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Legalizing J Car


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The other thread about legalizing or nationalizing a J Car went way off the subject so I am making a new post. We need to legalize our car because we had to apply for permanente and will not be able to drive the foreign plated car anymore after the permanete status is received. We have a 2009 Nissan J car and was told by Mago's office (after they took a copy of the title and sent it to Mexico City with an inquiry as to whether it could be legalized now or not) ... that, yes, we could start the process anytime and that it could be legalized now.

We were quoted a price and I decided to look around to see if we could do it less expensive. I researched this board and one of the recommendations that came up several times was Erick Medina of Grupo-MCA. I gave him a call this morning and he told me that only 2008's and older could be legalized. He said that the 2009's would not be able to be legalized until at least November and NOT to believe anyone in Chapala that told us different. He said that if it could be done that they would be doing it and that he knew of several many people that had been "messed around" here in Chapala.

Now, I don't know what to believe. Mago's office has helped us for the last 8 1/2 years and have never misrepresented anything to us before. I don't know this Erick Medina but he was recommende by several people. Does anyone know how to find out from a Mexican Government website what is true and what is not in this regard?

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We used that office for many years until we found that we had forged IMSS documents and lost our coverage. The employee was fired, but we have lost IMSS and the money was wasted.

We also have a J-car, a 1999; so we hope you do find a secure and easy solution. We are too old to drive it north and, even if we did, would not get enough for it to pay for the trip, in spite of it being just fine ... it is still a 1999 vehicle.

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We used that office for many years until we found that we had forged IMSS documents and lost our coverage. The employee was fired, but we have lost IMSS and the money was wasted.

We also have a J-car, a 1999; so we hope you do find a secure and easy solution. We are too old to drive it north and, even if we did, would not get enough for it to pay for the trip, in spite of it being just fine ... it is still a 1999 vehicle.

Which office? Mago or Medina?

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The other thread about legalizing or nationalizing a J Car went way off the subject so I am making a new post. We need to legalize our car because we had to apply for permanente and will not be able to drive the foreign plated car anymore after the permanete status is received. We have a 2009 Nissan J car and was told by Mago's office (after they took a copy of the title and sent it to Mexico City with an inquiry as to whether it could be legalized now or not) ... that, yes, we could start the process anytime and that it could be legalized now.

We were quoted a price and I decided to look around to see if we could do it less expensive. I researched this board and one of the recommendations that came up several times was Erick Medina of Grupo-MCA. I gave him a call this morning and he told me that only 2008's and older could be legalized. He said that the 2009's would not be able to be legalized until at least November and NOT to believe anyone in Chapala that told us different. He said that if it could be done that they would be doing it and that he knew of several many people that had been "messed around" here in Chapala.

Now, I don't know what to believe. Mago's office has helped us for the last 8 1/2 years and have never misrepresented anything to us before. I don't know this Erick Medina but he was recommende by several people. Does anyone know how to find out from a Mexican Government website what is true and what is not in this regard?

Check with Sonia because she is also nationalizing through UCD and maybe she can do a more recent vehicle. She will be honest with you and if you join SMACoollist you will not find anyone posting who has had a bad experience with her.

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Joco, my understanding is that UCD is NOT nationalizing. You don't get regular state plates, title, etc., and there is no guarantee that you ever will. And, you cannot legally drive your car everywhere in Mexico, like a legal nationalization, nor legally sell it like a legal one. And, I don't believe they can tell you how much you must pay "if and when" that day ever comes. It could be MUCH more that the current legal nationalization. And, what about insurance coverage, since UCD is not legal in Guad?

I don't nationalize cars and that is why I keep writing for people to ask Sonia. That way you get the correct information. She has a broker who can nationalize nonNafta vehicles and he is not UCD.

This is an explanation of what she does. I hope it is allowed to stay here to benefit people. It is not advertising. It is to give people options with their vehicles.

"Nationalizing Process"

"Person emails VIN and usually within 48 hours I get a price to nationalize. The process can take up to 14 weeks or more! We have nationalized more than 25 including in San Miguel de Allende, Manzanillo, Zihuatanejo, San Miguel, Troncones, Cozumel, etc and our 2008 Canadian plated SUV.

This is a totally legal process. On Feb 1, 2014 I meet with Aduana’s staff as they helped me in photographing some client’s cars. They are supportive of this program.

NAFTA made vehicles 2008 and older can all be nationalized and it is done in the owner’s name by a registered / Aduana-approved broker in Mexicali, Baja California. An “amparo” which is similar to an injunction allows this to happen.

Non-NAFTA made vehicles 2006 and older can also be nationalized but is done in the name of a Mexican national in the state of Chihuahua through a registered broker and under the supervision of UCD. One nationalized, the car is issued Chihuahua plates and title. That person then hands in the plates and signs off the title which is then sent to me. You have possession of the car all this time. The pedimento, factura and title will be given to so you may get your state plates and title. This is a common process when nationalizing in Mexico.

There will be no additional costs and no surprises. Typically the price range is 22,500 to 35,000 pesos total for a NAFTA made vehicle. If, for example your vehicle is a newer, a diesel, double-cab big truck, motorhome, etc it will be more.

A VIN starting with a number is NAFTA made. A VIN starting with a letter is non-NAFTA.

The costs I quote will include all fees for nationalizing. If you are not local I pay the courier fees to return pedimento and factura and title (if non-NAFTA) you. The only additional fees you will have are those you pay to the government for the process / costs for your license plates and local registration.

No long distance driving is required. You save on stress, driving to the border, gasoline, tolls, accommodations, meals, finding a reputable broker, vehicle inspection, numerous forms etc.

If person agrees to proceed and not local (if local I go to their home) I need:

scanned copy of title front and back (I need original title if non-NAFTA)

scanned copy of main passport page if NAFTA cars

scanned copy of recent utility bill if NAFTA car (does not have to be in their name)

3 photos of vehicle: 1. All of passenger side; 2. driver's door jam VIN (up close); 3. VIN at bottom of windshield (on driver's side up close and sun blocked)

All 3 photos and scanned documents sent in one email.

Upon funds being in my bank account, a receipt is issued and scanned and emailed to the car owner. Your receipt will state full refund if car is not nationalized.

We can’t get back the deposit you paid when you entered Mexico nor remove your car from Aduana's records. Doing so requires a trip to the border. Large deposits started in June 2011.

The person then takes their factura and pedimento plus whatever else the office wants to their local license office (Renta) and applies for state plates and a Mexican car registration. In some states this happens same day and for example in Guanajuato state one does the process on-line with an application in Spanish, makes an appointment and immediately follows up with an email and scanned documents. Then your Guanajuato plates and registration are available in approximately a week. In Guanajuato state the cost is approximately 1000 p. In Guanajuato state you need a Mexican driver's license to register a vehicle."

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Joco, my understanding is that UCD is NOT nationalizing. You don't get regular state plates, title, etc., and there is no guarantee that you ever will. And, you cannot legally drive your car everywhere in Mexico, like a legal nationalization, nor legally sell it like a legal one. And, I don't believe they can tell you how much you must pay "if and when" that day ever comes. It could be MUCH more that the current legal nationalization. And, what about insurance coverage, since UCD is not legal in Guad?

UCD is both nationalizing and creating a Mexican registry of foreign plated cars. These are two separate things, they encourage nationaliztion - if you can afford it. Insurance is available for UCD plated cars from Bancomer - they have a program just for this purpose. UCD plates are now allowed all over Mexico, by the UCD at least, at the same time there are still police who will use any excuse to stop a vehicle. At least with a UCD plated vehicle the police can determine if the car is stolen. Transitos are not allowed to check immigration papers and their powers to impound a vehicle are severely limited.

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Thank you, Joco, for the info and advice to ask Sonia. This is the kind of thing that makes this board so valuable.

I just checked with her and, for me, the bad news from Sonia is that for some reason our Hyundai (2002) is the only non-NAFTA that can't be nationalized.

I'm hoping that situation will change, as we don't have to go permanente until March 2016.

Lexy

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Sonia has written that their process does not work for Korean cars, so all Kia's & Hyundai's cannot be nationalized using her process, not just 2002 Hyundai's. Swedish, German, Japanese vehicles are OK.

Thanks. I do understand that it's not just our Hyundai 2002 that can't be nationalized. I simply did not know until Sonia's email to me that Korean cars continue to be excluded from nationalization. (I had hopes.)

Lexy

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The head of Transito for Jalisco said this at the special meeting at LCS. He said if a Transito threatens to impound your car, "tell him here's the keys" - he will most likely lose his job. Check the Guadlajara Reporter.

UCD was using a licensed broker for the actual nationalizing, but this may have changed, since January licensed brokers are no longer to clear vehicles. No UCD plated vehicles have been seized. In the middle of 2013 they attemped to seize 50 vehicles - there was a huge protest rally, and the President himself intervened (smelling a lot of votes) announced a number of changes, which came into effect in January. Mexico just does not do search and seizure very well (recently the boats, and failures in the seizure of assets of crime).

Too bad about Korea. Hyundai/Kia makes OK vehicles. At one time they must have tried to "dump" (sell way under value) a load of cars into Mexico. I guess the dealers are immune to this http://www.autonews.com/article/20130816/RETAIL01/130819917/hyundai-ending-chrysler-ties-plans-new-car-dealer-network-in-mexico

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I asked Bancomer to insure my UCD plated car and they said no. That was asking 3 different branches. They figure the fact that it is really a U:S. plated car, they cannot provide the insurance.

Again, ask Sonia. This is very popular in Guanajuato. My SUV has full Japanese registration/inspections, Canadian registration with full inspection, newly goverment issued VIN plate as a Canadian made vehicle, expired Canadian plates - yet AXA Mexico has had no problem selling me insurance.

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All I can say is that after driving my beloved Canadian-plated Honda CRV back to Canada in July, selling it there and buying an overpriced Mexican vehicle on my return (a week long drive alone), as we were all told that a J car could absolutely no way be imported, finding out that they are now allowing the process just burns. Lucky all of you who either waited it out or didn't need to deal with it til now.

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All I can say is that after driving my beloved Canadian-plated Honda CRV back to Canada in July, selling it there and buying an overpriced Mexican vehicle on my return (a week long drive alone), as we were all told that a J car could absolutely no way be imported, finding out that they are now allowing the process just burns. Lucky all of you who either waited it out or didn't need to deal with it til now.

No, the J cars could be nationalized back then but we were prohibited from posting that information on this site.

Sonia has the only service I know of that can get J cars nationalized. I haven't heard of any other. I have a NAFTA vehicle so that isn't my problem but I hope the info helps others who need a J car nationalized. I can't imagine driving back to Canada. I thought the Texas border was too far.

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Sonia posted this today:

Tue Feb 11, 2014 7:09 am (PST) . Posted by: soniangel32 Thanks to some changes as of today we are now able to nationalize NAFTA made vehicles often for 2000 to 3000 pesos less than before. Should you wish an exact cost please email me your VIN.
We can nationalize NAFTA made vehicles 2008 and older and 2006 non-NAFTA made vehicles (European and Japan) and older. Motorhomes, cars, SUV's, boats, motorcycles can be nationalized and your vehicle does not leave your property.
Sonia
cell: 044-415-106- 1499
SONIANGEL32 AT HOTMAIL.COM
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All I can say is that after driving my beloved Canadian-plated Honda CRV back to Canada in July, selling it there and buying an overpriced Mexican vehicle on my return (a week long drive alone), as we were all told that a J car could absolutely no way be imported, finding out that they are now allowing the process just burns. Lucky all of you who either waited it out or didn't need to deal with it til now.

Don't feel burned. I considered doing it at the time but it sounds like it isn't a true (without some potential problems) nationalization. So I gave mine away instead of worrying about potential problems when driving it.

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WHO prohibited you from doing that and why would they do that? I never saw any statement about it being prohibited.

I was sent a PM from a moderator stating that posting information about Sonia was considered advertising. Spenser and other locals could give information and it was not considered advertising so I don't know why this was the case back then. The policy seems to have changed again.

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With a J car parked in a private lot here in Vallarta ,and not driven, we were temporariy excited about the possibility of it being able to be truly nationalized . Especially since we heard the same thing from some officials here in Puerto Vallarta (not Aduana though)

We're having a lawyer look into it but my online research led me to the same conclusion as snowyco. I found an article online saying that there had been an extension until December, but only for NAFTA vehicles. I then searched Diario de la Federacion and found nothing. Whatever is able to be done appears not to be a true nationalization although it may.work for anyone wanting to be able to legally drive their own J car. I will report back when I hear something from the lawyer.

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We have checked once again with our facilitator and have been told again that Mexico City said our J car could be imported. Now, I don't know if this is the same as Nationalizing a car because I didn't ask that particular question. We have been assured, however, and shown copies of the documents of another customer that had their J car imported. There were legal importation papers along with copies of the license plates, etc. We are told when everything is completed we will be able to go into the whatever government system it is on the internet and see our car and all the details concerning it. Our facilitator insists on the car going to the border for the existing sticker on the windshield to be removed and to have it officially removed from those records. It will take 3 days up and back and then will immediately be taken to Guadalajara for the license plate application .... which can be anywhere from a short time to several week wait. We are assured we will be able to drive the car legally with the copy of the application form for license plates until they arrive. I may not have all this exactly straight, but this is the jest of it.

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