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CHILLIN

UCD (La Unión Campesina Democrática)

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In recent posts I feel that the intent and activities of UCD have been somewhat misrepresented. I am thinking of getting UCD plates just because I believe in their general cause, I still have TIP for some years yet. I also feel the same way about Seguro Popular. I am joining them although we already have private catastrophic and happy with pay as you go. It is important to get the numbers/members up. If I knew other ways to help I would.

UCD is a very influential association of nearly 900,000 members in Mexico made to improve conditions and advocating for farmers etc, buy seeds, wells, irrigation, home improvements, making less expensive foreign vehicles legal, government liaison / support for their causes, etc. UCD or similar organizations can be found in most states in Mexico. Through government programs such as SEDESOL, INAES, SEDATU, YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR, EMPRENDEDRO YOUNG RURAL HOUSING they help poor people, those marginalized, orphans and work to find employment for those fighting for an opportunity at a decent life. They also are advocates for Indigenous Peoples.
For renal patients they assist in arranging and paying for dialysis and related medicines along with detection and early care of those with renal failure. UCD assists in the coordination of kidney transplants.

UCD encourages and supports sporting events and the involvement in sports while providing trophies and rewards.

In addition, free legal support for those without the resources is provided through UCD.
It is also important to UCD members to promote Mexican culture, traditions and celebrations such as Day of the Dead, Day of the Child, Mother's Day, Independence Day, etc.

UCD encourages Mexican artisans. They promotes their products to national and foreign tourists and businesses and assist with contracts between artisans and buyers / businesses. This support includes guidance in the exporting of works of art to foreign countries.

UCD also assist in nationalizing NAFTA and non-NAFTA cars, trailers, SUV’s, boats, motorcycles, RV’s including classic vehicles. This provides a legal way for all residents to legalize many foreign plated vehicles. Once nationalized a vehicle owner applies for Mexican registration and Mexican state plates allowing the vehicle to be driven anywhere from Panama to Canada.

Another and very different program is an UCD permit for vehicles. Your vehicle retains original registration in the US or Canada. Insurance companies such as Qualitas have insurance that specifically recognizes the foreign title with a rider for UCD permit. With such a permit you can only drive in the states of Mexico which has an UCD office and presence. For example, a car in San Miguel can drive in the states of Guanajuato, San Luis Potosi and Queretaro. Each car owner with an UCD permit is given a letter from the head of police for all of Guanajuato state stating your car is legal. This is totally separate to nationalizing and your vehicle remains a foreign plated car with your foreign license plate on the front and UCD permit on the back. There are ~900 such permits in San Miguel and nearly 5000 more in GTO state. In the approx. 24 states with an UCD presence there are literally tens of thousands of UCD permits.

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I'm not that up on UCD. I read about it a few years ago but thought the owner had to live in a state with a UCD office to get the UCD plate. I think they are asking for proof of residence and if the person does not live in a UCD state he cannot get a UCD plate.

I didn't know the vehicle stays registered in the original country. Does the UCD plate make it legal for permanentes to drive since it has a foreign plate?

If you live here how are you going to get a UCD plate?

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I don't know these answers but we know who does. The other benefit of the UCD plates is that if your car is stolen, police can check ownership with UCD which I doubt they would do with Canadian plates. I also believe the nationalization fees are lower (with UCD) if you decide to go that route down the road.

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You mostly got it right. The problem is this Webboard is for Chapala, Jalisco and none of that will apply here. At least that's the way it was the last time I checked. I found this site http://www.infored.com.mx/e/u-c-d-colima-hotmail-com.html. On the top right of the page is this:

Descripción

U. C. D. Colima, es una empresa dedicada a la legalización de vehiculos de procedencia extranjera, únicamente de estados unidos, así como investigación de estatus legal de automotores nacionales o extranjeros. afiliacion de vehiculos americanos de modelos 2008 y anteriores los cuales se encuentren en los estados de michoacan, jalisco, y colima.

Visión

Posicionarse como una empresa reconocida con experiencia en legalización de vehículos. modelos 2005 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, y anteriores, cullos vehiculos se encuentren en el interior del pais

Misión

Favorecer a los ciudadanos por medio de la legalización de vehículos con honorarios mininos y en plazo corto de tiempo.

Translated:

Description

U. C. D. Colima, is a company dedicated to the legalization of vehicles of foreign origin, only in the United States, as well as the investigation of legal status of national or foreign motor. affiliation of american vehicles in 2008 and earlier models which are in the states of Michoacan, Jalisco and Colima.

Vision

to position itself as a well recognized company with experience in legalization of vehicles, models 2005 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, and earlier, cullos vehicles are in the interior of the country

mission
promote to the citizens through the legalization of vehicles with fees kittens and in a short period of time.

Now I'm really confused as this clearly states Jalisco. Maybe it's old data as Jalisco was closed.

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UCD is in many states but not in Jalisco. The first year the fee is approx 700 p to join and 25 p per month which can be prepaid for rest of year and following year about 500 p if prepaid.

Several insurance companies such as Qualitias in Mexico have a policy recognizing foreign registration (US or Canada) and have a rider for the UCD permit. In other words you are fully insured.

In GTO state for example you can drive in the states of San Luis Potosi, GTO and Queretaro with the one permit. In SMA there are just over 900 such permits and 5000 plus in GTO state. Each person gets a letter to carry signed by the head of police for the state saying car is legal. I realize this does not help you in Jalisco as there is no UCD there maybe a similar organization. I am told Canadians have a similar organization called Farmer's Co-op.

As I noted many states have this program as they have UCD active in their state or a similar organization.

Literally, daily, I communicate with the head of UCD for GTO state. He was with Aduana 13 years. UCD had a meeting in July and is working for national recognition of the UCD permit and other programs to assist those with foreign plated cars. There are 2 or 3 very influential auto dealer organizations that work hard to stop this and with so many new car assembly and part plants in and coming to Mexico Governors can be less that supportive especially of the cost to nationalize is reduced.

On a side note, there is a person I am communicating with as recent as 5 minutes ago. He is 1 mile from the MX border and has been there for at least 3 days. He has a preapproved permanent resident visa and was planning on nationalizing at the border. Three brokers have told him Aduana for nationalizing is closed and not sure when they will open. He can enter and get a 30 day TIP but what a hassle.

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Now I'm really confused as this clearly states Jalisco. Maybe it's old data as Jalisco was closed.

Well that would be great if we can get the plates for use in Jalisco. It is my understanding that once a vehicle is nationalized and plated with the MX state's plates it cannot be re-nationalized in the U.S. or Canada.

With a UCD plate if the vehicle keeps the original plate then it should easily go back to the original country without re-nationalizing, which can't be done anyway.

Written during Sonia's answer. I guess we have to move to SMA or Colima.

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In GTO state for example while vehicles are being nationalized UCD gives a free permit to whose who are Permanent Residents to keep them legal.

The issue of registering in the US and Canada again after being nationalized in Mexico is a different matter. Canadians do not have to "export" their vehicle when they take it "permanently" out of Canada. Some will say, and I have seen different views that Americans should "export" from the US when they nationalize in Mexico. That process I believe takes 3 days and I believe few brokers actually do this. The vehicle has to be presented to what I think is called US Customs or equivalent. So in a few rare cases people have nationalized in Mexico and not "exported" and then for whatever reason moved back to the US and simply made current their US state documents. I am not here to debate the pros and cons of "exporting".

If people were exporting then they need to be there 3 days and most report they are there a matter of a very few hours. Therefore I believe they are not "exporting".

Joco and Chillin thanks for your support. In case anyone is wondering I have not met either of you nor spoken with you.

saludos

Sonia

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On a side note, there is a person I am communicating with as recent as 5 minutes ago. He is 1 mile from the MX border and has been there for at least 3 days. He has a preapproved permanent resident visa and was planning on nationalizing at the border. Three brokers have told him Aduana for nationalizing is closed and not sure when they will open. He can enter and get a 30 day TIP but what a hassle.

Unless I'm misreading this, I don't understand how he has an option to get a TIP.... he's Permanente.

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Sonia, the "exporting" is for vehicles that are commercial, that is, exported from the U.S. to be sold in Mexico. The exporting is not for personal vehicles that are for private use and that is why brokers at the border do not export private vehicles.

The rule is very clear and uses the word "commercial" and commercial means a business not a private person who is not in business.

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Unless I'm misreading this, I don't understand how he has an option to get a TIP.... he's Permanente.

He has been approve by a consulate to get a Permanente but he is not Permanente until he gets the card from INM after he reaches his destination.

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Unless I'm misreading this, I don't understand how he has an option to get a TIP.... he's Permanente.

Rick he is preapproved Permanent Resident and not a PR visa holder so Aduana issues a 30 day permit as he has 30 days to report to INM. I have seen this several times. The person is to nationalize in those 30 days or take back to border. Unfortunately at least where he is, no one can nationalize.

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Sonia, the "exporting" is for vehicles that are commercial, that is, exported from the U.S. to be sold in Mexico. The exporting is not for personal vehicles that are for private use and that is why brokers at the border do not export private vehicles.

The rule is very clear and uses the word "commercial" and commercial means a business not a private person who is not in business.

Joco I personally agree with you so I was cautious with my words. :-)

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A dictionary makes it easier to understand for the one person who doesn't understand the definition (not you Sonia.)

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/commercial

"Concerned with or engaged in commerce"

"Making or intended to make a profit"

"Having profit rather than artistic or other value as a primary aim:"

their work is too commercial

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Sonia,

I understand that you are also familiar with Seguro Popular. I have a friend that needs an angioplasty and has SP. I looked through the covered procedures and didn't see it listed. Do you know if they will cover it? He may need a stent also.

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JRM if you or or email me I will send the translated booklet. SONIANGEL32@HOTMIL.COM

At any time, if you have any problems at the hospital including billing, quality of care etc., you are advised to contact the Medico Gestor.

If still need an answer I will phone the manager and ask manana.

At least here in SMA they are very supportive and generous. None of my 180 plus clients have paid a fee to join and last year almost 5000 surgeries done in SMA and 95% free.

Sorry if off topic.

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Sonia, the "exporting" is for vehicles that are commercial, that is, exported from the U.S. to be sold in Mexico. The exporting is not for personal vehicles that are for private use and that is why brokers at the border do not export private vehicles.

The rule is very clear and uses the word "commercial" and commercial means a business not a private person who is not in business.

Have you ever nationalized a vehicle at the border, Joco?

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Have you ever nationalized a vehicle at the border, Joco?

I have one vehicle and I have not nationalized it yet. Why? Are you asking because of the rule that was discussed about exporting U.S. vehicles?

The exporting is for people who are taking vehicles out of the U.S. for commercial purposes. The rule is clear that it is for commercial purposes not private vehicles. There is only one person who thinks it applies to U.S. private use vehicles in Mexico that will be nationalized in Mexico.

Exporting a Motor Vehicle
Interpretation and Application of 19 CFR Part 192
Section 192.1 Definitions
The following are general definitions for the purposes of CFR 192.2:
Export. "Export" refers to the transportation of merchandise out of the U.S. for the purpose of being entered into the commerce of a foreign country.
Ultimate Purchaser. "Ultimate Purchaser" means the first person, other than a dealer purchasing in his capacity as a dealer, who in good faith purchases a self-propelled vehicle for purposes other than resale.

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I have one vehicle and I have not nationalized it yet. Why? Are you asking because of the rule that was discussed about exporting U.S. vehicles?

The exporting is for people who are taking vehicles out of the U.S. for commercial purposes. The rule is clear that it is for commercial purposes not private vehicles. There is only one person who thinks it applies to U.S. private use vehicles in Mexico that will be nationalized in Mexico.

Include me in with the person that thinks it applies to private vehicles. I had to do some fast talking at the border with US Customs officers to avoid a $500 USD fine for not following the procedure. On the American side of the border, there are facilities where cars meant for export to Mexico have their titles checked for any liens or stolen vehicles. Been there, done it several times. "Entering into the commerce" does not mean the vehicle is used commercially. It means it is no longer part of US commerce and no belongs to the commerce of Mexico, where it can be bought or sold freely.

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Include me in with the person that thinks it applies to private vehicles. I had to do some fast talking at the border with US Customs officers to avoid a $500 USD fine for not following the procedure. On the American side of the border, there are facilities where cars meant for export to Mexico have their titles checked for any liens or stolen vehicles. Been there, done it several times. "Entering into the commerce" does not mean the vehicle is used commercially. It means it is no longer part of US commerce and no belongs to the commerce of Mexico, where it can be bought or sold freely.

The rule is very clear in several definitions that vehicles are exported for commerce, for profit, selling the vehicles in another country. Commerce means a business. It does not mean "no longer a part of U.S. commerce" whatever that means. A taxi cab is part of U.S. commerce, that is, it is in a business. Your private vehicle is not for hire and not in commerce.

You are supposed to have a clear title to bring your U.S. plated vehicle into Mexico. That is what they are checking. The majority of this law and rules are to prevent stolen vehicles from being taken out of the country.

You cannot legally sell a U.S. plated vehicle in Mexico. It must leave Mexico with its owner or if the owner dies, someone else removes it.

To sell the vehicle in Mexico it must be Mexican plated. U.S. Customs does not care if you nationalize your U.S. plated vehicle in Mexico.

The U.S. Customs laws are to prevent stolen vehicles from leaving and to collect fees from businesses that intend to export and sell vehicles in a foreign country.

More of the definitions:

http://www.cbp.gov/trade/basic-import-export/export-docs/motor-vehicle

Ultimate Purchaser. "Ultimate Purchaser" means the first person, other than a dealer purchasing in his capacity as a dealer, who in good faith purchases a self-propelled vehicle for purposes other than resale.

Used. "Used" refers to any self-propelled vehicle the equitable or legal title to which has been transferred by a manufacturer, distributor, or dealer to an ultimate purchaser.

Documentary Status

It is the responsibility of the reviewing inspector to ensure that an original certificate of title is presented as provided for in 19 CFR 192.2 ( B). The certificate of title is the core requirement in the Customs export process, regardless of the vehicle's economic value, physical condition, or operating order.

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Include me in with the person that thinks it applies to private vehicles. I had to do some fast talking at the border with US Customs officers to avoid a $500 USD fine for not following the procedure. On the American side of the border, there are facilities where cars meant for export to Mexico have their titles checked for any liens or stolen vehicles. Been there, done it several times. "Entering into the commerce" does not mean the vehicle is used commercially. It means it is no longer part of US commerce and no belongs to the commerce of Mexico, where it can be bought or sold freely.

If you were not intending to sell your car in Mexico and you were given a bad time on the U.S. side for not exporting it, you need to report that to Washington and those agents need to be retrained or fired. It smells like a shake down. They know you get permission to bring your car into Mexico by Mexico. They know their procedures are for dealers exporting for sale to a foreign country, not for people taking a vehicle into Mexico for private use.

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If you were not intending to sell your car in Mexico and you were given a bad time of the U.S. side for not exporting it, you need to report that to Washington and those agents need to be retrained or fired. It smells like a shake down. They know you get permission to bring your car into Mexico by Mexico. They know their procedures are for dealers exporting for sale to a foreign country, not for people taking a vehicle into Mexico for private use.

The vehicle was destined for "permanent export". It doesn't matter whether you intend to sell it or keep it until it turns into a pile of rust. Once you nationalize it here it is no longer part of US commerce. It belongs to Mexican commerce. There was no shakedown. How ridiculous. They could care less about what Mexico requires or issues. The vehicle was going to be exported from the US and that is all they are concerned with. They have a facility at the border where the vehicles are required to be dropped off for inspection. Why can't you just accept that you are mistaken? You have never gone through the process yet you act like an authority.

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The vehicle was destined for "permanent export". It doesn't matter whether you intend to sell it or keep it until it turns into a pile of rust. Once you nationalize it here it is no longer part of US commerce. It belongs to Mexican commerce. There was no shakedown. How ridiculous. They could care less about what Mexico requires or issues. The vehicle was going to be exported from the US and that is all they are concerned with. They have a facility at the border where the vehicles are required to be dropped off for inspection. Why can't you just accept that you are mistaken? You have never gone through the process yet you act like an authority.

Commerce means a business intended to make money not a vehicle within a country. Commerce is business not location.

The U.S. export procedures are strictly for people who are making money exporting vehicles for sale or for a business like a car rental dealer importing cars in a foreign country. That is why the definition reads ""Ultimate Purchaser. "Ultimate Purchaser" means the first person, other than a dealer purchasing in his capacity as a dealer, who in good faith purchases a self-propelled vehicle for purposes other than resale."

The rule clearly describes vehicles that are not private party vehicles going to Mexico for the personal use of the owner but they are vehicles that are destined to be sold in a foreign country.

As a private person you cannot sell your U.S. plated vehicle in Mexico so it is impossible for the rule to apply to you.

You need to report the customs agents who tried to shake you down and threatened you with a fine. They know the law and if they looked at your vehicle knowing it was not going to be sold in Mexico and it was for private use, you must report them. We do not want U.S. Customs turning into a place for bribes and shakedowns.

Commerce does not mean a private vehicle being driven in a country. Commerce means a business.

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Blah, blah blah..... I am very aware of the laws in this country concerning importing vehicles.

"Commerce is the whole system of an economy that constitutes an environment for business. The system includes legal, economic, political, social, cultural and technological systems that are in operation in any country. Thus, commerce is a system or an environment that affects the business prospects of an economy. It can also be defined as a component of business which includes all activities, functions and institutions involved in transferring goods from producers to consumers."

The language you interpret as commercial use is incorrect. A vehicle that is nationalized and plated in Mexico belongs to Mexico's commerce and not that of the USA.

But as I said previously, you rely on the information of a web page. And then you incorrectly interpret its meaning. I have personally brought 3 vehicles into this country and legalized them and found out from personal experience what it involves. When you do that, then come around offering advice. Otherwise you're just an internet expert with little to offer, much like yucalandia.

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