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HUGE Changes today to Mexican immigration law


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Guest bennie2

dear worlds best climate, i dissagree w/you on 2 points. #1) its not the world best climate, they lied. #2) i hardy call that "poor". they spend $ here, still hire maids. then the maids & workers spend more $, thats how it works. on a personal level, i wouldnt care if 90% of the expats left regardless of their income, but let that go. guess what? there are people living here who have tourist visas & renew every six months. no one checks their income. they too spend $ here.

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$20,000 pesos per month is considered by Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geográfica as Middle Class here, not poor.

http://www.radioformula.com.mx/notas.asp?Idn=331878

"Income 14 thousand pesos per month in 2013 to be considered middle class: INEGI. With Oscar M Beteta

June 13, 2013

Although the National Institute of Statistics and Geographic reported that the middle class until 2010 reported growth reaching 42.4 percent of households, Rodrigo Negrete, a researcher at the Department of Integration, Analysis and Research INEGI, reiterated that it does not shown to be an absolute majority."

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The ignorance expressed in the belief that having $2,000 US a month income equals being a "poor" person is beyond astounding.

The new financial reform requires a minumum for Residente Temporal of $1503.00 US per month, not $2,000 US.

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The only problem with how much it takes to live here is the monkey wrench unexpected medical issues can toss in. If you are over 70 private insurance is pretty much out and you are either paying out of pocket for medical care or traveling back to the U.S. and Canada for it. Otherwise, one can live quite comfortably on that amount here by being judicious about how much you spend on housing.

Rents here are pretty ridiculous by the general Mexican standard IMO.

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25k OR 1,500/month, not both

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The only problem with how much it takes to live here is the monkey wrench unexpected medical issues can toss in. If you are over 70 private insurance is pretty much out and you are either paying out of pocket for medical care or traveling back to the U.S. and Canada for it. Otherwise, one can live quite comfortably on that amount here by being judicious about how much you spend on housing.

Rents here are pretty ridiculous by the general Mexican standard IMO.

If people don't have a substantial "medical savings account", there are free and low cost options available to them, so that wouldn't be an insurmountable problem.

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If people don't have a substantial "medical savings account", there are free and low cost options available to them, so that wouldn't be an insurmountable problem.

I wish that were always true. Friend needed $8,000 USD to pay for a better quality pacemaker than IMSS provided. He borrowed the money and has since taken out medical insurance policy. Another friend was taken to San Javier with a heart problem--$50,000 USD later he was released. Family paid the $50,000. Finally, friend had gall bladder emergency in Cancun--$30,000 USD that he had to pay and then submit to his US insurance.

Other friends have maintained Medicare A and B and pay for a gap policy. They get their tests and prescriptions once a year. Their emergency fund is primarily a plane ticket to the US.

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I wish that were always true. Friend needed $8,000 USD to pay for a better quality pacemaker than IMSS provided. He borrowed the money and has since taken out medical insurance policy. Another friend was taken to San Javier with a heart problem--$50,000 USD later he was released. Family paid the $50,000. Finally, friend had gall bladder emergency in Cancun--$30,000 USD that he had to pay and then submit to his US insurance.

Other friends have maintained Medicare A and B and pay for a gap policy. They get their tests and prescriptions once a year. Their emergency fund is primarily a plane ticket to the US.

That is true only if they choose to have their care in a private hospital, such as San Javier. I am only suggesting that there are options other than high private medical care and a plane ticket to the U.S. for those who can't afford more than the basic amounts required to become a Permanent resident of Mexico.

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Are they considering your real estate you own as an asset or is it strictly money in the bank?

maw

I am also wondering this. I have been told different answers by different Embassies and Consulates. Spencer any clarification? Thanks

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I am also wondering this. I have been told different answers by different Embassies and Consulates. Spencer any clarification? Thanks

Current Rule:

"f. Bienes inmuebles en territorio nacional:

Original y copia de Escritura Pública otorgada ante Fedatario Público que acredite que la persona extranjera es titular de bienes inmuebles, con un valor que exceda de cuarenta mil días de salario mínimo general vigente en el Distrito Federal."

(Qualifying) Using Method of Owning Real Estate Property in Mexico for Residente Temporal

~ Own/have real property trustee rights, with a value equivalent to forty thousand days of general minimum wage in the Federal District, with original and copy of written proof from a Notario. "

At $13:1 MXN:USD exchange rate, this translates to about $207,050 USD (exactly $2,691,600 pesos) worth of property for one Residente Temporal.

On paper, property ownership is a qualifying factor, but people have reported problems getting INM to use property to qualify,

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That is true only if they choose to have their care in a private hospital, such as San Javier. I am only suggesting that there are options other than high private medical care and a plane ticket to the U.S. for those who can't afford more than the basic amounts required to become a Permanent resident of Mexico.

Sometimes unfocused or semiconscious people are checked into an expensive place by friends. Unknowing people sometimes believe that their friend deserves the "best"--resulting in a very large bill.

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My husband had a gall bladder emergency surgery in Chiapas and the whole thing cost him 40 000 pesos and he had complications..Not all hospitals or doctors are expensive and not all are good either.

I'm happy for your husband. My friend was in Cancun and faced an enormous bill. Had he been in Guadalajara it would have been much, much smaller. He wasn't. He was where he was. He had to pay the bill and wait for reimbursement from his US insurance.

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It would seem that many retirees would not bother to get temporary residency if they know they do not qualify for a permanent residency,

The $$ requirements listed above are for people who skip completing 4 years of Residente Temporal, and instead choose to go directly Residente Permanente. If you complete 4 successful continuous years of Residente Temporal with no breaks and no fines, then you qualify for Residente Permanente.

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The $$ requirements listed above are for people who skip completing 4 years of Residente Temporal, and instead choose to go directly Residente Permanente. If you complete 4 successful continuous years of Residente Temporal with no breaks and no fines, then you qualify for Residente Permanente.

Are you saying that if the 4 year requirements of residente temporal are met, it is not necessary to meet the requirements of resident permanente later?

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Do I have this straight..if you've lived here for 4 years or more, without interruption, you automatically qualify for Permanent

status.

Does one still have to pay the $800 dollars to Spencer to process the application, or is that now unnecessary?

Would appreciate some clarity, thanks.

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Do I have this straight..if you've lived here for 4 years or more, without interruption, you automatically qualify for Permanent

status.

Does one still have to pay the $800 dollars to Spencer to process the application, or is that now unnecessary?

Would appreciate some clarity, thanks.

Only if you hire him to faciliate your paper work.

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Do I have this straight..if you've lived here for 4 years or more, without interruption, you automatically qualify for Permanent

status.

Does one still have to pay the $800 dollars to Spencer to process the application, or is that now unnecessary?

Would appreciate some clarity, thanks.

I think you have that amount wrong or Spencer is doing the paperwork for more than one person and that includes the INM fees as well as what Spencer charges.

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