge IVA taxes again when "selling" your car back to you?

This might explain unusually high total "import" fees, since you said the import cost more than the car was worth.

Will you have to pay IVA taxes - again - to your state when you register the car? *ouch*

Do the government websites Sonia advises using (shown above), show that you have a valid pedimento?

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  • 3 weeks later...

Kim, the only simple solution; and maybe the only possible solution is to remove the car from Mexico before you apply for Residente Permanente. Fly or take a bus back and buy a car in Jalisco; it is simple and new car dealers have very good used cars on their lots. For older cars, I suggest that you have S&S Motors look for a good one for you.

We ran into that nationaliation problem and health issues prevented removal of the car without hiring someone else to drive it north. So, having a second car with Jalisco plates, we simply parked the offending vehicle until we sold our home and moved to the USA. Spencer (Interasa) got us a Retorno Seguro, we re-insured the car with Jesus Tejada (AXA) and drove it out of Mexico without incident.

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