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Car Importation Investigations????


N2Futur

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http://www.sdpnoticias.com/nacional/2014/07/07/funcionarios-federales-operan-red-de-trafico-de-autos-chocolate

I came across this July article this morning. I checked our import paperwork, because one of the companies being investigated sounded familiar. Sure enough - our Nogales broker, Oscar Angulo used Autotrack Imports. I wonder what kind of consequences we and everyone else that used Oscar will have to deal with? Any advice on what to do?

"Rules changing due to bribes and fraud and 18 brokers involved. "The federal government and the Judicial Power of the Federation are investigating a network of influence peddling that imports vehicles to Mexico, where officials were involved various Service Tax Administration, Customs chiefs, judges, magistrates, legislators and PRI leaders". Among companies are: Cristi Automotive, Caoman Business Group, Business Group Yamve, Autotrack Imports, Cars YMC, A & B Automotive, Voltok, Arturo Tovar Ortiz SA de CV and Perea Ramirez Pastor SA de CV.

Another nine are represented or linked to the customs agent Roberto Ruiz Armas, as Goga Automotive, Alfa Agro, Kikis Cars and Automotive Adrey.

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Go check and see if you are legal. Spencer in Chapala could check out your plates and such and see if it was actually done and that you just don't have a pile of paper in your hands. I know so many people taken by this. I hope you are not one of them.

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One place to check is here with VIN: http://www2.repuve.gob.mx:8080/ciudadania/

We were tempted to try the person named in the OP but were warned about the broker and when someone says 3 days to nationalize virtually I know not possible and prices were higher. Plus no motorcycles, no classics, no motorhomes. I prefer to stick with a proven though slow process when handling 2,861,338 pesos so far.

I know people in several parts of Mexico who all lost their total payment including in San Miguel.

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I'm starting to be glad I have a J-Car. Seems like all I've read about for years is scams, rip-offs, and constantly changing laws. Nobody, not even the so called experts seem to know what to do or what will happen if they do it. Maybe it's time we all start a protest march and close down all the borders or maybe put our cars on that slow moving train and honk horns all the way to the border.

I think, until you can walk into wherever the place is where you renew your Mexican license, plunk 2000 pesos on the table and walk out with a license and Mexican registration, I'm going to stay out of this. It shouldn't be anymore complicated than that.

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Snafu, I agree with you. I am still waiting for the simple, legal and affordable solution to nationalizing my car. In the meantime, I am not handing over thousands of pesos to someone who may or may not have the secret, magic solution that works--or at least did last week. Nor, am I interested in being a test case for some hocus pocus that someone´s friend´s cousin´s brother-in-law´s gardener can use to make my car legal. I too am staying out of it.

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Snafu, I agree with you. I am still waiting for the simple, legal and affordable solution to nationalizing my car. I

I too am staying out of it.

Unfortunately,snafu and xena,some of us are going Permanente soon and can't "stay out of it",but thanks for the input.
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Again, it is absolutely astounding at the sense of entitlement some foreigners possess. Why should someone come to this country and dictate exactly how long they should be allowed to stay, how many household items they should be able to bring or the ease that they should be able to impost their vehicles.

If a gringo can walk into the Transito office and plop down 2000 pesos to import their vehicles, then shouldn't Mexicans be entitled to the same privilege? As it stands now, cars can be legally imported at the border. Whether one wants to accept it or not, that is the law. So take a trip to the border and make it legal. Is that really asking so much?

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I had a J-car and drove to WAshington state last summer, sold it as I knew I was going Permanente. I had already bought a Mexican plated car before I left and they drove it from Guad to Ajiic the day after I returned. Sure, I didn't like having to sell a perfectly good car BUT I wanted to be PERMANENTE so I had to adhere to the laws of my country. We may not all like the changes and the confusions, but this is Mexico and to try to apply logic to all these scenarios is basically just asking for a headache. If you want to live in this country, then you have to abide by her laws...really quite simple.

Buena suerte.

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As it stands now, cars can be legally imported at the border. Whether one wants to accept it or not, that is the law. So take a trip to the border and make it legal. Is that really asking so much?

Cooper,recently I've been reading,albeit on expat internet forums,reports of long delays at the border aduanas,personally I'd just as soon not spend a week or more hanging around indefinitely in Laredo.Do you have any current information about the these reported delays?

You mentioned that going to the border is the law,are you talking about Mexican law or US law.

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Cooper,recently I've been reading,albeit on expat internet forums,reports of long delays at the border aduanas,personally I'd just as soon not spend a week or more hanging around indefinitely in Laredo.

You mentioned that is the law,are you talking about Mexican law or US law.

Mexican law. I have nationalized 3 vehicles. It never took more than a day. And twice it took less than a day and I was on my way in the early afternoon. Regardless, just having the opportunity to legalize a foreign vehicle should be enough to make you happy. It hasn't always been so easy. In fact, not all that long ago, it used to be impossible.

If foreigners think the laws here lack logic or are too onerous, they should check out what it takes for someone to immigrate to their home country. Let alone import a used vehicle.

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Let me make it clear,Cooper,I'm not trying to get over on the Mexican government,nor do I feel any sense of entitlement,it just seems to me that the tramites could be processed and the fees paid at any aduana office in the country,they all have computers now,that way they could get their fees and people could avoid a long drive to the border,but I understand that governments do things their own way,so if I have to go to the border,so be it.

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If a gringo can walk into the Transito office and plop down 2000 pesos to import their vehicles, then shouldn't Mexicans be entitled to the same privilege?

Absolutely! What's your point?

Again, it is absolutely astounding at the sense of entitlement some foreigners possess. Why should someone come to this country and dictate exactly how long they should be allowed to stay, how many household items they should be able to bring or the ease that they should be able to impost their vehicles.

I have no sense of entitlement. I tried to import my J-Car and couldn't. Then I find out a window opened up where I could have but didn't know. Now, I can't import a J-Car, again. Then I read where the people that imported their J-Car aren't really imported. Then I read about all the people that lost money trying to import. Then I read about all the people the Mexican Government consider to be crooks running the operation. Then I read the expert importers here on this site that don't seem to know what to do. I have no sense of entitlement, I just don't wish to play the current game. You seem to thrive on thinking you're right.

Unfortunately,snafu and xena,some of us are going Permanente soon and can't "stay out of it",but thanks for the input.

I'm going Permanente and I'm still staying out of it.

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Granted, it would be easier to use the services of someone who can get 'er done without your having to go to the border. I think the real lesson we need to take away here is to be very, very careful who we hand money to in the hopes of taking this short cut. I know one couple who paid a substantial amount to have this done and lost it all in the process.

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"If foreigners think the laws here lack logic or are too onerous, they should check out what it takes for someone to immigrate to their home country. Let alone import a used vehicle."

Uh Cooper - I have a Canadian V.I.N on a J car, going to the U.S. border will do me no good at all. And since you asked, Canada avoids all this hassle (and considerable government expense) by allowing immigrants to bring in one vehicle WITH NO IMPORT FEES AT ALL, as long as they can prove they have owned it at least one year, and they have to meet Provincial and Federal emission and safety standards (all very easy and/or inexpensive), then they are issued registration/plates/insurance - all at the same price as Canadian residents.

The other issue is what consumer advocate groups would call "bait and switch". The Mexican government generously offered a place to retire, you could keep your car until it wore out, but this was expensive having to pay a FM3 or FM2 visa every year or no longer allowed at all if you became an immigrant - your choice. Then with no prior warning, or logic, they drastically changed the laws, the equivalent to an FM2 was limited to 4 years - then you had to become an immigrant and dump your foreign car. If you don't like it - get out - and that seems to be happening more and more often lately in this area.

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No Chillin didn't hit the nail on the head. What are now called Permanent residents, used to be called inmigrados, have never been allowed to have a foreign plated vehicle. And even when the Mexican government some time back started with FM3s, even temporary residents were not allowed to have a foreign plated vehicle. That was later changed to accomodate the influx of retirees. I'd say that was a pretty nice gesture, won't you all agree? But again, not a permanent immigrant. And during all of this time, the Mexican government made relocating here very easy. Menaje de casa? Are you kidding me? You couldn't bring your household goods. Things were so tough at the border you might have been shaken down for having an extra tube of toothpaste and I ain't exaggerating. Red light, green light? Didn't exist. You were completely at Immigration and Aduana's mercy.

So now, per NAFTA agreement, vehicles built in North America can be imported. Even new cars. This is according to a trade agreement between your countries and Mexico. It isn't something done with retirees in mind. It also had opposition from Mexican car dealers. That is why it was phased in over a 10-15 year period. But it is the North American Free Trade Agreement. Not for goods from elsewhere. People with vehicles built outside of NA are SOL. What a hardship!!

Then a few years back, immigration laws were changed. Now you don't have to go in once a year. How many think that is a pretty square deal? And if I am not mistaken, many people were grandfathered into the new status. How comfy was that? None of the people on this board had to deal with the old system which was truly a nightmare with PRI appointed bureaucrats dictating policy. The same ones that made it so difficult to achieve an immigration status that allowed you to remain in this country longer than 180 days that most people just gave up.

The way things are now its a walk in the park but the more they give the more gringos whine.

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For Joco:

http://www.riv.ca/USCustoms.aspx

U.S. Customs export requirements

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) require notification of all self-propelled vehicles being permanently exported from the United States. You must provide CBP with your vehicle title documents, registration and sales receipts.
note: trailers are not self-propelled vehicles and therefore exempt from this requirement.


Select a state or province and select a border crossing to retrieve and display U.S. Customs office information or view a list of all U.S Customs offices.

CBP regulations state that at land border points:

NEW!

As of April 5,2014 U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has begun a 180 days period of"informed compliance" as all exports of used self-propelled vehicles will be required to submit an Electronic Export Information (EEI) through theAutomated Export System (AES).

  1. Required documentation must be submitted at least 72 business hours prior to export; and
  2. the vehicle must be presented to U.S. Customs at the time of export.

CBP recommends that you contact the customs office where you plan to cross, directly, to verify the documentation required and their hours of operation.

Select a state or province, then choose the border crossing through which you will be importing your vehicle, to view contact information for the U.S. Customs office.

For more information, visit U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

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