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For Those Of You Who Go To The US


AutumnDreams

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Yes came up maybe 5 years ago as well on your laptop, no mention then of cell phones. I go back and forth quite often, So far, no problems. But then again, anything I have on my laptop or iPhone would be very boring to someone searching my files.

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Not a problem, anything that could possibly help protect us from terrorists is worth it to me. I don't have anything to hide and don't feel intruded upon. Thanks.

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Not a problem, anything that could possibly help protect us from terrorists is worth it to me. I don't have anything to hide and don't feel intruded upon. Thanks.

The problem is not the search, it is the lack of a warrant within 100 miles of the border. There is no law, just a regulation from HSA.

There is also a small thing called the Constitution.

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The problem is not the search, it is the lack of a warrant within 100 miles of the border. There is no law, just a regulation from HSA.

There is also a small thing called the Constitution.

Not a problem, anything that could possibly help protect us from terrorists is worth it to me. I don't have anything to hide and don't feel intruded upon. Thanks.

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True on 1 side, but about those who go over the border for business, or just pleasure and have their laptops held for 11 days and they are back here in a week or less. Do you think uncle Sam will pay the duty and expenses to send it back to you here in Mexico?

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Ah Hud, maybe you aren't aware, but see the following, the US is still (supposed to be?) a country where you live by the law:

The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights that prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and requires any warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution

Oh, forgot to add: can you specify one single documented instance where this saved us, from anything?

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The U.S. is spending $83 billion per year spying on everyone and their brother, there is nothing in the law or Constitution that would allow warrantless searches anywhere, and, BTW, did they prevent Boston?

All Americans should be concerned with the increasing intrusiveness of their government on personal freedom. And this has absolutely nothing to do with partisan politics, they are all guilty of adding to the problem.

What concerns me is that the Mexican government seems to be marching in lockstep with this business and making Mexico less and less friendly to expats at the same time.

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No warrant is needed anywhere, there is no 100 mile limit if they have reason to suspect violation of laws.

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No warrant is needed anywhere, there is no 100 mile limit if they have reason to suspect violation of laws.

Not true, at least not in the US. They can seize equipment but opening it without a warrant voids its use in court.

My daughter works IT for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. They will seize equipment on a general warrant and then get a separate warrant for every piece of equipment and hard drive.

Beware: She has a program that can search a 1TB drive in under an hour and find every flesh tone on the drive (porn, child pornography etc). She can recover almost anything deleted and formatting does nothing. Her advise to get rid of an old hard drive is to remove the back shield and take a hammer and screw driver to the platters. Hard drives are sealed. You can toss one in the lake and recover the data months later.

Never put anything in the "cloud". She can get that. Also, never backup on one of the online deals, she can subpoena that also.

Password the computer and encrypt anything special with a password 21 digits long. Her password cracker only goes out 20 digits.

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Also, never use a copier in a shop for anything important. They are basically a scanner, hard drive and printer. Everything remains on the Hard drive.

My daughter investigates Medicade/Medicare fraud and they always take the HD out of the copier.

Buy yourself a scanner and a printer..............

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jrm,

Did your daughter go to 'Tech?

Yes, she did. She started out as an aeronautical engineer and ended up as an IT nerd.

She's scary. Just spent 2 weeks in Austria studying something on some new disk recovery. program.

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Not true, at least not in the US. They can seize equipment but opening it without a warrant voids its use in court.

My daughter works IT for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. They will seize equipment on a general warrant and then get a separate warrant for every piece of equipment and hard drive.

Beware: She has a program that can search a 1TB drive in under an hour and find every flesh tone on the drive (porn, child pornography etc). She can recover almost anything deleted and formatting does nothing. Her advise to get rid of an old hard drive is to remove the back shield and take a hammer and screw driver to the platters. Hard drives are sealed. You can toss one in the lake and recover the data months later.

Never put anything in the "cloud". She can get that. Also, never backup on one of the online deals, she can subpoena that also.

Password the computer and encrypt anything special with a password 21 digits long. Her password cracker only goes out 20 digits.

Well I had a conversation with a US federal agent and they were telling me that they have jurisdiction all over the US and can stop and search without a warrant if they believe customs laws have been violated.

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The Patriot Act has been in place for so long now that right to privacy and search/seizure without a warrant are a long dead rights; done away with while the US was in a panic after 9/11 without much of an outcry. And upheld by a liberal Supreme Court. It's much too late to complain about it now.

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